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  1. 1
    314919

    The global AIDS crisis, "3 by 5", and a renewed commitment to primary health care. WHO, World Social Forum, 2004.

    McClure C; Grubb I; Singh A; Villar E

    Contact. 2004 Jan; (177-178):20.

    On September 2003 at the United Nations General Assembly, the new Director General of the World Health Organization, Dr. Lee, stated: "The AIDS treatment gap is a global public health emergency. We must change the way we think and change the way we act. Business as usual means watching thousands of people die every single day." To address this AIDS treatment crisis, WHO and UNAIDS have committed to leading the "3 by 5" initiative, which targets delivering antiretroviral treatment (ART) to 3 million people in developing countries by the end of 2005. As evident from the experience in industrialized countries since 1996, access to ART has turned HIV/AIDS into a manageable condition, dramatically reducing mortality and morbidity, and allowing people living with HIV/AIDS to live productive, healthy lives. However, in developing countries, these drugs are currently available to only a fraction of those in need. WHO launched the "3 by 5" strategy in December 2003, basing the key elements of the strategy on information gained from numerous pilot programmes that show that it is feasible to provide ARTs in even the very poorest of settings. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    293468
    Peer Reviewed

    A note on co-ordinating the AIDS crisis: issues for policy management and research.

    Anand P

    International Journal of Health Planning and Management. 1997; 12:149-157.

    This note seeks to sharpen our understanding of co-ordination and its significance in healthcare management by offering a picture of an activity where information, incentives and the mixing of various (professional and other) cultures are key. The research design was policy driven, and concentrated on incentives, decision-making and information gathering/ dissemination activities particularly between individuals working across different types of organizations. Data are drawn from 40 primary interviews with mostly senior staff from organizations in two countries, USA and Thailand, internal and external corporate documents, over 1000 items from a Reuters database of news items, newspaper articles and press releases, as well as secondary academic articles. The interviews, which lasted from between 20 min to more than 3 h over two visits, constitute the main source of evidence for the issues discussed below. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    044906

    Vector control in primary health care. Report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group on Vector Control in Primary Health Care

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1987; (755):1-61.

    This is a WHO technical report reviewing how control of disease vectors may be integrated into the primary health care system. The concept of vector is defined broadly as any primary or intermediate invertebrate or vertebrate host or animal reservoir of human disease. The section headings are: present magnitude and status of vector control; means of delivering vector control in primary health care at the community level; communication, feedback and epidemiology; suitability of specific control measures for primary health care; human resource development and the core concept; research topics and recommendations. It is estimated that the size of the problem is hundreds of millions of cases of vector-born disease, with malaria, chagas disease, schistosomiasis, filariasis probably leading the list. Recent efforts on the community level, in Africa for example, have garnered enthusiastic support of villagers, while many nationally sponsored programs on the Health Department level have been less effective. Dozens of specific examples of how vectors may be controlled at the household and village level are cited. Some of these are bed-nets, repellents, aerosols and fumigants, fly traps, water filters, clean-up, biological control agents such as larvivorous fish . In many cases the peridomestic hosts are inhabiting man-made environments, such as thatched roofs, poorly stored food or discarded containers. The primary health care model includes planning at the local level, intersectorial cooperation, and a district management team. Information flow should involve use of the microcomputer and simple flow charts or algorithms, to facilitate feedback between the core group in the central government and the local district health management team. The operations aspects of vector control are emphasized, in both the research needs and the broad agenda of recommendations that end the report.
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  4. 4
    038721

    WHO Expert Committee on Tuberculosis: ninth report.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expert Committee on Tuberculosis

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1974; (552):1-40.

    This document represents the work of a World Health Organization (WHO) Expert Committee on Tuberculosis, which met in Geneva in 1973. Chapters in this volume focus on epidemiology, Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG) vaccination, case finding and treatment, national tuberculosis programs, research, WHO activities in this field, and the activities of the International Union against Tuberculosis and voluntary groups. The Committee emphasized that tuberculosis still ranks among the world's major health problems, particularly in developing countries. Even in many developed countries, tuberculosis and its sequelae are a more important cause of death than all the other notifiable infectious diseases combined. The previous WHO report, issued in 1964, set forth the concept of a comprehensive tuberculosis control program on a national scale. The implementation of this approach has encountered many problems, including deficiencies in the health infrastructure of many countries (shortages of financial, material, and physical resources and a lack of trained manpower) and resistance to change. However, many countries have instituted comprehensive programs and tuberculosis control has become a widely applied community health activity. A priority will be control of pulmonary tuberculosis. The Committee stressed that national programs must be countrywide, permanent, adapted to the expressed demands of the population, and integrated in the community health structure. Steps involved in setting up such programs include planning and programming, selection of technical policies, implementation, and evaluation. Research priority areas identified by the Committee include epidemiology, bacteriology and immunology, immunization, chemotherpy, the systems analysis approach to tuberculosis control, and training methods and instructional materials.
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  5. 5
    041441

