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  1. 1
    044906

    Vector control in primary health care. Report of a WHO Scientific Group.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Scientific Group on Vector Control in Primary Health Care

    WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION TECHNICAL REPORT SERIES. 1987; (755):1-61.

    This is a WHO technical report reviewing how control of disease vectors may be integrated into the primary health care system. The concept of vector is defined broadly as any primary or intermediate invertebrate or vertebrate host or animal reservoir of human disease. The section headings are: present magnitude and status of vector control; means of delivering vector control in primary health care at the community level; communication, feedback and epidemiology; suitability of specific control measures for primary health care; human resource development and the core concept; research topics and recommendations. It is estimated that the size of the problem is hundreds of millions of cases of vector-born disease, with malaria, chagas disease, schistosomiasis, filariasis probably leading the list. Recent efforts on the community level, in Africa for example, have garnered enthusiastic support of villagers, while many nationally sponsored programs on the Health Department level have been less effective. Dozens of specific examples of how vectors may be controlled at the household and village level are cited. Some of these are bed-nets, repellents, aerosols and fumigants, fly traps, water filters, clean-up, biological control agents such as larvivorous fish . In many cases the peridomestic hosts are inhabiting man-made environments, such as thatched roofs, poorly stored food or discarded containers. The primary health care model includes planning at the local level, intersectorial cooperation, and a district management team. Information flow should involve use of the microcomputer and simple flow charts or algorithms, to facilitate feedback between the core group in the central government and the local district health management team. The operations aspects of vector control are emphasized, in both the research needs and the broad agenda of recommendations that end the report.
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  2. 2
    268324

    Parasites of all types must be controlled.

    Solon FS

    Joicfp Review. 1985 Oct; 10:44.

    The primary health care program in the Philippines today officially includes only the control of parasites which cause malaria and schistomiasis. Dr. Solon suggests that equal emphasis should be given to the control of all types of parasites. This paper presents excerpts from an interview with Dr. Solon. He expresses his opinion that in the past 20 years infant mortality has decreased markedly. In 1985, it was reduced to 58/1000 live births. He attributes this to a political will to support the health ministry in the implementation of its programs. The efforts to implement primary health care (PHC) has resulted in receiving the Kawaski Award given by Japan and the World Health Organization (WHO) to a country successfully implementing PHC. JOICFP has demonstrated the approaches used in the integration of family planning, nutrition and parasite control. Dr. Solon hopes that the integrated project would pave the way for the control of parasites other than schistostomiasis and malariasis. Less attention has been paid to the control of helminths such as ascaris, bookworm, trichuris t. and roundworm, which are common in the Philippines. Worms may cause deadly diseases such as pneumonia and bronchitis. JOICFP has shown that in several project areas in the country, use of the right personnel, equipment and anthelmintics can result in controlling these parasites.
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