Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 32 Results

  1. 1
    374578

    HIV and young people who inject drugs.

    Armstrong A; Baer J; Baggaley R; Verster A; Oyewale T

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2015. 34 p.

    Key populations at higher risk of HIV include people who sell sex, men who have sex with men (MSM), transgender people and people who inject drugs. Young people who belong to one or more of these key populations – or who engage in activities associated with these populations – are made especially vulnerable to HIV by factors including widespread discrimination, stigma and violence, combined with the particular vulnerabilities of youth, power imbalances in relationships and, sometimes, alienation from family and friends. These factors increase the risk that they may engage – willingly or not – in behaviours that put them at risk of HIV, such as frequent unprotected sex and the sharing of needles and syringes to inject drugs. This brief aims to inform discussions about how best to provide health services, programmes and support for young people who inject drugs. It offers a concise account of current knowledge concerning the HIV risk and vulnerability of young people who inject drugs; the barriers and constraints they face to appropriate services; examples of programmes that may work well in addressing their needs and rights; and approaches and considerations for providing services that both draw upon and build the strengths, competencies and capacities of young people who inject drugs.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    374577

    Minimum standards for prevention and response to gender-based violence in emergencies.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2015 Nov. 101 p.

    Gender based violence is a life-threatening, global health and human rights issue that violates international human rights law and principles of gender equality. In emergencies, such as conflict or natural disasters, the risk of violence, exploitation and abuse is heightened, particularly for women and girls. UNFPA’s “Minimum Standards for Prevention and Response to GBV in Emergencies (GBViE)” promote the safety and well being of women and girls in emergencies and provide practical guidance on how to mitigate and prevent gender-based violence in emergencies and facilitate access to multi-sector services for survivors.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    384431
    Peer Reviewed

    Countdown for health to the post-2015 UN Sustainable Development Goals.

    Brolan CE; Hill PS

    Medical Journal of Australia. 2015 Apr 6; 202(6):289-90.

    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    334946
    Peer Reviewed

    The ghosts of user fees past: Exploring accountability for victims of a 30-year economic policy mistake.

    Rowden R

    Health and Human Rights. 2013 Jun; 15(1):175-185.

    Today, there is an unmistakable shift in international consensus away from private health financing, including the use of user fees toward public financing mechanisms (notably tax financing), to achieve universal health coverage (UHC). This is, however, much the same as an earlier consensus reached at the WHO's World Health Assembly at Alma-Ata in 1978. When considering the full circle journey from Alma-Ata in 1978 to today’s re-emerging support for UHC, it is worth taking stock and reflecting on how and why the international health community took this nearly three decade detour and how such misguided policies as user fees came to be so widely implemented during the intervening period. It is important for the international health community to ensure that steps are taken to compensate victims and determine accountability for those responsible. Victims of user fees suffered violations of their human right to health as enshrined in Universal Declaration, ICESCR, and a number of other human rights treaties, and yet still cannot avail themselves of remedies, such as those provided by international and regional human rights fora or the various United Nations treaty-monitoring bodies, and the responsible institutions and individuals have thus far remained unaccountable. This lack of accountability suggests a degree of impunity for international organizations and health economists dispensing with health policy advice. Such a lack of accountability should be noted with concern by the international health community as it increasingly relies on the advice and direction of health economists. Steps must be taken to provide survivors of user fees with compensation and hold those responsible to account.
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    332969

    Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes: a sourcebook for health professionals. Module on HIV / AIDS.

    Coll-Black S; Lindsay E; Bhushan A; Fritsch K

    [Manila, Philippines], World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2008. [126] p.

    This module is designed to improve the awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals on poverty and gender concerns in the field of HIV / AIDS. Experience increasingly shows that the socioeconomic factors contributing to the rapid spread of HIV in the Region include low education, limited access to health care services and increased mobility within and between countries -- factors that are largely determined by poverty and gender inequality. The growing commitment to curbing the HIV / AIDS epidemic requires that health professionals at community, provincial, national and international levels have the knowledge, skills and tools to more effectively respond to the health needs of poor and marginalized people and address the gender inequalities fuelling the epidemic. However, many health professionals in the Region are not adequately prepared to address these issues. This module is designed to help fill this gap.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    332612

    Strong ministries for strong health systems. An overview of the study report: Supporting Ministerial Health Leadership: A Strategy for Health Systems Strengthening.