    Fourth programme report, 1983-1984.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1985. 101 p. (WHO/CDD/85.13)

    The Diarrheal Diseases Control (CDD) Program, initiated in 1978, is a priority program of WHO for attainment of the goal of Health for All by the Year 2000. Its primary objectives are to reduce diarrheal disease mortality and morbidity, particularly in infants and young children. This report describes the activities undertaken by the Program in the 1983-1984 biennium. During this period, the Program collaborated with more than 100 countries in the implementation of national diarrheal disease control and research activities. The biennium has witnessed a growing interest of other international, bilateral, and nongovernmental agencies in diarrheal disease control; their financial support and commitment have contributed in a large measure to furthering the development of CDD programs and related research in many countries. During the biennium, the services component continued to expand both the quantity and scope of its activities at global, regional, and national levels. This is readily seen from the increase in global acess to Oral Rehydration Salts (ORS) packets from less than 5% in 1981 to 21% in 1983. Other significant developments were a substantial increase in the number of countries planning and implementing programs and the initiation of a new management course in supervisory skills. Successful implementation of national primary health care systems was recognized as necessary for the achievement of the Program's objectives. Efforts of both developing and industrialized countries must continue in a joint endeavor to reduce the problem of diarrheal diseases, especially cholera, the most severe diarrheal disease. The following areas are discussed: the health services component; the research component; information services; program review bodies; program resources and obligations; and program publications and documents for 1983-1984.
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  6. 6
    046823

    The state of the world's children 1988.

    Grant JP

    Oxford, England, Oxford University Press, 1988. [9], 86 p.

    The 1988 UNICEF report on the world's children contains chapters describing the multi-sectorial alliance to support child health, the current emphasis on ORT and immunization, the effect of recession on vulnerable children, family rights to knowledge of basic health facts, and support for women in the developing world. Each chapter is illustrated by graphs. There are side panels on programs in specific countries, including Senegal, Syria, Colombia, Bangladesh, Turkey, India, Honduras, Japan and Southern Africa, and highlighted programs including immunization, AIDS, ORT, breast-feeding and tobacco as a test of health. The SAARC is a new regional organization of southern Asian countries committed to immunization and other health goals. Tables of health statistics of the world's nations, divided into 4 groups by "Under 5 Mortality Rate" present basic indicators, nutrition/malnutrition data, health information, education, literacy and media data, demographic indicators, economic indicators and data pertaining to women. The absolute numbers of child deaths had fallen to 16 million in 1980, from 25 million in 1950. Saving children's lives will not exacerbate the population problem because, realizing that their children will survive, families will have fewer children. Furthermore, the methods used to reduce mortality, such as breast feeding and empowerment of families to control their lives, are known to reduce fertility.
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  7. 7
    045499

    The lessons learnt.

    Henderson DA

    WORLD HEALTH. 1987 Aug-Sep; 8-11.

    The implications of the fact that it was concerted global effort that eradicated smallpox are discussed. The primary reason why the effort succeeded is that specific measurable goals and time deadlines were built in. The 10-year goal was met in 9 years 9 months 26 days. Universal political commitment, including provision of funds by WHO and by constituent countries, was required. A strategy of 80% vaccination and surveillance and containment of outbreaks, followed by certification of eradication, was adhered to. Whether the smallpox campaign could be used as a template for eradicating other diseases is discussed. The biology of smallpox makes it a unique candidate for eradication, while no other disease shares all of its qualifications, such as having only a human host. Lessons have been learned for control of other diseases, however. With regard to the concept of primary health care for all, the smallpox effort showed that finite, specific programs are better supported than basic health services. The eradication demonstrated the power of good leadership and common goals supported by an international institution.
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  8. 8
    270701

    WHO: reaching out to all.

    Williams G

    WORLD HEALTH FORUM. 1988; 9(2):185-99.

    This article explains how the concept of health for all developed within the context of the history of the World Health Organization (WHO). By the early 1970s a new idea was taking shape in WHO. Medical services were failing to reach vast numbers. Health would have to emerge from the people themselves. In the heat of discussion the new strategy was clarified and given a name--primary health care (PHC). An ambitious target was set for it--no less than health for all by the year 2000. It was decided that the community itself had to be involved in planning and implementing its own health care. A new type of health worker was called for, chosen by the people from among themselves and responsible to the community but supported by the entire health system. In virtually all countries, the emphasis on curative care would have to be balanced by an equal emphasis on prevention. Almost 90% of WHO's Member States were prepared to share with one another detailed information about the problems facing their health systems. Industrial countries were beginning to realize that sophisticated medical technology was no guarantee of good health and that health for all through PHC offered an alternative. Millions of health workers have been trained, extending services to low-income groups that had no access to modern health care. Among health professionals, lack of understanding of the PHC concept and insufficient concern for social equity remain the principal constraints. Another problem is that expenditure on health care tends to be viewed as a drain on scarce resources rather than as an investment in the nation's future. The mommentum of health for all can be sustained only by governments implementing at home the policies they have collectively agreed on at The World Health Assembly in Geneva.
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  9. 9
    041353

    Global overview: the Expanded Programme on Immunization, Cartagena, Colombia, 14-16 October 1985.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    [Unpublished] 1985. 15 p.

