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  1. 1
    332969

    Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes: a sourcebook for health professionals. Module on HIV / AIDS.

    Coll-Black S; Lindsay E; Bhushan A; Fritsch K

    [Manila, Philippines], World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2008. [126] p.

    This module is designed to improve the awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals on poverty and gender concerns in the field of HIV / AIDS. Experience increasingly shows that the socioeconomic factors contributing to the rapid spread of HIV in the Region include low education, limited access to health care services and increased mobility within and between countries -- factors that are largely determined by poverty and gender inequality. The growing commitment to curbing the HIV / AIDS epidemic requires that health professionals at community, provincial, national and international levels have the knowledge, skills and tools to more effectively respond to the health needs of poor and marginalized people and address the gender inequalities fuelling the epidemic. However, many health professionals in the Region are not adequately prepared to address these issues. This module is designed to help fill this gap.
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  2. 2
    326040

    Safe, voluntary, informed male circumcision and comprehensive HIV prevention programming. Guidance for decision-makers on human rights, ethical and legal considerations. Pre-publication.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; AIDS Law Project, South Africa

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2008 Mar. 28 p. (UNAIDS/08.19E / JC1552E)

    Throughout the world, HIV prevalence is generally lower in populations that practise male circumcision than in populations where most men are uncircumcised. This has been observed over the years of the HIV epidemic and has now been confirmed through three randomized controlled trials concluded in 2005-2006. The trials showed that male circumcision reduces by 60% the transmission of HIV from women to circumcised men. The results have led to the conclusion that male circumcision is an effective risk-reduction measure for men, and should be used in addition to other known strategies for the prevention of heterosexually acquired HIV infection in men. (excerpt)
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