    Omaswa F; Boufford JI

    [Kampala], Uganda, African Centre for Global Health and Social Transformation [ACHEST], 2010 Jan. [32] p.

    This overview is adapted from the report Supporting Ministerial Health Leadership: A Strategy for Health Systems Strengthening by Dr. Francis Omaswa, executive director and founder of The African Center for Global Health and Social Transformation (ACHEST) and Dr. Jo Ivey Boufford, president of The New York Academy of Medicine (NYAM). The study and report were commissioned by the Rockefeller Foundation to explore the feasibility of establishing a support mechanism for ministers and ministries of health especially in the poorest countries, as part of the Foundation’s Transforming Health Systems initiative, The study was initially designed to assess the potential value of three proposed programs to strengthen the leadership capabilities of ministers of health: a global executive leadership program for new ministers; an ongoing, regional, in-person and virtual leadership support program for sitting ministers; and a virtual global resource center for ministers and high level ministerial officials providing real-time access to information. During the course of the study, it became clear that it was essential to expand the inquiry to better understand the challenges and needs of ministries as a whole, as they and their ministers provide the stewardship function for country health systems.The content of the report was derived from six major activities:a comprehensive literature review of the theory and practice of effective leadership development and organizational capacity building, and an environmental scan to identify any existing or planned leadership development programs for ministers of health or any that have occurred in the recent past globally; a survey of the turnover of ministers of health; targeted interviews with ministers, former ministers, and key stakeholders who interact with them, conducted between October 2008 and September 2009, to better understand the roles of ministers and ministries, the challenges they face, resources at their disposal, and their thoughts on what additional resources might enhance their personal effectiveness and that of their ministries; a consultative meeting of experts and stakeholders held in Bellagio, Italy part way through the project; participation of the project leaders (Omaswa and Boufford) in relevant global and regional meetings, as well as individual meetings about the project with critical leaders in international and donor organizations and potential champions of this effort; and a consultation with African regional health leaders to discuss the final report, held in Kampala, Uganda. (Excerpt).
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    321141

    Adolescent pregnancy -- unmet needs and undone deeds. A review of the literature and programmes.

    Neelofur-Khan D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [109] p. (WHO Discussion Papers on Adolescence; Issues in Adolescent Health and Development)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has been contributing to meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by according priority attention to issues pertaining to the management of adolescent pregnancy. Three of the aims of the MDGs - empowerment of women, promotion of maternal health, and reduction of child mortality - embody WHO's key priorities and its policy framework for poverty reduction. The UN Special Session on Children has focused on some of the key issues affecting adolescents' rights, including early marriage, access to sexual and reproductive health services, and care for pregnant adolescents. This review of the literature was conducted to identify (1) the major factors affecting the pregnancy outcome among adolescents, related to their physical immaturity and inappropriate or inadequate healthcare-seeking behaviour, and (2) the socioeconomic and political barriers that influence their access to health-care services and information. The review also presents programmatic evidence of feasible measures that can be taken at the household, community and national levels to improve pregnancy outcomes among adolescents. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    309915

    In the public interest: health, education, and water and sanitation for all.

    Emmett B; Green D; Lawson M; Calaguas B; Aikman S

    Oxford, England, Oxfam International, 2006. 122 p.