    This paper reviews the development of the global Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) initiative, reports on program progress since the 1984 EPI conference, and identifies actions needed to meet the goal of providing immunization services to all children of the world by 1990. The central EPI strategy to date has been to deliver immunization in consonance with other health services, particularly those aimed at mothers and children. The long-term goal of such efforts is to strengthen the health infrastructure so as to ensure the continuous provision of immunization and other primary health care services. Simply by reinforcing existing health services, a coverage level of 60-70% will be achieved in developing countries by 1990. If universal coverage is to be achieved, external funds will have to be provided to meet operational costs and train national managers. Acceleration of existing efforts constitutes the main EPI priority at present. Specific areas suggested for immediate action include provision of information about immunization at every health contact; a reduction in the drop-out rates between 1st and last immunization; increased attention to the control of measles, poliomyelitis, and neonatal tetanus; improved immunization services to the disadvantaged in urban areas; and, where appropriate, acceleration of the EPI through approaches such as national immunization days. Ongoing actions that need to be pursued include strengthening disease surveillance and outbreak control, reinforcing training and supervision, and pursuing applied research and development. Overall, management capacity within national programs remains the most severe constraint for the EPI.
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  10. 10
    040872

    Expanded Programme of Immunization Eastern Mediterranean Region. A report for the EPI Global Advisory Group Meeting, Alexandria, 21-25 October 1984.

    Sulieman O

    [Unpublished] 1984. 10, [8] p. (EPI/GAG/84/WP.7.a)

    The strategy adopted by the Members States of the Eastern Mediterranean Region (EMR) to achieve the objective of the promotion of the Expanded Program of Immunization (EPI) through primary health care (PHC) concentrates on strengthening synergistic integration of EPI with other services. Activities have been planned and implemented or are being implemented at the Regional Office and at the country level. 21 countries of the Region now have either a full-time or part-time manager or an EPI focal point. This is a considerable development, for in 1982 there were EPI managers in 9 countries. Except for 3 countries, all national EPI managers/focal points have received senior level training in EPI. At delivery points, vaccination is performed to a large extent by multipurpose health workers, but full-time vaccinators are available in about 6 countries. All field workers have received training at their respective regional levels. Limited financial resources continue to be 1 of the primary constraints of the program in the Region. Plans to resolve this problem include: counteracting wastage factors; close collaboration with the UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) and other international agencies at the country level to standardize approaches and avoid overlap; tapping regional and international voluntary agencies to increase their contributions; and increased use of associate experts, UN volunteers, and national technical staff. The overall information system is to some extent weak and suffers from irregularity and a lack of continuity. Regular reports are received from 9 countries which have World Health Organization staff. Repeated requests from other countries yield incomplete and at times contradicting data. Research efforts are directed towards operational areas, and research in strategies, integration, community, and surveillance areas is being encouraged.
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  11. 11
    044731

    AIDS: the global impact.

    Mann J

    Washington, D.C., Academy for Educational Development, 1986 Dec. 14 p. (25th Anniversary Seminar Series)

    This paper, delivered as part of the Academy for Educational Development's 25th Anniversary Seminar Series, outlines the World Health Organization (WHO) view of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) as a public health problem of paramount international importance. AIDS is transmitted sexually, through blood, and from mother to child. The combination of sexual and perinatal transmission allows identification of sexually active, pregnant women as a group at potential risk. There are currently about 36,000 reported cases of AIDS throughout the world, of which 30,000 are from the Americas. Overall, the AIDS cases come from 78 countries representing all continents. A major question for the future concerns the situation in Asia, where there are currently a small number of cases. The only strategy for preventing AIDS is monogamous sex with single partners over long periods of time, without prostitution and intravenous drug abuse. AIDS particularly threatens the health gains that have been achieved in the developing world and its control must be anchored in the context of primary health care. WHO is aggressively pursuing the function on coordinating the international exchange of information on AIDS. WHO is, in addition, helping countries to organize their own national AIDS prevention and control programs. The solution to the AIDS crisis will be a blend of technological and social advances, and the cutting edge will be education. WHO projects that US$1.5 billion/year will be required to conduct the WHO component of the global campaign against AIDS.
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  12. 12
    043909
    Peer Reviewed

    An economic evaluation of "health for all".

    Patel M

    HEALTH POLICY AND PLANNING. 1986 Mar; 1(1):37-47.

