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  1. 1
    292999

    International thinking on population policies and programmes from Rome to Cairo: Has South Africa kept pace?

    Ndegwa DG

    South African Journal of Demography. 1996; 6(1):49-56.

    This paper reviews global thinking on population policy expressed at the world conferences on population matters from 1954 to 1994. The review is complemented by an overview of trends in South Africa that constituted a de jure population policy during the apartheid era. There is also a brief discussion of the Population Green Paper tabled in 1995, aimed at the establishment of a national population policy for South Africa. This is evaluated against the Programme of Action decided on at the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD) held in Cairo, Egypt, in 1994. There is an indication that finally, South Africa can be said to be genuinely moving in the direction of respect for human rights in its population policies in harmony with global convention. In a sense, it is catching up with global trends in the population field after years of isolation resulting from sanctions against the apartheid government. (author's)
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  2. 2
    192675

    The intricacy of demography and politics: the case of population projections.

    Martinot-Lagarde P

    [Unpublished] 2001. Presented at the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, IUSSP, 24th General Conference, Salvador, Brazil, August 18-24, 2001. 17 p.

    The purpose of this paper is to sketch the common lines of development of both the scientific elaboration of world population projections and the international political debate that prepared the ground for such projections and encouraged their development. A partial history of the elaboration of world population projections has already been written. International population debates from the XIX° and XX° centuries are also under scrutiny. But the link between these two developments has not been fully established. The link between projections and politics work both ways. In one direction, projections can contribute to a rationalization of government in the area of economic development, urban planning and so on. They provide societies with a partial view of their future. In the other direction, population projections cannot be undertaken without the help and support of governments and major international organizations. They rely on accurate and detailed censuses. They are costly and time consuming. At both end of the spectrum, there is a need for a global consensus not only within the scientific community and political arenas for population projections to be computed, received and considered as legitimate. More than many other instruments of demographic analysis, the history of world population projections demonstrate these linkages. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    134647

    [Research centers and the teaching of demography] Centri di ricerca e di insegnamento della demographia.

    Maffioli D

    In: Demographie: analyse et synthese. Causes et consequences des evolutions demographiques, Volume 1. Rome, Italy, Universita degli Studi di Roma La Sapienza, Dipartimento di Scienze Demografiche, 1997 Sep. 291-310.

    Various international institutions of demography have played a leading role in research over the years including the Population Division of the UN, the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population, and the Comite International de Cooperation dans les Recherches Nationales in Demographie. Demographic research dates back to the work of J.P. Suessmilch in the 18th century, who first systematized such figures, and it reached its maturity in the second half of the 19th century, when the first International Congress of Demography was held in Paris in 1878, at which the term demography (coined in 1855 by A. Guillard) was officially accepted. In 1927, the separation of demography from statistics was demonstrated on an international level by the first World Population Conference held in Geneva. Margaret Sanger conceived the idea of the conference declaring that unchecked population growth could profoundly alter human civilization. In 1928, the International Union for the Scientific Investigation of Population was founded affirming the autonomy of demography. Population Index was founded in 1933, followed by various national demographic journals. Demography, the present organ of the Population Association of America, was founded in 1964, and Population and Development Review in 1974. After the second World War, a period of impasse set in, but during the 1950s and 1960s academic studies flourished, especially those preoccupying politicians and the public: the low fertility in the UK and France, international migration in the US, and above all, the growth of global population, primarily in the Third World. Intervention programs were formulated by specialized UN organizations (FAO, UNESCO, UNFPA) whose activities continue in conjunction with the research efforts of over 600 research centers worldwide.
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  4. 4
    065944

    The International Union for the Scientific Study of Population and population policy research, 1954-1987.

    McNicoll G

    In: International transmission of population policy experience. Proceedings of the Expert Group Meeting on the International Transmission of Population Policy Experience, New York City, 27-30 June 1988, compiled by United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. New York, New York, United Nations, 1990. 74-84. (ST/ESA/SER.R/108)

    The International Union for the Scientific Study of Population and Population Policy Research (IUSSP) is the main organization devoted to international scholarly attention on population issues. As such, they are concerned with the transmission of policy-relevant findings from social science research, social history, and demographic research. This paper examines IUSSP's changing relations with governments and the United Nations during its 60-year history. By reviewing its experiences, it is hoped that important lessons will be learned from IUSSP's successes and failures in influencing population policy matters. Consideration of these lessons will help indicate how social science research may make future contributions toward the improvement of population policy. The policy problems of high-fertility countries undergoing demographic transition are examined. Problems of post- transition societies are not considered.
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  5. 5
    072268

    Contributions of the IGU and ICA commissions in population studies.

