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  1. 1
    334316

    Global income inequality by the numbers: In history and now. An overview.

    Milanovic B

    [Washington, D.C.], World Bank, Development Research Group, Poverty and Inequality Team, 2012 Nov. [30] p. (Policy Research Working Paper No. 6259)

    The paper presents an overview of calculations of global inequality, recently and over the long-run as well as main controversies and political and philosophical implications of the findings. It focuses in particular on the winners and losers of the most recent episode of globalization, from 1988 to 2008. It suggests that the period might have witnessed the first decline in global inequality between world citizens since the Industrial Revolution. The decline however can be sustained only if countries’ mean incomes continue to converge (as they have been doing during the past ten years) and if internal (within-country) inequalities, which are already high, are kept in check. Mean-income convergence would also reduce the huge “citizenship premium” that is enjoyed today by the citizens of rich countries.
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  2. 2
    035344

    [World population growth and questions of population policy] Rost mirovogo naseleniya i voprosy demograficheskoi politiki

    Isupov A

    Narodonaselenie. 1982; (39):3-20.

    World population trends during the past century are briefly reviewed, and U.N. projections to the year 2000 are presented. Population policy topics that have been discussed at the 1954, 1965, and 1974 World Population Conferences are outlined, with a focus on U.N. socioeconomic surveys. (ANNOTATION)
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