    This economic analysis assesses the probable costs of implementing various activities of the World Health Organization's (WHO's) global strategy of "health for all by the year 2000" and the likelihood that developing countries will be able to afford these costs, either on their own or with the assistance of developed countries. If this policy is to be transformed into concrete results, there must be a plan complete with budgetary requirements, planned activities, and expected results specified in adequate detail. The overall costs of the activities proposed by the global strategy would amount to approximately 5% of the gross national product of most developing countries, with water supplies and primary health care comprising the most expensive activities. Although there is a good match between estimated resource requirements and planned activities, the desired outcomes are often unlikely to result from the activities proposed. At present, all 25 industrial market and nonmarket industrial developed countries have already achieved the outcome goals of the global strategy; however, these countries account for only 25% of the world's population. Of the 63 middle-income countries, 54 have already achieved a gross national product per capita of over US$500, but only 22 have an infant mortality rate better than 50/1000. Very few low-income countries are close to reaching their targets for income, infant mortality, life expectancy, or literacy. On the basis of current trends, 25-33% of countries are considered unlikely to achieve the outcome goals by the year 2000. In general, it appears that expenditure targets are too low to cover the needed health services activities. Further research on the costs of health promoting activities such as immunization and primary health care should be given high priority.
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  13. 13
    041364

    Expanded Programme on Immunization progress report by the Director-General.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Unpublished] 1978 Mar 31. Presented to the Thirty-first World Health Assembly provisional agenda item 2.6.10. 13 p. (A31/21)

    This report summarizes progress in 1977-78 in the planning and implementation of the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI). The EPI's long-term objectives are: 1) to reduce morbidity and mortality from diphtheria, pertussis, measles, poliomyelitis, and tuberculosis by providing immunization against these diseases to every child in the world by 1990; 2) to promote countries' self-reliance in the delivery of immunization services within the context of comprehensive health services; and 3) to promote regional self-reliance in matters of vaccine quality control and production. The present EPI program strategy is to develop managerial competence at the senior and middle levels to serve as a foundation for solid, enduring program implementation. Regional and national authorities have been made a part of the global planning process. An EPI Global Advisory Group has been established to assist in operational implementation, develop prototype training curricula and educational materials, develop and transfer appropriate technologies, establish a 2-way information system to obtain global data on the target diseases, and attract and coordinate extrabudgetary resources. Recent training activities have included a course on EPI planning and management, middle management training at the national level, training in cold chain management, and preparation of an EPI field manual. Research and development efforts have focused on improving the equipment used in the cold chain. Work continues on the development of more stable, more potent, less reactogenic vaccines. 42 developing countries, in which a total of 57 million children are born every year, have been identified as expanding their immunization programs in active collaboration with the World Health Organization. As more countries actively expand their immunization coverage, a larger level of resource input will be required to sustain this expansion.
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  14. 14
    034877

    Toward 2000: the quest for universal health in the Americas.

    Acuna HR

    Washington, D.C, Pan American Health Organization, 1983. x, 145 p. (Scientific Publication No. 435)

    This document, prepared by the Pan American Health Organization (PAHO), reviews health in the Americas in the period 1905-47, provides a more detailed assessment of progress in the health sector during the 1970s, and then outlines prospects for the period 1980-2000 in terms of meeting the goal of health for all by the year 2000. The main feature of this goal is its comprehensiveness. Health is no longer viewed as a matter of disease, but as a social outcome of national development. Attainment of this goal demands far-reaching socioeconomic changes, as well as revision of the concepts underlying national health systems. It seems likely that the coming period in Latin America and the Caribbean will be characterized by intense urban concentration and rapid industrialization, with a trend toward increasing heterogeneity. If current development trends continue, the gap in living standards between urban and rural areas will widen due to sharp differences in productivity. Regionally based development planning could raise living standards and reduce inequalities. In the type of development expected, the role of social services is essential. It will be necessary to determine whether the objective is to provide the poor with access to services that are to be available to all or to provide special services for target groups. The primary health care strategy must be applicable to the entire population, not just a limited program to meet the minimal needs of the extreme poor. Pressing issues regarding health services in the next 2 decades include how to extend their coverage, increase and strengthen their operating capacity, improve their planning and evaluation, increase their efficiency, and improve their information systems. Governments and ministries must be part of effective infrastructures in which finance, intersectoral linkages, community participation, and intercountry and hemispheric cooperation have adequate roles. One of PAHO's key activities must be systematic monitoring and evaluation of strategies and plans of action for attaining health for all.
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  15. 15
    034048
    Peer Reviewed

    Joint UNICEF/WHO consultation on primary health care in urban areas.

    Lancet. 1986 Jan 25; 1(8474):223.

