Your search found 23 Results

  1. 1
    335935

    Atlas of eHealth country profiles 2013. eHealth and innovation in women's and children's health. Based on the findings of the 2013 survey of ColA countries by the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [132] p.

    This atlas is based on the 2013 WHO / ITU joint survey that explored the use of eHealth for women’s and children’s health in countries targeted by the Commission on Information and Accountability for Women’s and Children’s Health (CoIA). The objective of the country profiles is to describe the status in 2013 of the use of ICT for women’s and children’s health in 64 responding CoIA countries. This is a unique reference source for policy makers and others involved in planning and implementing eHealth services in countries.
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  2. 2
    335934

    eHealth and innovation in women's and children's health: A baseline review. Based on the findings of the 2013 survey of CoIA countries by the WHO Global Observatory for eHealth. Executive summary.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; International Telecommunication Union [ITU]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2014. [4] p. (WHO/HIS/KER/EHL/14.1)

    Improving the health of women and children is a global health imperative, reflected in two of the most compelling Millennium Development Goals which seek specifically to reduce maternal and infant deaths by 2015. This joint report by the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Telecommunication Union (ITU), based on a 64-country survey, demonstrates -- as never before in such detail -- the vital role that information and communication technologies (ICTs) and particularly eHealth are playing today in helping achieve those targets. It demonstrates how, every day, eHealth is saving the lives of women, their babies and infants in the some of the most vulnerable populations around the world, in a wide variety of innovative ways.
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  3. 3
    332869

    Atlas eHealth country profiles. Based on the findings of the Second Global Survey on eHealth.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Observatory for eHealth

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2011. [244] p.

    This publication presents data on the 114 WHO Member States that participated in the 2009 global survey on eHealth. Intended as a reference to the state of eHealth development in Member States, the publication highlights selected indicators in the form of country profiles. The objectives of the country profiles are to: describe the current status of the use of ICT for health in Member States; and provide information concerning the progress of eHealth applications in these countries. (Excerpt)
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  4. 4
    330596
    Peer Reviewed

    E-health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: a decade of challenges and achievements.

    Al-Shorbaji N

    Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal. 2008; 14 Suppl:S157-73.

    The World Health Organization Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) has made huge progress in terms of use of information and communication technology (ICT) in the healthcare sector. Despite the late entry of ICT in health in the Region, there have been many impressive developments both as public health applications and in medical care. The article attempts to draw a picture of the current status of e-health applications in the Region with some specific examples of milestones and achievements made. The overall ICT situation and economic factors coupled with the health situation in the Region dictate the state-of-the-art of e-health.
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  5. 5
    329555

    HIV interventions for young people in the education sector.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on HIV interventions for young people in the education sector. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  6. 6
    329554

    Community-based HIV interventions for young people.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on community HIV interventions for young people. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  7. 7
    329552

    HIV interventions for most-at-risk young people.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    This Brief has been developed by the Inter-Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, development partners, civil society and other implementing partners on HIV interventions for most-at-risk young people. It is part of a series of seven global Guidance Briefs that focus on HIV prevention, treatment, care and support interventions for young people that can be delivered through different settings and for a range of target groups.
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  8. 8
    323152

    The level of Internet access and ICT training for health information professionals in sub-Saharan Africa.

    Ajuwon GA; Rhine L

    Health Information and Libraries Journal. 2008 Sep; 25(3):175-85.

    BACKGROUND: Information and Communication Technologies (ICTs) are important tools for development. Despite its significant growth on a global scale, Internet access is limited in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA). Few studies have explored Internet access, use of electronic resources and ICT training among health information professionals in Africa. OBJECTIVE: The study assessed Internet access, use of electronic resources and ICT training among health information professionals in SSA. METHODS: A 26-item self-administered questionnaire in English and French was used for data collection. The questionnaire was completed by health information professionals from five Listservs and delegates at the 10th biannual Congress of the Association of Health Information and Libraries in Africa (AHILA). RESULTS: A total of 121 respondents participated in the study and, of those, 68% lived in their countries' capital. The majority (85.1%) had Internet access at work and 40.8% used cybercafes as alternative access points. Slightly less than two-thirds (61.2%) first learned to use ICT through self-teaching, whilst 70.2% had not received any formal training in the previous year. Eighty-eight per cent of respondents required further ICT training. CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS: In SSA, freely available digital information resources are underutilized by health information professionals. ICT training is recommended to optimize use of digital resources. To harness these resources, intergovernmental and non-governmental organizations must play a key role.
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  9. 9
    323483

    Supplementary report. Case studies: Getting Research into Policy and Practice (GRIPP).

    Nath S

    [New York, New York], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Jul. 117 p.

