Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    330816

    High prevalence of antiretroviral drug resistance mutations in HIV-1 non-B subtype strains from African children receiving antiretroviral therapy regimen according to the 2006 revised WHO recommendations [letter]

    Gody JC; Charpentier C; Mbitikon O; Si-Mohamed A; LeGoff J; Gresenguet G; Belec L

    Journal of Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndromes. 2008 Dec 15; 49(5):566-9.

    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    320935

    UNESCO and HIV / AIDS: ten lessons.

    Hernes G

    In: The HIV challenge to education: a collection of essays, edited by Carol Coombe. Paris, France, UNESCO, International Institute for Educational Planning, 2004. 253-263. (Education in the Context of HIV / AIDS)

    Twenty years after the identification of AIDS, some 60 million people have been infected by HIV, a number corresponding to the entire population of France, the United Kingdom or Thailand. Those who have died equal the population of Norway, Sweden, Finland and Denmark combined. Those currently infected - more than 40 million - number more than the entire population of Canada. The number of children thought to be orphaned by HIV/AIDS - some 14 million - is already more than the total population of Ecuador. Over the coming decade their numbers may rise to a staggering 50 million worldwide. In other words, the extent of this pandemic is unprecedented in human history. And the worst is yet to come, for many millions more will be infected, many millions more will die, many millions more will be orphaned. On September 11 2001, more than 3,000 people died in the New York bombings. Every day, around the world, HIV infects at least five times that number. But it is not only individuals who are at risk. The social fabric of whole communities, societies and cultures is threatened. The disease is certain to be a scourge throughout our lifetime. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    318241
    Peer Reviewed

    Reproductive medicine in South Africa and IFFS 2007 -- Durban [editorial]

    Dalmeyer P

    South African Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 2007 Apr; 13(2):34-35.

    The standard of reproductive medicine in South Africa compares very favorably with that in the rest of the world. In keeping with other countries, reproductive medicine is now recognised as a sub-specialty by the Colleges of Medicine of South Africa and the fellowship curriculum comprises two years' full-time training. In contrast to the First World it is of concern that in this country reproductive technologies are mainly concentrated in the private sector, but we have a number of centres that have made substantial scientific contributions. In addition the private sector has gradually started to play an important role, participating in the training of specialists with an interest in this discipline. The South African Tissue Act, concerning gametes/ embryos, is extremely lenient, which has brought about some interesting challenges. We have seen a surge of infertility clinics in the USA exploiting young South African students for their genetic material. Furthermore, we have no legal limits regarding the number of embryos that can be transferred, in contradistinction to Europe where such constraints have had a marked impact on pregnancy rates. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    279259

    Africa beyond famine.

    Harsch E

    Africa Recovery. 2003 May; 17(1):[6] p..

    Africa today suffers from a "deadly triad" of interrelated burdens -- food insecurity, HIV/AIDS and a reduced capacity to govern and provide basic services -- says UN Secretary-General Kofi Annan. Therefore, a "new, integrated response from both the governments of Africa and the international community" is needed, he told the Group of 8 (G-8) industrialized countries in early March. That means taking long-term development measures at the same time as giving immediate relief to people suffering from famine, he said. At the beginning of the year, some 25 million Africans required emergency food aid, but quick relief shipments have since eased the threat of starvation in most countries of Southern Africa. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    279253

    Wanted: a just, humane world.

    Bekele F

    Africa Recovery. 1999 Dec; 13(4):[3] p..

    Within a generation, the world could -- and should -- become a place where every infant is properly nurtured and cared for, where every child receives a quality basic education, and where every adolescent is given the support and guidance he or she needs in the difficult transition to adulthood, says the State of the World's Children 2000, published in December by the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF). Acknowledging the progress made in protecting children over the course of this century and in the decade since the 1989 adoption of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, UNICEF says much more remains to be done. It draws particular attention to three tragedies of which children and women are currently the main victims, largely in the developing world: armed conflict, HIV/AIDS and poverty. And the report adds that women are victims of these ills in disproportionate numbers due to gender discrimination. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.