    This report shows that developing countries will only achieve healthy and educated populations if their governments take responsibility for providing essential services. Civil society organisations and private companies can make important contributions, but they must be properly regulated and integrated into strong public systems, and not seen as substitutes for them. Only governments can reach the scale necessary to provide universal access to services that are free or heavily subsidised for poor people and geared to the needs of all citizens -- including women and girls, minorities, and the very poorest. But while some governments have made great strides, too many lack the cash, the capacity, or the commitment to act. Rich country governments and international agencies such as the World Bank should be crucial partners in supporting public systems, but too often they block progress by failing to deliver debt relief and predictable aid that supports public systems. They also hinder development by pushing private sector solutions that do not benefit poor people. The world can certainly afford to act. World leaders have agreed an international set of targets known as the Millennium Development Goals. Oxfam calculates that meeting the MDG targets on health, education, and water and sanitation would require an extra $47 billion a year. Compare this with annual global military spending of $1 trillion, or the $40 billion that the world spends every year on pet food. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    293735

    A global struggle for health rights.

    Latham MC

    SCN News. 2006; (31):49-50.

    Many circumstances around the world are working against the provision of health care to those in greatest need: the US occupation of Iraq; the Israeli wall isolating Palestinian communities; widespread spraying of herbicides in Colombia in the war against drugs, and before that in Vietnam; genocide in Sudan's Darfur region; discrimination against aboriginals in Australia, against tribal peoples in Asia, and indigenous populations in the Andes; millions of HIV-infected people, particularly in Africa; and the lack of health insurance coverage for underprivileged Americans. These populations suffer from one common effect--they experience serious health and nutritional consequences, particularly for children and women. In July 2005, as a WABA delegate, I attended the second People's Health Assembly held in the beautiful historic city of Cuenca, Ecuador. The first Assembly in Bangladesh in 2000 recognized the goals embodied in the "Declaration of Alma Ata." This latter international assembly, held in the former Soviet Union, was sponsored by WHO and unanimously called for "Health for All by 2000." (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    303858

    Putting human rights at the centre of HIV / AIDS strategies.

    Robinson M

    Choices. 2004; 6.

    HIV/AIDS has reached the proportion of a pandemic because human rights continue to be violated on a massive scale. During my term as UN High Commissioner for Human Rights, and in the years since, I have seen first-hand how these rights violations fuel the spread of HIV/AIDS. I have met with women in rural areas across Africa who feared losing their homes and being rejected by their families due to their actual or suspected HIV status. I will never forget the elderly man I met in Delhi who was refused hospital treatment for a broken hip because he was HIV positive, or the discrimination against the gay, lesbian and transsexual community recounted to me by a group in Argentina, every one of whom had a personal story of rejection and hardship. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    303750

    We Care. Around the world.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. We Care

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2003]. 16 p.

    The 22 country offices where the We Care programme has been rolled out are taking great strides in making their workplaces truly AIDS competent. We are beginning to understand that HIV/AIDS is not 'out there' but among us -- and that if we are to make a difference in the way the world responds to it, WE MUST BEGIN WITH OURSELVES. Today, the We Care initiative is a global programme aiming at creating HIV/AIDS competence in all country offices, regional offices and headquarters by end of 2005. We Care is promoted together with initiatives spearheaded by other UN agencies, including 'Caring for Us' by UNICEF, the joint Access to Treatment and Inter-Organisational Needs (ACTION) programme facilitated by the UN Secretariat and the 'HIV/AIDS in the Workplace' initiative by WFP and ILO. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    303749

    We Care. What you and your family should know.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]. We Care

    New York, New York, UNDP, [2003]. 16 p.

    We often assume that as UN employees, especially at Headquarters, we are somehow immune. Immune to being infected or affected by HIV/AIDS, immune from stigma and discrimination, immune from needing care, counselling, testing or treatment. But the truth is, we are as vulnerable as everyone else in society, and just like everyone else, we need to make informed decisions when it comes to HIV and AIDS. We need to be educated, we need to know how we can protect ourselves and how we can have a better quality of life if we happen to be living with HIV. We need to know that we have access to care and treatment and the right to confidentiality and non-discrimination in the workplace. In addition, as UN employees we have a special role to play. Before we can share with the world how HIV/AIDS should be addressed, we need to look into ourselves. Are we really that well informed, that sensitive? Can we talk openly to our co-workers about HIV/AIDS? Are we really sure that we will not be stigmatized if we happen to be living with HIV? Are we afraid of working closely with someone living with HIV? Do we discuss our anxieties and concerns within our families, with our partners, friends and co-workers? The We Care initiative addresses these issues. It helps us recognize that HIV/AIDS is not only 'out there' but also among us. And that if we are to create an environment that is empowering and respectful of the rights and responsibilities of every individual, we must first begin with ourselves. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    299642
    Peer Reviewed

    A human rights approach to the WHO Model List of Essential Medicines.

