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Your search found 19 Results

  1. 1
    333218

    Making reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health a reality for all. Reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health framework.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2008 May. [40] p.

    The Reproductive rights and sexual and reproductive health (SRH) framework has been developed to provide overall guidance and a cohesive- Fund-wide response for implementing the Reproductive Health and Rights elements of the UNFPA Strategic plan 2008-2011. The framework builds on the goals of the International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), 1994; the Millennium Summit, 2000, with its adoption of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs); the 2005 World Summit; and the addition, in 2007, of the goal of universal access to reproductive health to MDG 5, for improving maternal health. This includes two parts: the first provides a snapshot of the progress achieved since ICPD, identifies major remaining gaps and priorities and outlines principles and approaches for programme planning and implementation. The second part identifies key priorities and specific strategies for each of the SRH-related strategic plan outcomes. (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    332969

    Integrating poverty and gender into health programmes: a sourcebook for health professionals. Module on HIV / AIDS.

    Coll-Black S; Lindsay E; Bhushan A; Fritsch K

    [Manila, Philippines], World Health Organization [WHO], Regional Office for the Western Pacific, 2008. [126] p.

    This module is designed to improve the awareness, knowledge and skills of health professionals on poverty and gender concerns in the field of HIV / AIDS. Experience increasingly shows that the socioeconomic factors contributing to the rapid spread of HIV in the Region include low education, limited access to health care services and increased mobility within and between countries -- factors that are largely determined by poverty and gender inequality. The growing commitment to curbing the HIV / AIDS epidemic requires that health professionals at community, provincial, national and international levels have the knowledge, skills and tools to more effectively respond to the health needs of poor and marginalized people and address the gender inequalities fuelling the epidemic. However, many health professionals in the Region are not adequately prepared to address these issues. This module is designed to help fill this gap.
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  3. 3
    330597
    Peer Reviewed

    Improving maternal health to achieve the Millennium Development Goals in the Eastern Mediterranean Region: a youth lens.

    Mahaini R

    Eastern Mediterranean Health Journal. 2008; 14 Suppl:S97-106.

    The fifth Millennium Development Goal (MDG) aims to improve maternal health. The 2 targets set for this goal are to "reduce by three-quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio" and "achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health". Six indicators have been selected to help track progress towards these targets: maternal mortality ratio; proportion of births attended by skilled health personnel; contraceptive prevalence rate; adolescent birth rate; antenatal care coverage (at least 1 visit and at least 4 visits); and unmet need for family planning. This paper briefly outlines the general situation in relation to maternal health in the Eastern Mediterranean Region of the World Health Organization (WHO) and goes on to focus on the perspective of adolescent pregnancy and reproductive health.
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  4. 4
    330589
    Peer Reviewed

    Trips and public health: solutions for ensuring global access to essential AIDS medication in the wake of the Paragraph 6 Waiver.

    Greenbaum JL

    Journal of Contemporary Health Law and Policy. 2008 Fall; 25(1):142-65.

    In 2003, the World Trade Organization (WTO) proposed a waiver to the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights (TRIPS), known as the "Paragraph 6 Waiver," in order to create flexibility for developing countries and to allow easier importation of cheap generic medication. ... To the companies who own pharmaceutical patents, the notion that a government can use their product without the permission of the patent holder seems unfair and counterproductive. ... Canada was one of the first countries to enact legislation for the sole purpose of exporting generic drugs to developing countries and its experience is indicative of the problems presented by compulsory licensing and the Paragraph 6 Waiver. ... Exact amounts and methods for determining remuneration vary but presumably a fair system would compensate patent holders for the loss of their patent rights while maintaining the system's cost effectiveness for countries issuing the compulsory licenses. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    329087

    Guidance on infant feeding and HIV in the context of refugees and displaced populations.

    Lhotska L; McGrath M

    Geneva, Switzerland, United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees [UNHCR], 2008 Apr. 20 p.