    Population Council approached by Head and Deputy Head of OB/GYN Dept at Dantec Hospital and Burkina Maternity Hospital in Senegal and Burkina Faso, respectively. Study designed by Population Council, CRESAR, CEFOREP, MoH in both countries. Ethical standards assessed by ethical review committee in each country followed by Population Council's Internal Review Board. Operations research to introduce and test improved model of PAC. Research team included representatives from CRESAR/CEFOREP, MoH, donors, other stakeholders and service providers. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    323482

    Final report: Getting Research into Policy and Practice (GRIPP).

    Nath S

    [New York, New York], Population Council, Frontiers in Reproductive Health, 2007 Jul. [35] p.

    Progress in the initial stages of the documentation process can be slow, though it gathers momentum over time. Successful communication channels such as email are important for maintaining the momentum. Familiarity with applying the GRIPP framework and process and having existing networks in the field adds value to the product. An initial lack of knowledge about stakeholders can slow down the documentation process. However, the documentation process can help discover who these stakeholders are and the usefulness of the study to them. Case study information is much easier to recall and richer when the research is still current or only recently concluded. A snowballing effect, which results in getting more stakeholder perspectives than originally thought, can occur during the process. A study may have clinical and social and other dimensions, which have very different processes and outcomes with relation to a given research study. Each needs to be followed up in order to fully understand the utilisation and effectiveness of the research. A well-positioned facilitator may be the best placed to assume a neutral position and document the research process. Many of the obstacles in relation to the documentation process that were encountered could be overcome if researchers built the documentation process into their research schedule. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    312472

    We are getting into a great era of hope. WHO immunization work: 2005 highlights.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Immunization, Vaccines and Biologicals, 2006. 56 p. (WHO/IVB/06.02)

    Mission: To vaccinate all people at risk against vaccine-preventable diseases. Immunization is a proven health intervention: it successfully controls and has even eradicated disease. Immunization prevents suffering, disability and death on a large scale. Immunization is one of the least costly and most effective health interventions. Immunization is a channel through which to deliver other life-saving health interventions and can help strengthen health systems. Immunization will directly help achieve the Millennium Development Goals on reducing child mortality, improving maternal health and combating infectious diseases. Immunization carries economic benefits. It contributes to Millennium Development Goals on the eradication of extreme poverty and achieving universal primary education, through helping to ensure the health of boys and girls so they will be able to complete a full course of primary schooling. Immunization policies and strategies are based on evidence and best practices. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    297956

    The Internet and social development: African voices on HIV / AIDS and education.

    Lawrence J

    In: The HIV challenge to education: a collection of essays, edited by Carol Coombe. Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, 2004. 137-176. (Education in the Context of HIV / AIDS)

    This paper draws policy conclusions from a four-month experiment to bring information technology to bear on the problem of HIV/AIDS in Southern Africa during preparations for the Dakar World Education Forum in April 2000. A UNDP-sponsored interactive virtual e-dialogue among sub-Saharan African voices addressed 14 major issues currently facing educational policy-makers. By networking through a neutral, user-friendly medium, this project generated surprisingly wide regional interest. Among more than 600 subscribers from 54 countries, almost half were from sub-Saharan Africa. Postings provided new and compelling evidence of institutional and individual coping behaviours throughout the subregion. The List offered an opportunity to share difficult but ultimately successful experiences, such as formation of associations of PLWHAs, and collective action to affect public policy. Vivid personal encounters with the effects of the epidemic were courageously shared, and major 'missing' issues needing policy attention identified. Scholarships were provided to two especially articulate list representatives so that they could present discussion summaries at the Dakar World Education Forum. Initial misgivings as to the suitability of an Internet-based virtual information-exchange on this sensitive subject proved unfounded. The Internet proved a viable policy tool for development in the subregion, and helped offset negative effects of the African diaspora. (author's)
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  13. 13
    296264

    Voices of hope: adolescents and the tsunami.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Sep. 36 p.

    Defined as the second decade of life, adolescence is filled with great possibilities even in times of crisis, both for the individual child and for the community as a whole. Investing in adolescents is an urgent priority not only because it is their inalienable right to develop to their full potential but also because interventions during this period can lead to lasting social and economic benefits to the larger community. Time and again, adolescents and young people around the world have proved that they can provide innovative solutions in the midst of complex humanitarian crises. When given the opportunity to influence the plans and decisions that affect their lives, adolescents in emergency situations have spoken out against abuse or neglect, have joined hands with planners and managers in designing appropriate community programmes, and have initiated actions to support their peers. In each of these situations, they have brought their vision, idealism and sense of justice to the social agenda and have contributed to cohesion, peace-building and community reconstruction. At the same time, as experience from many countries shows, this participation has raised their confidence and self-esteem, given them citizenship and livelihood skills, and empowered them to protect their own rights. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    293005

    Internet resources for demographers.