    Seuba X

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2006 May; 84(5):405-411.

    Since the first WHO Model List of Essential Medicines was adopted in 1977, it has become a popular tool among health professionals and Member States. WHO's joint effort with the United Nations Committee on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights has resulted in the inclusion of access to essential medicines in the core content of the right to health. The Committee states that the right to health contains a series of elements, such as availability, accessibility, acceptability and quality of health goods, services and programmes, which are in line with the WHO statement that essential medicines are intended to be available within the context of health systems in adequate amounts at all times, in the appropriate dosage forms, with assured quality and information, and at a price that the individual and the community can afford. The author considers another perspective by looking at the obligations to respect, protect and fulfil the right to health undertaken by the states adhering to the International Covenant of Economic, Social and Cultural Rights (ICESCR) and explores the relationship between access to medicines, the protection of intellectual property, and human rights. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    287659

    The ICASO Plan on Human Rights, Social Equity and HIV / AIDS.

    Garmaise D

    Toronto, Canada, International Council of AIDS Service Organizations [ICASO], 1998 Jun. 16 p.

    Over the past few years, the International Council of AIDS Service Organizations (ICASO) and its component networks and organizations have undertaken a process to determine how best to highlight human rights activities within the work it does on HIV/AIDS. This process included the ICASO Inter-Regional Consultation on Human Rights, Social Equity and HIV/AIDS, which was held in Toronto, Canada, in March 1998. This consultation constituted the first ever international meeting specifically focussing on HIV/AIDS and human rights, social equity and community networking issues. The plan described in this document is an important milestone in this process. It is part of ICASO’s ongoing efforts to provide a framework that will be useful in the work of community-based HIV/AIDS organizations. The consultation also formally endorsed the International Guidelines on HIV/AIDS and Human Rights issued by the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) and the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner on Human Rights. Participants to the Consultation believe that the Guidelines provide a platform for the development of activities and initiatives, including advocacy education. Community-based organizations (CBOs) would need to prioritize and select specific issues they feel are critical to their efforts in prevention of HIV/AIDS, and in the care and support of those living and affected by HIV/AIDS. Section 2.0 of the document describes the links between human rights and HIV/AIDS. Section 3.0 outlines a framework for the work ICASO will be doing over the next several years in the area of human rights, social equity and HIV/AIDS. The framework consists of guiding principles, role statements, goals, objectives, activities and structures. The framework has been prepared primarily from a global perspective. Finally, Section 4.0 contains work-plans from three of the five regions of ICASO (Asia/Pacific, Africa, and Latin America and the Caribbean) showing how human rights issues will be incorporated into their work. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    192149

    The right to know. New approaches to HIV testing and counselling.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of HIV / AIDS

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. [4] p.

    The changing face of the HIV/AIDS epidemic has resulted in new opportunities, as well as new imperatives, to increase access to HIV testing and counselling and to knowledge of HIV status. Increased access to care and treatment, and decreased stigma and discrimination in many settings present important new opportunities associated with taking an HIV test. The fact that more and more of those infected with HIV need care and treatment based on knowledge of HIV status indicates new imperatives. HIV testing and counselling services must keep pace with the new opportunities if the increasing benefits of knowing your HIV status are to be accessed (see Box One). New approaches to HIV testing and counselling must now be implemented in more settings, and on a much larger scale than has so far been the case. WHO is advocating that health-care workers should offer testing and counselling to all those who might benefit from knowing their HIV status, and then benefit from advances in the treatment and prevention of HIV infection and HIV related diseases. As such benefits increase, there is an onus on national governments to provide good-quality testing and counselling services. The time has now come to implement HIV testing and counselling more widely using existing health-care settings, moving beyond the model of provision that relies entirely upon concerned individuals seeking out help for themselves to permit broader access for all. In this new approach, such services will become a routine part of health care, for example during attendance at antenatal clinics, or at diagnosis and treatment centres for tuberculosis and sexually transmitted infections (STIs). (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    281068