    This Guidance on Infant feeding and HIV aims to assist UNHCR, its implementing and operational partners, and governments on policies and decision- making strategies on infant feeding and HIV in refugees and displaced populations. Its purpose is to provide an overview of the current technical and programmatic consensus on infant feeding and HIV, and give guidance to facilitate elective implementation of HIV and infant feeding programmes in refugee and displaced situations, in emergency contexts, and as an integral element of coordinated approach to public health, HIV and nutrition programming. The goal of this guidance is to provide tools to prevent malnutrition, improve the nutritional status of infants and young children, to reduce the transmission of HIV infection from mother to child after delivery, and to increase HIV-free survival of infants.
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  6. 6
    329086

    Scaling up prevention of mother-to-child transmission of HIV.

    Attawell K

    Teddington, United Kingdom, Tearfund, 2008 Jul. 44 p.

    This report provides an overview of PMTCT and is an attempt to explore what is working, and why, in scaling up access. The report captures innovative examples of successful programming and partnerships, while identifying challenges and bottlenecks that must be overcome if these countries are to meet their nationally set universal access targets by 2010. The research methodology used for this report was based on a desk review, interviews with key global informants (see Acknowledgements) and country case studies in Malawi, Nigeria and Zambia in early 2008. The in-country study included semi-structured interviews with representatives of government and nongovernmental organisations as well as focus group discussions with community representatives, participatory and observational methodologies. The main objectives of the research were to: 1) identify and conduct interviews with the key international and national stakeholders and explore the structure, components, implementation, co-ordination, financing, policies, and guidelines and monitoring system of the PMTCT programmes; 2) determine what was working well and why; and 3) identify specific bottlenecks, challenges and recommendations for progress. This report provides an overview of the perceptions of key experts and communities on PMTCT interventions and approaches, current global action and country progress.
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  7. 7
    329551

    Overview of HIV interventions for young people.

    UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund, HIV/AIDS Branch, [2008]. 8 p. (Guidance Brief)

    A series of seven Guidance Briefs has been developed by the Inter- Agency Task Team (IATT) on HIV and Young People1 to assist United Nations Country Teams (UNCT) and UN Theme Groups on HIV/AIDS in providing guidance to their staffs, governments, donors and civil society on the specific actions that need to be in place to respond effectively to HIV among young people. This Brief provides a global overview and is complemented by a separate Brief for most-at-risk young people and five others on HIV interventions among young people provided through different settings /sectors: community, education, health, humanitarian emergencies and the workplace.
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  8. 8
    328213

    The U.S. commitment to global health: recommendations for the new administration.

    United States. Committee on the U.S. Commitment to Global Health. Board on Global Health

    Washington, D.C., The National Academies Press, 2008 Dec 15. [64] p.

    At this historic moment, the incoming Obama administration and leaders of the U.S. Congress have the opportunity to advance the welfare and prosperity of people within and beyond the borders of the United States through intensified and sustained attention to better health. The United States can improve the lives of millions around the world, while reflecting America's values and protecting and promoting the nation's interests. The Institute of Medicine-with the support of four U.S. government agencies and five private foundations-formed an independent committee to examine the United States' commitment to global health and to articulate a vision for future U.S. investments and activities in this area.
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  9. 9
    329490

    Contraception in India: exploring met and unmet demand.

    Gulati SC; Chaurasia AR; Singh RM

    World Health and Population. 2008; 10(2):25-39.

    Our study examines factors influencing demand for contraception for spacing as well as for limiting births in India. Data on socio-economic, demographic and program factors affecting demand for contraception in India are from the National Family Health Survey, 1998--99. The recent document from the National Rural Health Mission has completely ignored the use of contraception in controlling fertility in India. Empirical results of our study suggest giving priority to and focusing attention on supply-side factors such as a regular and sustained supply of quality contraceptive methods to improve accessibility and affordability. Further, strengthening the information, education and communication (IEC) component of the reproductive and child health (RCH) package would allay misapprehensions about the side effects and health risks of contraception. Focusing attention on demand-side factors such as women's empowerment through education, gainful employment and exposure to mass-media would help reduce the unmet demand for family planning. The resulting reduction in fertility would hasten the process of demographic transition and population stabilization in India.
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  10. 10
    329202

    The HIV epidemic: squeezing out the African voice [letter]

    Simms C

    Journal of Internal Medicine. 2008 Nov; 264(5):504-8.

