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    Global Consultation on the Health Services Response to the Prevention and Care of HIV / AIDS among Young People. Achieving the Global Goals: Access to Services. Technical report of a WHO consultation, Montreux, Switzerland, 17-21 March 2003. A WHO technical consultation in collaboration with UNAIDS, UNFPA, and YouthNet.

    Global Consultation on the Health Services Response to the Prevention and Care of HIV / AIDS among Young People. Achieving the Global Goals: Access to Services (2003: Montreux)

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Department of Child and Adolescent Health and Development, 2004. [80] p.

    Young people (10-24 years) are at the centre of the HIV epidemic in terms of transmission, impact, vulnerability and potential for change. The global goals on young people and HIV/AIDS that have now been endorsed in a wide range of fora reflect both the strong public health, human rights and economic reasons for focusing on young people, and also the concern and commitment of governments around the world to direct resources to the prevention and care of HIV/AIDS among adolescents and youth. In order to contribute to the growing clarity about what needs to be done to achieve these global goals, and to strengthen the collaboration between a range of UN and NGO partners committed to accelerated health sector action, WHO organized a technical consultation on the health services response to HIV/AIDS among young people, in collaboration with UNAIDS, UNFPA, UNICEF, and YouthNet, in Montreux, from 17 to 21 March 2003. The consultation sought to obtain consensus around evidence-based health service interventions for the prevention and care of HIV among young people; effective strategies for delivering these interventions, the essential characteristics of successful programmes; and the strategic partnerships and actions at global and regional levels that will be required to stimulate and support action in countries. It is now widely accepted that the prevention and care of HIV/AIDS among young people will require a range of interventions from a range of different sectors. The health sector itself will be responsible for a number of different interventions, through a range of health system partners. The consultation brought together UN, NGO and academic partners, and provided the opportunity for these diverse actors to review the evidence for action: what was understood by “evidence”, the available evidence about increasing young people’s access to priority services, and what could reasonably be inferred or extrapolated from the available evidence from other age groups. (excerpt)
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