    This article summarizes the conclusions and recommendations of a joint UNICEF/WHO consultation on primary health care in urban areas. The meeting, which was held in Guayaquil, Ecuador, in October 1984, was attended by representatives from 9 countries: Brazil, Colombia, Ecuador, Ethiopia, Guatemala, India, Philippines, Republic of Korea, and Peru. 5 priorities were emphasized: the need for comprehensive rather than partial coverage, the use of simple 1st-line remedies such as oral rehydration, the reallocation of resources, intersectoral and interinstitutional collaboration, and the supporting responsibility of governments and international agencies. Community participation is an essential component of primary health care. Once the process of community development is launched, the balance within the existing health care system must be adjusted to prepare for the explosive tempo of urbanization. Cities, regions, and countries must move with sustained determination toward full primary health care coverage for the urban poor. Ongoing close collaboration between UNICEF and WHO is of great importance to the future of primary health care. Specifically, the consultation recommended: 1) consciousness raising activities to make governments, the world public, international organizations, and nongovernmental organizations aware of the scale of the need; 2) continuing support to projects and the informal network of people dedicated to the development of primary health care and the subsequent transformation of health systems; and 3) help with scaling up the health care system.
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  16. 16
    033687

    Demographic trends and their development implications.

    United Nations. Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific [ESCAP]

    In: Third Asian and Pacific Population Conference (Colombo, September 1982). Selected papers. Bangkok, Thailand, Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific, 1984. 9-40. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 58)

    This report summarizes the recent demographic situation and considers prospective trends and their development implications among the 39 members and associate members of the Economic and Social Commission for Asia and the Pacific (ESCAP). It presents data on the following: size, growth, and distribution of the population; age and sex structure; fertility and marriage; mortality; international migration; growth and poverty; food and nutrition; households and housing; primary health care; education; the working-age population; family planning; the elderly; and population distribution. Despite improvements in the frequency and quality of demographic data collected in recent years, big gaps continue to exist in knowledge of the demographic situation in the ESCAP region. Available evidence suggests that the population growth rate of the ESCAP region declined between 1970 and 1980, as compared with the preceding decade, but that its rate of decline was slow. Within this overall picture, there is wide variation, with the most developed countries having annual growth rates around 1% and some of the least developed countries having a figure near 3%. The main factors associated with the high growth rates are the past high levels of fertility resulting in young age structures and continuing high fertility in some countries, notably in middle south Asia. The population of countries in the ESCAP region is expected to grow from 2.5 billion in 1980, to 2.9 billion in 1990, and to 3.4 billion persons by the year 2000. This massive growth in numbers, which will be most pronounced in Middle South Asia, will occur despite projected continuing moderation in annual population growth rates. Fertility is expected to continue its downward trend, assuming a more widespread and equitable distribution of health, education, and family planning services. Mortality is expected to decline further from its current levels, where life expectancy is often at or around 50 years. In several countries, more than 10 in every 100 babies born die before their 1st birthday. The extension of primary health care services is seen as the key to reducing this figure. Rapid population growth and poverty tend to reinforce each other. Low income, lack of education, and high infant and child mortality contribute to high fertility, which in turn is associated with high rates of natural increase. High rates of natural increase feed back to depress socioeconomic development. High population growth rates and their correlates of young age structures and heavy concentrations of persons in the nonproductive ages tend to depress production and burden government expenditure with high costs for social overhead needs. Rapid population growth emerges as an important factor in the persistence of chronic undernutrition and malnutrition. It increases the magnitude of the task of improving the educational system and exacerbates the problem of substandard housing that is widely prevalent throughout Asia.
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  17. 17
    033365

    United Nations Children's Fund: report of the Executive Board (15-26 April 1985).

    UNICEF. Executive Board

    New York, New York, United Nations, 1985. v, 58 p. (Economic and Social Council Official Records, 1985. Supplement No. 10; E/1985/31; E/ICEF/1985/12)

    The major decisions of the UN Children's Fund Executive Board in their 1985 session were to: approve several new program recommendations and endores a major emergency assistance program for several African countries; approve initiatives to accelerate the implementation of child survival and development actions, particularly towards the goal of achieving universal immunization of children against 6 major childhood diseases by 1990; adopt a comprehensive policy framework for UN International Children's Emergency Fund (UNICEF) programs concerning women; approve UNICEF revised budget estimates for 1984-85 and budget estimates for 1986-87; and make a number of decisions on ways to improve the administration and the role of the Board. The Board members both reported on and heard evidence of the encouraging results of recent efforts to implement national child survival and development programs. Reports of the successful immunization campaigns in Burkina Faso, Colombia, El Salvador, and Nigeria were welcomed, along with the news that half a million children were saved during the year through the use of oral rehydration therapy. Stronger efforts were encouraged to improve results in the areas of breastfeeding and growth monitoring. Implementation issues in connection with child survival and development actions were a continuing focus of Board attention during the session. The accelerated implementation of child survival and development actions was accorded the highest priority in approving the medium-term plan for 1984-88. The Board also adopted a resolution that sought to draw the attention of world leaders, during their observance of the 40th anniversary of the UN, to the importance of reaffirming their commitment to accelerate the implementation of the child survival and development resolution and realizing universal immunization by 1990. Delegations commended the results of the World Health Organization/UNICEF joint nutrition support program but noted that malnutrition among women and children appeared to be increasing. Water supply and sanitation activities were encouraged, and the Board stressed that those actions should be linked with health and hygiene education. The Board endorsed the report on recent UNICEF activities in Africa. Many delegations spoke in support of the increased aid to Africa. Major emphasis was given to linking emergency responses with ongoing UNICEF programs. The Board approved new multi-year commitments from general resources totalling $303,053,422 for 28 country and interregional programs and noted 32 projects totaling $223,215,000 to be funded from specific-purpose contributions. The Board stressed the importance of ensuring that child survival and development actions were integrated with continuing efforts in other of UNICEF action. The Board approved a commitment of $252,550,443 for the budget for the biennium 1986-87.
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  18. 18
    268455

