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  1. 1
    332969

    Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes: a sourcebook for health professionals. Module on HIV / AIDS.

    Coll-Black S; Lindsay E; Bhushan A; Fritsch K

    [Manila, Philippines], World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2008. [126] p.

    This module is designed to improve the awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals on poverty and gender concerns in the field of HIV / AIDS. Experience increasingly shows that the socioeconomic factors contributing to the rapid spread of HIV in the Region include low education, limited access to health care services and increased mobility within and between countries -- factors that are largely determined by poverty and gender inequality. The growing commitment to curbing the HIV / AIDS epidemic requires that health professionals at community, provincial, national and international levels have the knowledge, skills and tools to more effectively respond to the health needs of poor and marginalized people and address the gender inequalities fuelling the epidemic. However, many health professionals in the Region are not adequately prepared to address these issues. This module is designed to help fill this gap.
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  2. 2
    293735

    A global struggle for health rights.

    Latham MC

    SCN News. 2006; (31):49-50.

    Many circumstances around the world are working against the provision of health care to those in greatest need: the US occupation of Iraq; the Israeli wall isolating Palestinian communities; widespread spraying of herbicides in Colombia in the war against drugs, and before that in Vietnam; genocide in Sudan's Darfur region; discrimination against aboriginals in Australia, against tribal peoples in Asia, and indigenous populations in the Andes; millions of HIV-infected people, particularly in Africa; and the lack of health insurance coverage for underprivileged Americans. These populations suffer from one common effect--they experience serious health and nutritional consequences, particularly for children and women. In July 2005, as a WABA delegate, I attended the second People's Health Assembly held in the beautiful historic city of Cuenca, Ecuador. The first Assembly in Bangladesh in 2000 recognized the goals embodied in the "Declaration of Alma Ata." This latter international assembly, held in the former Soviet Union, was sponsored by WHO and unanimously called for "Health for All by 2000." (excerpt)
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