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  1. 1
    321141

    Adolescent pregnancy -- unmet needs and undone deeds. A review of the literature and programmes.

    Neelofur-Khan D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2007. [109] p. (WHO Discussion Papers on Adolescence; Issues in Adolescent Health and Development)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has been contributing to meeting the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) by according priority attention to issues pertaining to the management of adolescent pregnancy. Three of the aims of the MDGs - empowerment of women, promotion of maternal health, and reduction of child mortality - embody WHO's key priorities and its policy framework for poverty reduction. The UN Special Session on Children has focused on some of the key issues affecting adolescents' rights, including early marriage, access to sexual and reproductive health services, and care for pregnant adolescents. This review of the literature was conducted to identify (1) the major factors affecting the pregnancy outcome among adolescents, related to their physical immaturity and inappropriate or inadequate healthcare-seeking behaviour, and (2) the socioeconomic and political barriers that influence their access to health-care services and information. The review also presents programmatic evidence of feasible measures that can be taken at the household, community and national levels to improve pregnancy outcomes among adolescents. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    274003

    Gender analysis in health: a review of selected tools.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Gender and Women’s Health

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Gender and Women's Health, 2002. x, 83 p.

    This critical review of tools for gender analysis and their application to health was carried out to support who’s Gender Team in identifying possible strategies for implementing the Gender Policy for who. One component of implementation is providing who staff with support in a) understanding why it is necessary to address the impact of gender on health and health services and b) knowing how to address this impact as it pertains to their own field of work. Since many agencies facing similar tasks have developed tools for mainstreaming gender, it seemed appropriate for the Gender Working Group to consider their usefulness for health rather than immediately embarking on a process of developing its own tools. This review is intended as background for use by anyone working on or interested in gender and health, and particularly by who staff working on gender issues. It assumes an understanding of the who Gender Policy for who, and of the challenges in mainstreaming gender. It is therefore written in a shorthand form, aiming simply to clarify the content of different tools, and to what extent they could be used in support of implementing who’s Gender Policy. There is a complementary volume to this review which is designed as an educational tool for those not necessarily familiar with gender analysis, which provides an overview of gender tools that may be used for integrating gender issues in health. (excerpt)
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