    Reproductive health strategy to accelerate progress towards the attainment of international development goals and targets.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2004. [36] p. (WHO/RHR/04.8)

    Reproductive and sexual health is fundamental to individuals, couples and families, and the social and economic development of communities and nations. Concerned about the slow progress made in improving reproductive and sexual health over the past decade, and knowing that the international development goals would not be achieved without renewed commitment by the international community, the Fifty-fifth World Health Assembly adopted resolution WHA55.19 requesting WHO to develop a strategy for accelerating progress towards attainment of international development goals and targets related to reproductive health. The resolution recalled and recognized the programmes and plans of action agreed by governments at the International Conference on Population and Development (Cairo, 1994) and the United Nations Fourth World Conference on Women (Beijing, 1995), and at their respective five-year follow-up review conferences. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    182215
    Peer Reviewed

    Poverty, equity, human rights and health. [Pauvreté, équité, droits de l'Homme et santé]

    Braveman P; Gruskin S

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2003 Jul; 81(7):539-545.

    Those concerned with poverty and health have sometimes viewed equity and human rights as abstract concepts with little practical application, and links between health, equity and human rights have not been examined systematically. Examination of the concepts of poverty, equity, and human rights in relation to health and to each other demonstrates that they are closely linked conceptually and operationally and that each provides valuable, unique guidance for health institutions’ work. Equity and human rights perspectives can contribute concretely to health institutions’ efforts to tackle poverty and health, and focusing on poverty is essential to operationalizing those commitments. Both equity and human rights principles dictate the necessity to strive for equal opportunity for health for groups of people who have suffered marginalization or discrimination. Health institutions can deal with poverty and health within a framework encompassing equity and human rights concerns in five general ways: (1) institutionalizing the systematic and routine application of equity and human rights perspectives to all health sector actions; (2) strengthening and extending the public health functions, other than health care, that create the conditions necessary for health; (3) implementing equitable health care financing, which should help reduce poverty while increasing access for the poor; (4) ensuring that health services respond effectively to the major causes of preventable ill-health among the poor and disadvantaged; and (5) monitoring, advocating and taking action to address the potential health equity and human rights implications of policies in all sectors affecting health, not only the health sector. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    182047

    Human development report 2003. Millennium Development Goals: a compact among nations to end human poverty.

    United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]

    New York, New York, Oxford University Press, 2003. xv, 367 p.

    The central part of this Report is devoted to assessing where the greatest problems are, analysing what needs to be done to reverse these setbacks and offering concrete proposals on how to accelerate progress everywhere towards achieving all the Goals. In doing so, it provides a persuasive argument for why, even in the poorest countries, there is still hope that the Goals can be met. But though the Goals provide a new framework for development that demands results and increases accountability, they are not a programmatic instrument. The political will and good policy ideas underpinning any attempt to meet the Goals can work only if they are translated into nationally owned, nationally driven development strategies guided by sound science, good economics and transparent, accountable governance. That is why this Report also sets out a Millennium Development Compact. Building on the commitment that world leaders made at the 2002 Monterrey Conference on Financing for Development to forge a “new partnership between developed and developing countries”—a partnership aimed squarely at implementing the Millennium Declaration—the Compact provides a broad framework for how national development strategies and international support from donors, international agencies and others can be both better aligned and commensurate with the scale of the challenge of the Goals. And the Compact puts responsibilities squarely on both sides: requiring bold reforms from poor countries and obliging donor countries to step forward and support those efforts. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    170210

    Making the transition work for women in Europe and Central Asia.