    Health for all by the year 2000: strategies.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]

    Washington, D.C., Regional Office of the World Health Organization, 1980. x, 189 p. (Official Document No. 173)

    The World Health Assembly decided in 1977 that the main social target of the Governments and the WHO in the decades ahead should be "the attainment by all the citizens of the world by the year 2000 of a level of health that will permit them to lead a socially and economically productive life." Subsequently, the World Health Assembly in 1979 urged the member states to define and implement national, regional, and global strategies for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000. This monograph reprints UN documents dealing with this goal. The 1st document addresses 2 specific issues, the developments in the health sector in the 1971-1980 decade, and strategies for attaining the goal of health for all by the year 2000. The 2nd document addresses 8 areas of interest; 1) social and environmental aspects of the region of the Americas; 2) evaluation of the 10-year health plan for the Americas; 3) implications of the goal and the new international economic order for the achievement of the objectives; 4) a method for analyzing strategies and developing a primary health care work plan and indicators for evaluating progress towards the goal; 5) objectives for the health and social sectors; 6) regional baseline targets for priority health conditions; 7) summary of revised regional strategies for attaining the goal; 8) national, intercountry, regional, and global implications of the regional strategies. The 3rd and 4th documents are resolutions 20 and 21 of the 27th meeting of the directing council of the Pan American Health Organization. Resolution 20 addresses regional strategies for attaining the goal. Resolution 21 discusses the ad hoc working group to complement the regional strategies.
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  19. 19
    268274

    The World Health Organization's Expanded Programme on Immunization: a global overview. Le Programme Elargi de Vaccination de L'Organization Mondiale de la Sante: apercu mondial.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Expanded Programme on Immunization [EPI]

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1985; 38(2):232-52.

    In recognition that immunization is an essential element of primary health care, the World Health Organization (WHO), with other agencies, is sponsoring the Global Program on Immunization whose goal is to reduce morbidity and mortality from vaccine-preventable diseases by providing immunization for all children of the world by 1990. A global advisory group of experts meets yearly to review the program. This paper summarizes the most salient features of the 1984 meeting. The major event for the Expanded Program on Immunization (EPI) in 1984 was the Bellagio Conference on protecting the world's children. Activities undertaken as a result of this conference are discussed. 1 outcome was the formation of the Task Force for Child Survival whose main objective is to promote the reduction of childhood morbidity and mortality through acceleration of key primary health care activities. Focus is on supporting Colombia, India and Senegal in accelerating the expansion of their immunization programs and strengthening other elements of primary health care, such as diarrheal diseases control, family planning and improved nutrition. The 5-point action program consists of the following components: promoting EPI within the context of primary health care; investing adequate human resources in EPI; ensuring that programs are continuously evaluated and adapted so as to achieve high immunization coverage and maximum reduction in target-disease deaths and cases; and pursuing research efforts as part of program operations. EPI has continued to collaborate with other programs to help assure that immunization services are provided to support delivery of other services. Integration of EPI in Africa, the Americas, the Eastern Mediterranean Region, Europe, the South-East Asia Region, and the Western Pacific Region is examined.
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  20. 20
    032279
    Peer Reviewed

    Traditional birth attendants: a resource for the health of women.

    Belsey MA

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 1985 Sep; 23(4):247-8.

    The WHO is certain that the health of mothers and babies can be improved by giving traditional birth attendants (TBAs) special training and support to enable them to carry out their activities with greater safety. This is probably one of the most cost effective approaches to reducing maternal and infant mortality and morbidity. Some workers, however, stress that this approach is inappropriate to the real needs of the impoverished majority. They believe that the real causes of mortality are socioeconomic deprivation, top managerial incompetence and mass illiteracy. In addition to TBA training the WHO suggests strengthening the referral and support system and improvement and wide spread use of appropriate technologies. TBAs have been most successful when trained for a special skill, such as reducing neonatal tetanus. This supplement shows some of the achievements and problems that still exist. The material is presented to gain better understanding of obstetricians and support for simplified maternity care for mothers and babies in rural areas. Obstetricians can influence decision makers who allocate funds for health care to achieve a more equal distribution of resources. The articles are presented as part of a broader program of collaboration between the WHO and the International Federation of Obstetrics and Gynecology (FIGO) in their common objective of improving the health of women and children based on the principles and programs for primary health care. The 2 organizations have joined to form a WHO/FIGO Task Force for the Promotion of Maternal and Child Health (MCH), including Family Planning (FP), and Primary Health Care. The activities of the Task Force are: to put into effect the specific recommendations of the Joint WHO/FIGO workshop; to promote and support the MCH/FP elements of PHC at the national levels; and to promote the transfer, adaptation and further development of appropriate technologies for pregnancy, perinatal and family planning care.
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  21. 21
    031467

    [Health costs and financing and the work of WHO] Cout et financement de la sante et activities de l'OMS.