    Had there been a strong African voice contributing to World Bank decisions, it is unlikely that deliberate sidelining of HIV by health sector reforms would have taken place. However, given Bank's architecture and processes, an adequate response to the crisis was a nonstarter; unlike mediocre responses to Africa's other health needs, it has been less easy for the IDC to duck its responsibility and place the blame on its so-called African partners. Nevertheless, the lack of an African voice distorts historical analyses of the crisis often reflecting a western perspective, emphasizing the lack of political will and African governments' failure to act, whilst underplaying the IDC's shortcomings. The notion itself that the epidemic is 25 years old rather than the more accurate 75 years old reflects this distortion. Most of the responsibility rests with the Bank's Board and top management. OED reports that it 'could find no evidence that other top management raised the issue with borrowers or pushed the issue to a higher level internally'. Where there was positive response by the bank at the country level, 'the initiative for AIDS strategies and lending came primarily from individual health staff in the regional and technical operational groupings of the Bank, but not in any coherent way from the Bank's HNP leadership or top-level management. The current initiative by the British House of Commons Committee for International Development to reform the World Bank effectively reverses the notion that the reform was all but impossible because it was a zero sum game. Today, however, its donor members may find the demonstrable unfairness and ineffectiveness less tolerable. It is unlikely that the next president of the Bank will be chosen solely by the United States. Reformers will now need to revise its constitutional rules, their balancing of stakeholder rights, their decision-making rules and practices and their staffing and expertise. The course of the HIV epidemic means that the status quo is no longer acceptable. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    329062

    Wealth and child survival: India and Bangladesh [letter]

    Billal DS; Hotomi M; Yamanaka N

    Lancet. 2008 Oct 25; 372(9648):1459.

    Your Aug 16 Editorial1 emphasises that India is far from its target of reaching Millennium Development Goal 4 on child survival, despite its impressive rate of economic growth compared with the other south Asian nations. You state that India is spending only 3% of its gross domestic product (GDP) on health, which is less than the other countries in the Asia-Pacific region; however, India has actually been spending only 0|9% of its GDP on heath for the past two decades.2 2-3% of GDP is the predicted level of spending by the Indian Government by 2010.2 Although the link between poverty and child mortality is very strong, some countries are better at translating their economic growth into pre venting child deaths. For example, India's gross national income (GNI) per head has in creased by a staggering 82% from US$450 in 2000 to $820 in 2006, yet its child mortality rate only declined by 19% from 94 per 1000 births to 76 per 1000. Over the same period, Bangladesh saw a much smaller 23% in crease in GNI per capita-from $390 in 2000 to $480 in 2006-but its child mortality dropped by 25% from 92 to 69 per 1000 births.3,4 The maternal mortality rate also declined from 440 per 10 000 births in 1997 to 315 in 2001 in Bangladesh.5 All countries, even the poorest, can reduce child mortality if they pursue the right policies and prioritise their poorest families. Good government choices save children's lives but bad ones are a death sentence. (full-text)
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  12. 12
    328854
    Peer Reviewed

    Averting maternal death and disability.

    Fortney JA

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2008 Aug; 102(2):189-90.

    Recent articles in these pages have referred to the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs). These goals were set in 2000 by the General Assembly of the United Nations to be achieved by 2015. While aimed primarily at development and poverty reduction, 3 goals refer to measures of health. Of the 8 goals, the one of interest to this section of IJGO is MDG5, which refers to maternal health: Reduce by three-quarters, between 1990 and 2015, the maternal mortality ratio; Achieve, by 2015, universal access to reproductive health care; A related goal is MDG4, which is to: Reduce by two-thirds, between 1990 and 2015, the under-five mortality rate. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    328449
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and its work. 1993.