    Lazreg M

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1999 Dec. viii, 113 p. (World Bank Discussion Paper No. 411; Europe and Central Asia Gender and Development Series)

    This collection of papers was selected from the proceedings of the World Bank conference held on June 7-8, 1999 in Washington District of Colombia. The conference entitled, "Making the Transition Work for Women in Europe and Central Asia," underlined the importance of gender as a factor influencing change during the shift from a command to a market economy. Women, who were invited to the conference, from Europe spoke directly to the World Bank about their problems and to make suggestions for action. In addition, scholars from the US and Britain were also invited to express their views on the gender dimension of transition. It was pointed out that the transition is taking place without the input of women, who are consequently suffering from the change. The participants also agreed the changes also caused men to engage in domestic violence, thus causing additional problems for women. The feminization of poverty and trafficking in women were also identified as new problems that demand to be addressed. In view of these problems, the participants advised that reforms were necessary but should proceed with caution.
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    165365

    Report of the meeting of PHA / NGOs and UNAIDS, 16-19 July 1995, Geneva.

    Lucas S; Senturias E; Burzynski R

    [Unpublished] 1995. [32] p.

    People living with HIV/AIDS (PHA), nongovernmental organizations (NGOs), and representatives from the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS (UNAIDS) met in Geneva in July 1995 to discuss ways to collaborate. This meeting report provides a synthesis of the discussions and work accomplished over those four days, including ideas emanating from the plenary and working group sessions. The meeting was developed in two parts: the first two days were for discussions among the PHA/NGO participants, and the second two days for consultation between the PHA/NGOs and UNAIDS. The issues discussed include access to care and support, human rights, enabling community voices to be heard at all levels, greater involvement of PHA, information and global leadership, women’s participation, development strategies that focus on egalitarianism, and communications.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    164758

    A charade of concern: the abandonment of Colombia's forcibly displaced. [Falsa inquietud: el abandono de los colombianos desplazados por la fuerza]

    Myers H; Sommers M

    New York, New York, Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children, 1999 May. 24 p.

    The armed conflict in Colombia has forced more than 1.5 million Colombian citizens to flee their homes and communities. Caught in a nightmare of violent conflict with no prospects for reconstructing their former lives, hundreds of thousands of mostly rural peasants have found no option but to join the ranks of the internally displaced. It is noted that despite the extraordinary dimensions of the displacement phenomenon, the issue has remained a silent crisis. During November 29-December 10, 1998, the Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children sent a delegation to Colombia to assess the conditions of women, children and adolescents uprooted by war and violence. The objectives of the delegation were to: 1) report on the scale of the displacement crisis; 2) determine to what extent the specific needs of women and children were being addressed by the government and international humanitarian relief; and 3) raise awareness among policymakers and among donor agencies of the status, rights and needs of women and children. Overall, the delegation found evidence of a seriously deprived displaced population which receives alarmingly low levels of humanitarian support and only minimal recognition of their plight from national and international agencies and governments. Thus, this paper also provides recommendations for ameliorating this crisis.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    157416

    Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children.

    Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children

    WIN. WOMEN'S INTERNATIONAL NETWORK NEWS. 2001 Spring; 27(2):87.

    The Women's Commission for Refugee Women and Children is one of the leading advocacy and expert resource organizations speaking out on behalf of refugee and displaced women, children, and adolescents around the world. However, there was a growing concern among women working in refugee and human rights organizations that refugee women and children had specific rights that were not being recognized or respected. The UN High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) released its Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women in 1991 to address a growing concern that the protection needs of refugee women were not being met in the field. The Women's Commission serves as a watchdog and an expert resource, offering solutions and providing technical assistance. Professional staff travel to refugee camps, detention centers, and slum areas to conduct field research and technical training and to convene meetings. In addition, the Women's Commission sends fact-finding delegations of professional women to meet with refugee women and children around the world and learn firsthand of needs and conditions. The Women's Commission has proven effective by taking the lead in advocating and helping to develop the Immigration and Naturalization Service's Guidelines for the Adjudication of Refugee Children's Asylum Claims. It also was a catalyst in the establishment of the Bosnian Women's Fund. In addition, reproductive health services for refugees have improved significantly since the Women's Commission 's 1994 groundbreaking survey.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    146146

    Violence against women (VAW): a key reproductive health concern.