    Mach EP

    World Health Statistics Quarterly. Rapport Trimestriel de Statistiques Sanitaires Mondiales. 1984; 37(4):339-50.

    This discussion examines the international responses to issues and problems in the cost and financing of the health sector, focusing on the work of the World Health Organization (WHO). It describes the growth of attention to these concerns beginning in the 1970s, reviews methods and applications of financial analysis in greater detail, and summarizes progress to date and the agenda for work. Emphasis is on the developing countries, for they face the most urgent problems regarding costs and financing, and more attention is directed to their needs for support in this area. By the early 1970s it was clear that progress in health development particularly in the most underprivileged countries was unsatisfactory and that changes were needed if services were to have an appreciable impact on the health problems of developing populations. A major study conducted jointly by the UN Children's Fund (UNICEF) and WHO identified several of the critical problems associated with resources. The essential financial concerns requiring attention in connection with primary health service coverage, the need for more equitable distribution of existing resources for health and the priority of resources allocation to peripheral health services were examined in detail by a WHO Study Group on Financing Health Services which met in 1977. Among the problems of health finance, those of the overall lack of funds, the maldistribution of health resources, rising health care costs, and the lack of coordination were found to be particularly important. The Study Group concluded that, despite difficulties, it was possible to collect information of sufficient reliability for planners' needs and at a modest cost, even for the private sector. To help bring this about, it recommended that research centers and universities, in collaboration with national health authorities of their country, devote considerable attention to data collection methods. The reports, studies, and papers prepared at various meetings deal in general with specific aspects of health cost and financing. A major element, and evolving product, of the meetings and studies related to developing countries was a manual on financing health services, originally based on the recommendations of the 1st Study Group meeting. This draft document served as background material for a series of further meetings and was used to guide many of the country financing studies. A number of other health financing manuals were also developed between 1979-81. In its final published form the WHO manual attempts to be relevant to all developing countries. The manual describes health policies and their financial aspects and outlines techniques for data collection. If the recommendations of the 1st Study Group are compared with the achievements recorded thus far, the following facts come to light: many countries have undertaken surveys of health sector financing and resource allocation; increased interest in this subject has been shown by other international organizations; much progress has been made in the development and refinement of methodologies for collecting and using financial data; international activities and country studies have made it possible to provide reports for country leadership; and issues of financial planning and management often appear in medium and longterm plans.
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  22. 22
    267984

    Proceedings of the International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy, June 7-10, 1983, Washington, D.C.

    Cash RA

    Washington, D.C., Agency for International Development [AID], Bureau for Science and Technology, 1983. 210 p. (International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy, 1983, proceedings)

    With over 600 participants from more than 80 countries, the International Conference on Oral Rehydration Therapy (ICORT) was a testimony to the international health community's recognition of the seriousness of diarrheal disease, the value of oral rehydration therapy, and the commitment to primary health care. The conference, initiated by the Agency for International Development, was cosponsored by the International Center for Diarrheal Disease Research, Bangladesh, the United Nations Children's Fund, and the WHO. The conference focused on oral rehydration therapy, an important treatment of diarrhea. 1 out of 10 children born in developing countries dies from the effects of diarrhea before the age of 5. A 70% reduction in the mortality rate can result from ORT--a major breakthrough for primary health care. Excellent laboratory investigation, well-conducted clinical studies, and careful field observation have led to this effective therapy. Many papers presented at the conference demonstrated the effectiveness of ORT. Participants agreed on the best formula for ORT in terms of electrolyte content and on the need for an international commitment to expand implementation of ORT. Problems in implementing oral therapy programs are discussed. Possible areas of investigation include: 1) improving the solution through the addition of glycine, other amino acids, or cereal-based substrates; 2) developing methods for teaching ORT; and 3) investigating better methods of program evaluation. Innovative approaches to informing the public about the use and benefits of oral therapy were also discussed. Participants, recognizing that problems are shared among many different programs and nations, exchanged ideas and addresses, pledging to keep each other abreast of their ORT research and implementation efforts. The conference closed with a strong call for action to attain near universal availability of ORT in the next 10 years.
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  23. 23
    029924

    Partners in health.

    Mutalik GS

    World Health. 1985 Mar; 5-7.

