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  1. 1
    321694

    Panel 4. Introductory remarks.

    McDougall G

    [Unpublished] 2004. Presented at the Conference on Gender Justice in Post-Conflict Situations, "Peace Needs Women and Women Need Justice”. Co-organized by the United Nations Development Fund for Women [UNIFEM] and the International Legal Assistance Consortium. New York, New York, September 15-17, 2004. 5 p.

    When wars occur, women are usually the most abused, aggrieved and powerless. In the vast majority of countries, women play no significant role in the decision-making process of whether war is warranted or lawful. When hostilities break out, women are exposed not only to the forms of violence and devastation that accompany any war but also to forms of violence directed specifically at women on account of their gender. The use of sexual violence and sexual slavery as tactics and weapons of war remains at a high level in spite of tremendous strides made by the global community over the past decade. It is imperative to acknowledge the immeasurable injury to body, mind and spirit that is inflicted by these acts. The overall deterioration in the conditions of women in armed conflict situations is due not only to the collapse of social restraints and the general mayhem that armed conflict causes, but also to a strategic decision on the part of combatants to intimidate and destroy the enemy as a whole byraping and enslaving women who are identified as members of the other warring party. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    309244

    The Global Coalition on Women and AIDS. 2005 progress report.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]. Global Coalition on Women and AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, [2006]. 17 p.

    The Global Coalition on Women and AIDS (GCWA) was launched by UNAIDS and partners in February 2004 in response to rising rates of HIV infection among women globally, and a growing concern that existing AIDS strategies did not address social and economic inequalities that make women particularly vulnerable to HIV. The GCWA is structured as an informal, global alliance of civil society groups, networks of women living with HIV, and UN organizations with four key goals: to raise the visibility of issues related to women, girls and AIDS; to highlight strategies to strengthen women's access to HIV prevention and care services; to build partnerships for action; and, in so doing, to scale up efforts that will lead to concrete, measurable improvements in the lives of women and girls. The GCWA focuses on women and AIDS rather than gender and AIDS. This is deliberate. Whilst acknowledging that gender inequalities fuel and sustain the epidemic, the profound changes required in attitudes, behaviour and societal structures may well take generations. In the meantime, nearly two-thirds of young people living with HIV are adolescent girls. The GCWA seeks to include but move beyond gender-based analyses to action. It seeks to work with men and women, with existing allies, as well as new partners in the women's movement to prevent women from becoming infected and to live full lives, even when infected or profoundly affected by HIV. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    195370

    HIV efforts are failing women and girls.

    Piot P; Thompson E

    Global AIDSLink. 2004 Apr-May; (85):9.

    Mrs. Akinyi's husband died of AIDS in 1990. She believes her husband infected her with HIV - he had a history of extramarital affairs. When he died, her in-laws denied her property inheritance. In her words, "Immediately after the burial, I was chased away from home with my children." Mrs. Nyakumabor's husband died of AIDS in 1998, and left her HIV-positive with five children. Her in-laws grabbed household items and took over the house and land she had helped pay for. Soon after her husband's death, Mrs. Nyakumabor's father-in-law called a family meeting, told her to choose an inheritor, and ordered her to be cleansed by having sex with a fisherman. Mrs. Nyakumabor refused, causing an uproar. She now struggles to meet her family's needs, and her slum landlord has threatened to evict her because she cannot always pay rent on time. These women's stories (their names have been changed) are two of the hundreds collected by Human Rights Watch and other organizations, documenting the stripping of property rights in the wake of AIDS among some of the most vulnerable people on earth. (excerpt)
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