Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    064994

    Report of the Global Commission on AIDS Third Meeting, Geneva, 22-23 March 1990.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Commission on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1990. [4], 18 p. (GPA/GCA(3)/90.11)

    The member of the Global Commission on AIDS (GCA) convened on March 22-23, 1990 to explore the issue of drug use and HIV infection, review prevention activities, and identify critical issues for AIDS prevention and control in the early 1990s. This document provides a full account of each session including the names of the presenters, the information shared, and the discussions that followed. In the session about drug use and HIV infection, the problem was identified as being "truly global" because the sharing of injection equipment occurs everywhere. Some of the reasons cited for sharing equipment are initiation into intravenous drug use, social bonding, and practicality. Rapid spread of HIV has been seen in New York City, several Italian cities, Edinburgh, and Bangkok. Characteristically, it has taken only 3-5 years after the introduction of HIV for about 50% of injecting drug users (IDU) to be infected. Several studies have demonstrated that behavior change can lower the risk of transmission and infection rates. Amsterdam, Innsbruck, Seattle, and Stockholm had all achieved stabilization of their prevalence of HIV among IDUs at levels between 10-30%. It was emphasized that the means for behavior change must be provided for education to have an impact. The discussion of prevention activities featured the use of education, information, and communication (IEC) programs to execute mass campaigns, focus interventions, and provide monitoring and evaluation. Specific prevention activities discussed were condom usage, outreach to persons with sexually transmitted diseases, and blood safety. There were separate presentations on the status of blood transfusion programs and vaccine development. 10 issues were identified by the GCA that warrant priority attention in the early 1990s. These critical issues are research, complacency and abatement of a sense of urgency, preservation and protection of human rights and legal issues, equity of access, human sexuality, women and AIDS, AIDS as a disease affecting families, HIV/AIDS and drug use, economic and social implications of HIV/AIDS, and the collation and improvement of data.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    076116

    Looking for the "male pill".

    Herndon N

    NETWORK. 1992 Aug; 13(1):20-3.

    Researchers are pursuing 2 approaches to developing a male contraceptive drug. 1 approach centers around suppression of sperm production the other around blocking conception. Researchers are looking at introducing hormonal contraceptives into men's bodies via injections or implants to stop sperm production. Both forms of these possible male contraceptives will not be available for many years, however. A WHO study on testosterone enanthate of men in 7 countries reveals total suppression of sperm production occurred in almost all the Asian men, but only about 60% suppression occurred in other ethnic groups. A current WHO study is examining whether a hormonal contraceptive which is not 100% effective can be useful if it would be more effective than barrier methods. The Population Council is conducting research on 2 capsule implants with 1 capsule releasing luteinizing hormone releasing hormone 13 to halt sperm production while the other releases an androgen to maintain sex drive. Animal tests indicate complete contraception with no side effects. The other possible means of suppressing sperm production is administration of a cottonseed oil extract called gossypol which appears to stop sperm production thereby eliminating the need for concurrent androgen administration. Yet it does cause potassium depletion in some men which can result in arrhythmias. An antifertility vaccine comprises the 2nd approach. Several US researchers are exploring an antifertility vaccine to produce antibodies only to the specialized sperm surface needed to attach to the egg. The 1st antifertility vaccine would probably be in pill form and a woman's contraceptive since it is earlier to target the smaller number of sperm in the oviduct than in the testes.
    Add to my documents.