    Gryn TA

    South African Journal of Demography. 1999; 7(1):63-71.

    This paper provides a description of demographic resources available on the Internet. These resources include census data, online databases, and home sites of demographic organizations. The description of demographic Internet resources is divided into five sections: North American demography, international demography, general interest items, health-related sources, and geography-related sources. The paper is followed by two appendices. The first provides a brief introduction to the Internet and to Internet access; the second contains a quick-reference list of Internet sites. Readers who are unfamiliar with the Internet should consider reading Appendix I before proceeding. Because one paper cannot reference every demographic resource on the Internet, this paper should be seen primarily as an attempt to impart enough knowledge for readers to seek out further information on their own, according to their particular research interests. (author's)
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  15. 15
    288795
    Peer Reviewed

    Contemporary issues in women's health.

    Arulkumaran S; Johnson TR

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2005 Jul; 90(1):4-9.

    Alliance for Cervical Cancer Prevention, January 10, 2005. A consortium of international public health agencies has published a “how-to” manual on implementing effective screening programs for cervical cancer in developing countries. The Alliance for Cervical Center Prevention is a partnership of global agencies, including the World Health Organization’s International Agency for Research on Cancer. For the past 5 years, the alliance has worked in more than 50 countries on identifying, promoting, and implementing effective, safe, and affordable cervical prevention strategies in low-resource settings. The resulting 279-page manual, Planning and Implementing Cervical Cancer Prevention and Control Programs, is fully endorsed by the WHO. In the forward, Catherine LeGales Camus and Joy Phumaphi, assistants to the WHO director general, write that cervical cancer is one of the most preventable and treatable cancers, and that well organized programs in developed countries have led to a “remarkable reduction in mortality and morbidity.” (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    276565

    Misuse of the internet for the purpose of sexual exploitation.

    Coalition Against Trafficking in Women

    Coalition Against Trafficking in Women. 1998 May 1; [3] p..

    Acknowledging that the Internet can be a valuable medium of communication, and noting that Article 19 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights identifies the right of freedom of expression as a fundamental human right, and that all recommendations must be implemented to protect this right. Recognizing that the Internet is the most unregulated communications network in the world with new technologies that present difficult challenges to national and international regulation and enforcement. Alarmed that multiple forms of sexual exploitation, such as prostitution, sex tours, bride trafficking, pornography, live sex shows, and rape videos for sexual entertainment are promoted; that the Internet is now the preferred site for mail order bride promotions; and that the Internet offers multiple forums in which the trafficking, prostitution, and other forms of sexual exploitation of women and children are promoted and carried out. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    276281
    Peer Reviewed

    Contemporary issues in women's health.

    Arulkumaran S; Johnson TR

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2004 Nov; 87(2):111-113.

    In May 2004, the Food and Drug Administration of the United States ruled that emergency contraception would not be available over the counter. In December 2003, two FDA expert panels overwhelmingly recommended approval of the drug by a 23 to 4 vote after reviewing more than 15,000 pages of data for over 40 studies in support of the over the counter (OTC) application. The FDA typically follows the recommendations of the government scientific committees, and the experts in this case made it clear that use of emergency contraception does not increase promiscuity or unprotected sex among teenaged women. In an unusual decision written by Dr. Steven Galson, Acting Director of FDA’s Center for Drug Evaluation and Research, and not supported by other members of the FDA staff, a decision was deferred pending further information about the safety of emergency contraception in girls under the age of 16 or on the possibility raised by the manufacturer in their proposal that the drug be used over the counter for girls over the age of 16 and that there be an age limit to those who could get it without speaking to a pharmacist or without a prescription. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    191765
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO boosts internet access to clinical trials.

    Zarocostas J

    Lancet. 2004 Apr 10; 363(9416):1206.

    WHO has signed up to an initiative to keep the international community informed about clinical trials —by making information about randomised controlled trials available free on the internet. From April 2, all randomised controlled trials approved by WHO’s ethics review board will be assigned an International Standard Randomised Controlled Trial number (ISRCTN). “The ISRCTN register is an important first step within the wider context of the new emphasis on the need to increase international access to, and utilisation of, health-related knowledge”, said Tikki Pang, WHO director for research policy and cooperation. In order to qualify for such designation, the trials must satisfy a minimum standard —ie, that they are scientifically and ethically sound, say WHO officials. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    184912

    The new information technologies and women: essential reflections. [La nueva tecnología de la información y la mujer: reflexiones fundamentales]

    Bonder G

    Santiago, Chile, United Nations, Economic Commission for Latin America [ECLAC], 2003 Jul. 56 p. (CEPAL - SERIE Mujer y Desarrollo No. 39)