    Attainment of health for all by the year 2000 will require increased cooperation between governments, the World Health Organization (WHO), and voluntary health organizations. Voluntary organizations function at many levels. Some are strictly local, some operate nationwide, and others function at the international level. They have developed innovative health programs throughout the world and have developed expertise in confronting and solving a wide range of health problems. Collaboration between WHO, voluntary organizations, and member states was initiated in 1948 at the 1st World Health Assembly. In 1978 in the Declaration of Alma-Ata, WHO, voluntary organizations, and member states jointly identified the components and goals of primary health care, and in 1979, at the 32nd World Health Assembly they jointly launched the health for all by 2000 movement. The technical discussions scheduled for May 1985, in conjunction with the World Health Assembly will provide an opportunity for promoting further cooperation. At this meeting a number of issues must be resolved if an effective partnership is to emerge. Governments must declare their willingness to share the responsibility of providing health services for their populations and to share resources with the voluntary organizations. Voluntary organizations must declare their willingness to develop programs which are in accordance with the planning goals and priorities of the member states. Both must decide how closely they are willing to work together. Efforts must also be directed toward creating a structural framework for collaboration which will allow the voluntary organizations to participate in the nation's health development without stifling the organizations' albilities to formulate innovative programs and to make flexible responses to local conditions. The ability of governments and organizations to work cooperatively is being demonstrated in countries around the world. For example, in 1 Asian country, a voluntary organization is using its knowledge of local conditions to promote community acceptance of the government's malaria control program. In Africa, a joint effort to implement primary health care is being undertaken by several international voluntary organizations, the governments of 6 countries, and WHO. The degree to which cooperative bonds such as these are forged during the next few years will determine whether the world's goals for the year 2000 will be met.
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  24. 24
    029936
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and "Health for All".

    Morrison AB

    Health Affairs. 1985 Spring; 4(1):102-13.

    To illustrate the breadth of the work carried out by the World Health Organization (WHO), the author describes 5 diverse WHO programs: The Special Program for Research and Training in Tropical Diseases, the Diarrheal Diseases Control Program, the Expanded Program on Immunization, the Drug Action Program, and the Onchocerciasis Control Program in the Volta River Basin. In addition, WHO has been deeply committed to the development and implementation of primary health care, particularly in developing countries. The size and scope of global health problems, ineffective management by national governments, illiteracy, poverty, and population growth constitute major challenges for WHO and impede efforts to translate the slogan "health for all by the year 2000" into action. The curative medicine orientation of the medical profession, cuts in public spending, the emphasis in development work on a monosectoral rather than an intersectoral approach, and lack of community commitment comprise further obstacles. In comparison with some other United Nations organizations, WHO has been able to withstand endeavors to politicize the organization. WHO has further been able to establish cooperative working relationships with multinational pharmaceutical companies in the development of new drugs and vaccines. It is concluded that WHO provides a unique service to the world community and has acted as an international conscience, stimulating developed countries to recognize their responsibilities to developing nations.
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  25. 25
    028281

    Doctors--barefoot and otherwise. The World Health Organization, the United States, and global primary medical care.

    Mullan F; Bryant JH

    Jama. 1984 Dec 14; 252(22):3146-8.

    The international effort to provide primary health care (PHC) services for all by the year 2000 requires the development of appropriate manpower resources in the developing countries. Given the limited health budgets of developing countries, research on manpower development is necessary to ensure that funds for manpower development are used in the most efficient manner. In recognition of this need, the World Health Organization (WHO) and the International Organization for Medical Sciences convened a workshop, entitled "Health for All - A Challenge to Health Manpower Development Research" in Ibadan, Nigeria in 1982. The participants at the workshop agreed that manpower development strategies must be developed in the context of PHC, and that the current manpower development strategies in most developing countries do not provide the type of manpower required in PHC systems. Specifically, the workshop recommended that health manpower development strategies must 1) take into account the fact that health improvement is dependent not just on health services but on improvements in sanitation, water, housing, and nutrition; 2) recognize that PHC systems require an extensive cadre of health workers, paramedics, and auxiliary personnel, and that PHC systems are not highly physician dependent; and 3) recognize that medical schools must train physicians capable of serving the needs of the entire population rather than just the needs of the elite few. Participants also recognized that the development of effective strategies may be hindered by various professional, technical, financial, and bureaucratic factors. Given the pressing needs and scarce resources of developing countries, manpower development research must be highly policy oriented. The recommendations of the workshop were endorsed by WHO's Advisory Committee on Medical Research in 1983 and then distributed to WHO's 6 regional offices. The regional offices are currently discussing the recommendations with individual countries in an effort to determine how each country can implement the recommendations. The success of the effort to train appropriate manpower will require the assistance of developed countries and especially the US. The US can assist by providing training in US institutions for individuals from developing countries. Training programs, however, must be reoriented in such a way as to equip students to work in PHC settings. Medical personnel from the US can provide technical assistance in the developing countries, but efforts must made to ensure that this assistance is directed toward the development of PHC prsonnel and services.
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