    Bynum WF; Porter R

    American Journal of Public Health. 2008 Sep; 98(9):1594-7.

    In 1948, after its first World Health Assembly, the WHO took action to form a Secretariat in Geneva. It was given space for its initial years in the Palais des Nations, which had been the last home of the League of Nations. As stated in Chapter I of its Constitution, WHO was "to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work." This was a much broader scope than any other international agency in the orbit of the UN. (excerpt)
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  14. 14
    327409
    Peer Reviewed

    Linking Global Youth Tobacco Survey 2003 and 2006 data to tobacco control policy in India.

    Sinha DN; Gupta PC; Reddy KS; Prasad VM; Rahman K

    Journal of School Health. 2008 Jul; 78(7):368-373.

    India made 2 important policy statements regarding tobacco control in the past decade. First, the India Tobacco Control Act (ITCA) was signed into law in 2003 with the goal to reduce tobacco consumption and protect citizens from exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). Second, in 2005, India ratified the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). During this same period, India conducted the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) in 2003 and 2006 in an effort to track tobacco use among adolescents. The GYTS is a school-based survey of students aged 13-15 years. Representative national estimates for India in 2003 and 2006 were used in this study. In 2006, 3.8% of students currently smoked cigarettes and 11.9% currently used other tobacco products. These rates were not significantly different than those observed in 2003. Over the same period, exposure to SHS at home and in public places significantly decreased, whereas exposure to pro-tobacco ads on billboards and the ability to purchase cigarettes in a store did not change significantly. The ITCA and the WHO FCTC have had mixed impacts on the tobacco control effort for adolescents in India. The positive impacts have been the reduction in exposure to SHS, both at home and in public places. The negative impacts are seen with the lack of change in pro-tobacco advertising and ability to purchase cigarettes in stores. The Government of India needs to consider new and stronger provisions of the ITCA and include strong enforcement measures. (author's)
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  15. 15
    327008

    The state of Africa's children 2008. Child survival.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2008 May. 54 p.

    Every year, the United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF) publishes The State of the World's Children, the most comprehensive and authoritative report on the world's youngest citizens. The State of the World's Children 2008, published in January 2008, examines the global realities of maternal and child survival and the prospects for meeting the health-related Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) - the targets set by the world community in 2000 for eradicating poverty, reducing child and maternal mortality, combating disease, ensuring environmental sustainability and providing access to affordable medicines in developing countries. This year, UNICEF is also publishing the inaugural edition of The State of Africa's Children. This volume and other forthcoming regional editions complement The State of the World's Children 2008, sharpening from a worldwide to a regional perspective the global report's focus on trends in child survival and health, and outlining possible solutions - by means of programmes, policies and partnerships - to accelerate progress in meeting the Millennium Development Goals. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    326040

    Safe, voluntary, informed male circumcision and comprehensive HIV prevention programming. Guidance for decision-makers on human rights, ethical and legal considerations. Pre-publication.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; AIDS Law Project, South Africa

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2008 Mar. 28 p. (UNAIDS/08.19E / JC1552E)

    Throughout the world, HIV prevalence is generally lower in populations that practise male circumcision than in populations where most men are uncircumcised. This has been observed over the years of the HIV epidemic and has now been confirmed through three randomized controlled trials concluded in 2005-2006. The trials showed that male circumcision reduces by 60% the transmission of HIV from women to circumcised men. The results have led to the conclusion that male circumcision is an effective risk-reduction measure for men, and should be used in addition to other known strategies for the prevention of heterosexually acquired HIV infection in men. (excerpt)
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  17. 17
    325742
    Peer Reviewed

    Kevin De Cock: Guiding HIV / AIDS policy at WHO.

    Shetty P

    Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2008 Feb; 8(2):98-100.