    Although in Latin America and the Caribbean there is growing concern to take into account the issue of gender in public policies, this process is still embryonic and fragmented in the case of economic and technological policies. The Women and Development Unit of ECLAC is therefore implementing the project "Institutionalization of gender policies within ECLAC and sectoral ministries". The objective of this project is to strengthen technical policies, strategies, tools and capacities, both within ECLAC and in selected countries of the region, in order to encourage equity between men and women in the process and benefits of development, especially with regard to economic and labour policies. One of the activities of the project, organized by the Women and Development Unit together with the International Trade Division of ECLAC and the Centre for Women's Studies and Social Gender Relations of the University of São Paulo, was a meeting of experts on "Globalization, technological change and gender equity" in the city of São Paulo, Brazil, on 5 and 6 November 2001. The purpose of the meeting was to discuss the most relevant aspects of the opportunities and restrictions imposed by the processes of globalization and technological change, with the aim of proposing areas for research, as well as an agenda of public policies that would help to achieve equity. This document was presented as a background study for the discussion at the meeting of experts. It is clear from the text that the new technologies are taking us into a dizzy time of new exclusions, and that in addition to being a material reality they are also a discursive product with effects on institutions, public policies and individuals. The study reviews an extensive amount of theoretical literature, as well as most of the research concerning the inclusion and relationship of women in connection with the new information technologies and skills. This review identifies the major obstacle to reinforcing the potential positive impacts of the new technologies as the lack of information on how they, and especially computers, can help policies, and also individual women, to achieve their goals. It is also shown that we are dealing with two disconnected concepts: the information society and the information economy, and the gender perspective is presented as a means of linking them. As for the impact on social and gender equity, and the current digital divide, according to this document research is needed on more than access alone. There is patently a need for policies to regulate and democratize the new information and knowledge technologies, and it is important to analyze the collective imaginary that is being constructed around them and the different forms of subjectivity that the Internet is encouraging, within a perspective of the future and of changes in social relations. (author's)
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  20. 20
    178153

    Latin American and Caribbean Network on Strategic Planning and AIDS, REDPES. UNAIDS case study. REDPES, Red de planificación estratégica y SIDA de América Latina y el Caribe. Estudio de caso de ONUSIDA.

    Herrera C; Morrison K; Negroni M; Bronfman M

    Geneva, Switzerland, Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS], 2003 Feb. 25 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Case Study; UNAIDS/03.13E)

    The objective of this case study is to document the Red Latinoamericana y del Caribe de Planificación Estratégica en SIDA (REDPES) experience so that it may serve as a reference guide for similar initiatives in other regions and describe the role of REDPES in promoting strategic planning for HIV/AIDS. As the only strategic planning network for H/V/AIDS worldwide, REDPES can use the lessons learned during its brief history, challenges and accomplishments to inform the development of similar networks in other regions. This document describes the background and context of the network's founding. It provides a brief history, describing the main activities and accomplishments, noting principal problems encountered and lessons learned, and discusses the principal collaborations and strategic alliances formed to sustain the network, as well as the monitoring and evaluation mechanisms utilized. It also presents future strategies and challenges for REDPES. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    164862

    Advocacy guide for sexual and reproductive health and rights, Revised ed.

    Hoffman C; Henderson G; Ketting E

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 2001 Jul. 61 p.

    This document offers a framework for achieving an effective advocacy campaign in the field of SRH by family planning associations, the International Planned Parenthood Federation, and other nongovernmental organizations.
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  22. 22
    169782

    UN Population Fund and the Development Gateway launch portal on population and reproductive health. New Internet initiative to strengthen knowledge sharing and exchange.

    Pasquariella S

    Adolescence Education Newsletter. 2002 Jun; 5(1):5.

    This article describes POP/Reproductive Health Portal, an Internet initiative focusing on population and reproductive health. Launched in New York on April 2002, by the UN Population Fund and the Development Gateway Foundation. The Portal will provide a community-based database of shared population information and promote innovative knowledge-sharing arrangements among expert organizations in the field.
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  23. 23
    165767

    Appendix 2: Sources of information on environment and development.

    Neefjes K

    In: Environments and livelihoods: strategies for sustainability, by Koos Neefjes. Oxford, England, Oxfam, 2000. 221-8. (Development Guidelines)

    This appendix of the book, "Environments and Livelihoods: Strategies for Sustainability", presents sources of information on environment and development. It notes that with the Internet as an extremely useful source of information, UN agencies and some of the development banks have set up Web sites for specific country programs. Annotated listings of Web sites of multilateral organizations, organizations on research and information, and nongovernmental organizations on environment and development are enumerated in this paper. Most of the Web sites listed provide links to other sites. Lastly, Web sites of publishers who specialize in environment and other development issues are also provided in this appendix.
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