    Nag P

    POPULATION GEOGRAPHY. 1989 Jun-Dec; 11(1-2):86-96.

    This paper surveys the contributions of the International Geographic Union (IGU) and the International Cartographic Association (ICA) to the field of population studies over the past 3 decades. Reviewing the various focal themes of conferences sponsored by the organizations since the 1960s, the author examines the evolution of population studies in IGU and ICA. During the 1960s, IGU began holding symposia addressing the issue of population pressure on the physical and social resource in developing countries. However, it wasn't until 1972, at a meeting in Edmonton, Canada, when IGU first addressed the issue of migration. But since then, migration has remained on the the key concerns of IGU. In 1978, the union hosted a symposium on Population Redistribution in Africa -- the first in a series of conferences focusing on the issue of migration. As an outgrowth of migration, the IGU also began addressing the related issue of population education. The interest in migration has continued through the 1980s. In addition to studies of regional migration, the IGU has also focused on conceptual issues such as migrant labor, environmental concerns, women and migration, and urbanization. In 1984, IGU began cooperating with ICA in the areas of census cartography and population cartography. The author concludes his review of IGU and ICA activities by discussing the emerging trends in population studies. The author foresees a more refined study of migration and more sophisticated population mapping, the result of better study techniques and the use of computer technology.
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  6. 6
    042478

    The Population Commission and IUSSP.

    Lebrun M; Brass W

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1986; (19-20):115-24.

    The United Nations (UN) and the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP) have cooperated since the 1940s. In 1927 an International Population Conference in Geveva established a permanent Population Union to cooperate with the population activities of the League of Nations. The 2 institutions' successors, IUSSP and the United Nations (UN), developed close and productive linkages, collaborating to create a Multilingual Demographic Dictionary, published in English, French, Russian, and Spanish and in many other languages. Meanwhile the Union, at the request of UNESCO, prepared a pioneering study attempting to define the cultural factors affecting developing country fertility in the context of the demographic transition, In 1966 the Union and the UN collaborated to develop criteria for internationally comparable studies in fertility and family planning (FP). The resulting monograph served as a reference for many fertility studies, including the World Fertility Survey. Another study on the impact of FP programs on fertility, resulted in the organization of expert meetings and the production of a manual and monographs on FP program evaluation. There was futher cooperation in a study on mortality, internal migration and international migration, resulting in manuals on methods of analysing internal migration and indirect measures of emigration, among other things. The 1954 Wold Population Conference (WPC) and the 1965 UN WPC were organized by the UN collaborating with the Union, and the Union administered the funds used to bring developing country delegates to the Conference. Subsequent WPCs at Bucharest and Mexico City were political in nature, bu the Union contributed to both a report outlining demographic research needs. The Union also assisted the UN in organizing a series of regional population conferences, and its Committee on Demographic Instruction prepared a report for UNESCO on teaching demography, and cooperated with the Secretariat in funding the UN Regional Demographic Training Centers at Bombay and Santiago.
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  7. 7
    042482

    The Population Commission and CICRED.

    Bourgeois-Pichat J

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1986; (19-20):125-8.

    The Committee for International Co-operation in National Research in Demography (CICRED) was formed in 1972 as a result of an initiative taken by the Director of the Population Division of the United Nations Secretariat, and currently holds consultative status with the Economic and Social Council Among its accomplishments are the organization of seminars on demographic research in relation to population growth targets and on infant mortality in relation to the level of fertility, and demographic research in relation to internal migration. CICRED was also instrumental in gaining the co-operation of national research institutions in a project resulting in the publication of 56 national monographs. In cooperation with the population Division, CICRED prepared and published 2 editions of a population multilingual thesaurus. This collaboration also led to the creation of the Population Information Network (POPIN). In 1977 CICRED launched the Inter-center Co-operative research Program. The various elements of the program are in different stages of completion. In particular, they involve cooperation with the Population Division in the areas of intergration of demographic variables into planning, aging and differential mortality. (author's modified)
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  8. 8
    247433

    [Contribution of Hungarian demographic science and Hungarian demographers to the work of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population] A magyar demografiai tudomany es a magyar demografusok hozzajarulasa a Nemzetkozi Nepessegtudomanyi Unio munkajahoz

    Horvath R

    Demografia. 1984; 27(1):51-76.

    The author describes the development of demography in Hungary from 1928 to the present, with a focus on the contribution of Hungarian demographers to the activities of the International Union for the Scientific Study of Population (IUSSP). This paper is part of an IUSSP project that deals with the history of the Union and involves the preparation of papers on such activities in several countries. (summary in ENG, RUS) (ANNOTATION)
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