Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    795766

    International fertility research program sponsors effort in 43 lands to develop new, safer methods.

    International Family Planning Perspectives. 1979 Sep; 5(3):127-9.

    The International Fertility Research Program (IFRP) is sponsoring research in 30 developing countries and 13 developed nations in an effort to develop more effective contraceptive methods. Particular emphasis is being placed on developing contraceptives for women in developing countries where nutritional, health, and sanitation conditions make current methods either difficult or less effective to use. Trials of a pill regimen including vitamin supplementation are underway in Sri Lanka, and a progestogen-only pill for use by lactating women is being tested in Egypt and India. Progestogens apparently do not modify the content of maternal milk. Another study involves the testing of a Lippes loop which releases Trasylol, a bleeding suppressant, in an effort to overcome bleeding problems associated with IUD use. The IFRP has developed and is testing biodegradable appendages which can be attached to IUDs to help retain the device in postpartum women during the period when the uterus is enlarged. Other efforts are being directed toward improving and simplifying sterilization procedures. In Chile, pellets of quinacrine have been inserted into the upper area of the uterus. As the pellets dissolve the quinacrine enters the tubes and produces scar tissue which eventually closes the tube. This research may pave the way toward the development of a non-surgical sterilization method. Animal studies of a reversible sterilization procedure in which a condom-like device is fitted over the ends of the tubes are in progress. In another project a modified laparoscope, called the Laprocator, is being evaluated. The device does not use electricity and is particularly suitable for use in areas in which electricity is lacking or the source is unstable. The device is used in a procedure called suprapubic endoscopy in which only a small incision is needed. Insufflation of the abdomen is unnecessary, and elastic rings are used to close the tubes. IFRP will undertake an innovative motivational project in the Middle East during the coming religious holidays.
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  2. 2
    776180

    The investigation of the infertile couple: a critique of the currently available diagnostic tests.

    NEWTON JR

    In: Diczfalusy, E., ed. Regulation of human fertility. (Proceedings of the WHO Symposium on Advances in Fertility Regulation, Moscow, USSR, November 16-19, 1976) Copenhagan, Denmark, Scriptor, 1977. p. 111-134

    A 6-month regimen for managing infertile men and/or women ideally forms 4 stages: 1) history and examination of the couple; 2) confirmation of ovulation, compatibility of sperm and mucus, and seminology; 3) tests for tubal patency; and 4) detailed endocrine tests for abnormalities found in Stages 1-3. Medical history should include emotional stress and work pressures, if any. Ovulation confirmation requires 2 tests combined from these 4: 1) basal body temperature; 2) endometrial biopsy; 3) blood progesterone levels; and 4) urinary pregnanediol. These procedures are outlined in detail, and figures chart body temperature variations and expected progesterone and pregnanediol levels. Assessment of cervical mucus and measurement of sperm penetration combine in vitro and in vivo tests. The Sims-Huhner test (postcoital test), though not standardized, is used to analyze sperm-mucus interaction by quantitative scoring of sperm count and motility. Other in vitro tests are the sperm-mucus match test and the fractional postcoital test (both described). Tubal patency is investigated by tubal insufflation with CO2, hysterosalpingography, endoscopy, and laparoscopy. Additional Stage 4 tests include vaginal cytology and assessment of estrogen and progesterone effects.
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  3. 3
    773960

    Guide to equipment selection for M/F sterilization procedures. Guide du materiel utilise pour les procedures de sterilisation des hommes et des femmes.

    Reingold LA

    Population Reports. Series M: Special Topics. 1977 Sep; (1):[36] p.

    This is a guide to aid in selecting and maintaining the proper equipment used in the following sterilization procedures: 1) minilaparotomy, 2) laparoscopy, 3) conventional laparotomy, 4) colpotomy, 5) culdoscopy, and 6) vasectomy. Prototype, experimental, or infrequently used instruments are not discussed. Colpotomy, minilaparotomy, and conventional vasectomy are low-technology procedures requiring relatively simple, locally produced instruments, e.g., retractors, forceps, and scalpels. High-technology equipment consists of specialized items, e.g., laparoscopes and culdoscopes. These are produced in a limited number of technically advanced countries. Equipment donor agencies are discussed. The following factors must be considered in selecting equipment: 1) suitability for the intended procedures, 2) quality of the instrument, 3) ease of repair, and 4) initial cost. Each type of equipment is pictured, diagrammed, described, and charted against others of its kind. Maintenance and repair guidelines are provided.
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