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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    332932

    Challenging inequity through health systems. Final report: Knowledge Network on Health Systems. WHO Commission on the Social Determinants of Health.

    Gilson L; Doherty J; Loewenson R; Francis V

    [Johannesburg], South Africa, University of the Witwatersrand, Centre for Health Policy, Health Systems Knowledge Network, 2007 Jun. [146] p.

    The way that health systems are designed, financed and operated acts as a powerful determinant of health. The Health Systems Knowledge Network reviewed the evidence on different approaches to improving health equity outcomes through health systems. The focus was on innovative approaches that effectively incorporate action on the social determinants of health, and on strategies of policy development and implementation. Key themes were: Using the health sector to leverage inter-sectoral actions that address the social determinants of health; Enabling social empowerment in support of health equity; Identifying key elements of vision and health system architecture necessary to secure social protection and universal coverage; Building and maintaining national policy space for health policies that seek social justice; and Strengthening management and stewardship capacities within the health sector. The Health Systems Knowledge Network was chaired by Lucy Gilson of the Centre for Health Policy, and made up of 14 experienced policy-makers, academics and members of civil society from around the world. The Network engaged with other sections of the Commission and also commissioned a number of systematic reviews and case studies. This is the final report of the network.
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  2. 2
    345013

    Essential medicines for mothers and children: a key element of health systems. Access to medicines and public pharmaceutical policy.

    Joncheere K

    Entre Nous. 2009; (68):14-15.

    Medicines, when used appropriately, are one of the most cost effective interventions in health care. European countries spend an important part of their health budget on medicines, from 12% on average for the EU countries to more than 30% for the Newly Independent States (NIS) countries. Whereas in EU countries the larger part of the medicines expenditures are publicly funded through taxes and/or social health insurance, in the NIS and in the south eastern European countries it is often the patients who have to pay directly for the drugs themselves. This means that many patients simply do not get the drugs they need because they cannot afford them, and also may force families to incur enormous expenses as they sell their belongings in order to pay for their drugs and their health care.
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  3. 3
    278790
    Peer Reviewed

    The role and influence of stakeholders and donors on reproductive health services in Turkey: a critical review.

    Ozvaris SB; Akin L; Akin A

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2004; 12(24):116-127.

    Since 1965, Turkey has followed an anti-natalist population policy and made significant progress in improving sexual and reproductive health. This paper presents a critical review of the national reproductive health policies and programmes of Turkey and discusses the influence of national and international stakeholders and donors on policy and implementation. While government health services have played the primary role in meeting sexual and reproductive health needs, international donor agencies and national non-governmental and other civil society organisations, especially universities, have played an important complementary role. Major donor agencies have supported many beneficial programmes to improve reproductive health in Turkey, but their agendas have sometimes not been compatible with national objectives and goals, which has caused frustration. The main conclusion of this review is that countries with clear and strong reproductive health policies can better direct the implementation of international agreements as well as get the most benefit from the support of international donors. (author's)
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  4. 4
    273837

    The role of the health sector in supporting adolescent health and development. Materials prepared for the technical briefing at the World Health Assembly, 22 May 2003.

    Brandrup-Lukanow A; Akhsan S; Conyer RT; Shaheed A; Kianian-Firouzgar S

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2003. 15 p.

    I am very pleased to be here, and to be part of the discussion on Young Peoples Health at the World Health Assembly, for two reasons: because of the work we have been doing in adolescent health over the past years together with the Member States of the European Region of WHO, the work in cooperation with other UN agencies, especially UNICEF, UNFPA, and UNAIDS on adolescent health and development. Secondly, because Youth is a priority area of work of German Development Cooperation, and of the German Agency for Technical Cooperation, where I am working presently. Indeed, we have devoted this years GTZ´s open house day on development cooperation to youth I would also like to take this opportunity to remember the work of the late Dr. Herbert Friedman, former Chief of Adolescent Health in WHO, whose vision of the importance of working for and with young people has inspired many of the national plans and initiatives which we will hear about today. In many countries of the world, young people form the majority of populations, and yet their needs are being insufficiently met through existing health and social services. The health of young people was long denied the public, and public health attention it deserves. Adolescence is a driving force of personal, but also social development, as young people gradually discover, and question and challenge the adult world they are growing into. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    180915

    Bangladesh: contraceptive logistics system. Review of accomplishments and lessons learned.

    Kinzett S; Bates J

    Arlington, Virginia, John Snow [JSI], Family Planning Logistics Management [FPLM], 2000. x, 67 p. (USAID Contract No. CCP-C-00-95-00028-00)

    This report documents the status of technical assistance provided by the USAID-funded Family Planning Logistics Management project to the Bangladesh Family Planning Program in developing a countrywide contraceptive logistics system. A study conducted in November 1999 to evaluate the impact of technical assistance on logistics management and contraceptive security is detailed. The report concludes with findings from the study, lessons learned, and recommendations to continue improvements in the system. (author's)
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