    Tharan C

    FEEDBACK. 1999; 25(1-2):1-4.

    This article discusses violence against women (VAW) as a major reproductive health issue. VAW is now recognized as a violation of human rights and considered a priority public health problem. Serious physical and psychological complications have been attributed to such violence which include unwanted pregnancies, gynecological disorders, disabilities, depression, suicide attempts and other similar patterns. In response to this issue, WHO seeks to establish effective strategies together with other organizations, for preventing violence and decreasing the harm done on abused women. Moreover, a number of actions were recommended at a planning exercise in India, which include sensitizing the medical community to the problem of VAW and training them to recognize it, conducting sensitive action research, and adopting collective strategies such as campaigns against rape and against alcoholism. An outstanding example of a government health sector response is the One Stop Crisis Center: Inter-Agency Management of Battered Women, Rape Survivors and Child Abuse, which was implemented in hospitals in Malaysia. Although the center has been acknowledged as an innovative approach, it has yet to undergo a systematic evaluation and needs to address some pressing issues such as the lack of trained social workers and forensic medical officers.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    142918

    Youth brought energy and sex talk to the Prepcom.

    Malpani S

    WEDO NEWS AND VIEWS. 1999 May; 12(1):6.

    A Youth Forum organized by the United Nations Population Fund in collaboration with the World Population Foundation and the Dutch Council on Youth and Population brought together 132 young people from 108 countries. Some 20 of them formed a Youth Coalition and made it to the International Conference on Population Development (ICPD+5) PrepCom in March. They held press conferences, proposed amendments to the draft text based on the final report of the Youth forum, lobbied diplomats, and joined the Women's coalition. They gained the attention of the media and demanded that governments recognize the reproductive rights of young people as human rights, that sexual health services and education be provided to youth, and that at least 20% of donor allocations to reproductive health programs be earmarked for their needs. However, the youth did not totally succeed in their campaign because right-wing groups contested most proposals related to adolescent reproductive and sexual health education.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    086757

    [International] Covenant on Civil and Political Rights [status].

    United Nations

    In: Multilateral treaties, index and current status, Ninth Cumulative Supplement, compiled by M.J. Bowman and D.J. Harris. Nottingham, England, University of Nottingham Treaty Centre, 1992. 181.

    The following countries became parties to the International Covenant on Civil and Political Rights in 1989-1991: a) Albania, 4 October 1991; b) Algeria, 12 September 1989 c) Burundi, 9 May 1990; d) Estonia, 21 October 1991; e) Grenada, 6 September 1991; f) Haiti, 6 February 1991; g) Ireland, 8 December 1989, h) Israel, 3 October 1991; i) Lithuania, 20 November 1991; j) Malta, 13 September 1990; k) Nepal, 14 May 1991; l) Republic of Korea, 10 April 1990; m) Somalia, 24 January 1990; and n) Zimbabwe, 13 May 1991. The Covenant contains human rights provisions relating to equality of the sexes, freedom of movement, freedom from arbitrary and unlawful interference with the home and family, protection of children and the family, the right to marry and found a family, and equality of spouses within marriages. In addition, the following of the above countries also became parties to the International Covenant on Economic, Social and Cultural Rights on the same dates: Albania, Estonia, Grenada, Haiti, Israel, Lithuania, Malta, Nepal, and Zimbabwe. This Covenant contains human rights provisions relating to equality of the sexes, equal pay for equal work, maternity benefits, housing, education, health care, and protection of the family, children, and mothers. See Multilateral Treaties, Index and Current Status, p. 181.
    Add to my documents.

Pages