    Kevin De Cock is director of WHO's HIV/AIDS department. Formerly director of the US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Kenya, he is an infectious disease specialist, with expertise in HIV/ AIDS, tuberculosis, liver disease, and tropical diseases such as yellow fever and viral haemorrhagic fevers. TLID: How has your time as WHO's HIV/AIDS director been? KDC: It has been extremely interesting. AIDS policy is always challenging and changing. WHO's HIV efforts up to 2005 were very much oriented around the 3 by 5 initiative. The G8 in 2005 made an announcement about working towards universal access, which became an AIDS rallying cry. So we've had to reorganise ourselves around that as a theme. Some internal reorganisation was necessary to focus not only on treatment, but also on broader issues. We now have five key strategic directions: increasing access to HIV testing and counselling, maximising prevention, accelerating treatment scale-up, strengthening health systems, and investing in strategic information. We have also been working on some important technical areas. One is the issuing of guidance on both provider-initiated testing and male circumcision. In April, 2007, we also issued a report, in response to a request from the World Health Assembly, on the health sector's progress towards universal access. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    325496

    Eliminating female genital mutilation: an interagency statement. OHCHR, UNAIDS, UNDP, UNECA, UNESCO, UNFPA, UNHCR, UNICEF, UNIFEM, WHO.

    United Nations. Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights [OHCHR]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; United Nations Development Programme [UNDP]; United Nations. Economic Commission for Africa; UNESCO

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2008. 41 p.

    The term 'female genital mutilation' (also called 'female genital cutting' and 'female genital mutilation/cutting') refers to all procedures involving partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or other injury to the female genital organs for non-medical reasons. Between 100 and 140 million girls and women in the world are estimated to have undergone such procedures, and 3 million girls are estimated to be at risk of undergoing the procedures every year. Female genital mutilation has been reported to occur in all parts of the world, but it is most prevalent in: the western, eastern, and north-eastern regions of Africa, some countries in Asia and the Middle East and among certain immigrant communities in North America and Europe. Female genital mutilation has no known health benefits. On the contrary, it is known to be harmful to girls and women in many ways. First and foremost, it is painful and traumatic. The removal of or damage to healthy, normal genital tissue interferes with the natural functioning of the body and causes several immediate and long-term health consequences. For example, babies born to women who have undergone female genital mutilation suffer a higher rate of neonatal death compared with babies born to women who have not undergone the procedure. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    324673
    Peer Reviewed

    Sulphadoxine / pyrimethamine versus amodiaquine for treating uncomplicated childhood malaria in Gabon: A randomized trial to guide national policy.

    Nsimba B; Guiyedi V; Mabika-Mamfoumbi M; Mourou-Mbina JR; Ngoungou E

    Malaria Journal. 2008 Feb 12; 7:31.

    In Gabon, following the adoption of amodiaquine/artesunate combination (AQ/AS) as first-line treatment of malaria and of sulphadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) for preventive intermittent treatment of pregnant women, a clinical trial of SP versus AQ was conducted in a sub-urban area. This is the first study carried out in Gabon following the WHO guidelines. A random comparison of the efficacy of AQ (10 mg/kg/day x 3d) and a single dose of SP (25 mg/kg of sulphadoxine/1.25 mg/kg of pyrimethamine) was performed in children under five years of age, with uncomplicated falciparum malaria, using the 28-day WHO therapeutic efficacy test. In addition, molecular genotyping was performed to distinguish recrudescence from reinfection and to determine the frequency of the dhps K540E mutation, as a molecular marker to predict SP-treatment failure. The day-28 PCR-adjusted treatment failures for SP and AQ were 11.6% (8/69; 95% IC: 5.5-22.1) and 28.2% (20/71; 95% CI: 17.7-38.7), respectively This indicated that SP was significantly superior to AQ (P= 0.019) in the treatment of uncomplicated childhood malaria and for preventing recurrent infections. Both treatments were safe and well-tolerated, with no serious adverse reactions recorded. The dhps K540E mutation was not found among the 76 parasite isolates tested. The level of AQ-resistance observed in the present study may compromise efficacy and duration of use of the AQ/AS combination, the new first-line malaria treatment. Gabonese policy-makers need to plan country-wide and close surveillance of AQ/AS efficacy to determine whether, and for how long, these new recommendations for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria remain valid. (author's)
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