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  1. 1
    172494

    Planned Parenthood Federation of Thailand addresses domestic violence.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    [London, England], IPPF, 2002 Oct 18. 2 p.

    This news article traces the progress of the Planned Parenthood Association of Thailand's efforts in addressing the issue of domestic violence against women and children since its pilot study in 1997. Its focus on reproductive health (RH) services has expanded to include training, counseling and services on sexual and RH, family planning, HIV/AIDS and sexually transmitted infections, women's empowerment, promotion of male responsibility and services for adolescents.
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  2. 2
    134630

    Protecting the world's children: the story of WHO's immunization programme.

    Bland J; Clements J

    WORLD HEALTH FORUM. 1998; 19(2):162-73.

    In 1796, English country doctor Edward Jenner demonstrated that scratching cowpox virus onto the skin produced immunity against smallpox. Following this scientific demonstration, the practice of vaccination gradually became widespread during the 19th century, and began to be applied to other infections. However, the use of vaccines was largely confined to the industrialized countries. Immunization played no significant role in the World Health Organization's (WHO) early activities. In 1974, however, WHO launched its Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) with the goal of immunizing all of the world's children against diphtheria, pertussis, tetanus, measles, poliomyelitis, and tuberculosis. At that time, only less than 5% of all children had been immunized against the diseases. The word "expanded" referred to the addition of measles and poliomyelitis to the vaccines then being used in the immunization program. Now, 80% of the world's children receive such protection against childhood diseases during their first year of life, coverage could reach 90% by 2000, vaccines are becoming more effective, and vaccines against additional diseases are being added to the program.
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