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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    347863

    Consultation on strategic information and HIV prevention among most-at-risk adolescents. 2-4 September 2009, Geneva. Consultation report.

    UNICEF; UNAIDS. Inter-Agency Task Team on HIV and Young People

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2010. 65 p.

    The Consultation on Strategic Information and HIV Prevention among Most-at-Risk Adolescents (MARA) focused on experiences in countries where HIV infection is concentrated among men who have sex with men (MSM), injecting drug users (IDUs), and those who sell sex. The meeting facilitated the exchange of information across regions on country-level data collection regarding MARA; identified ways to use strategic information to improve HIV prevention among MARA; and suggested ways to build support for MARA programming among decision-makers.
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  2. 2
    328449
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and its work. 1993.

    Bynum WF; Porter R

    American Journal of Public Health. 2008 Sep; 98(9):1594-7.

    In 1948, after its first World Health Assembly, the WHO took action to form a Secretariat in Geneva. It was given space for its initial years in the Palais des Nations, which had been the last home of the League of Nations. As stated in Chapter I of its Constitution, WHO was "to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work." This was a much broader scope than any other international agency in the orbit of the UN. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    305870

    Final technical report to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID): Strengthening Nutrition Management in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Grant No. 294-G-00-04-00208-00.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 6 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-528; USAID Grant No. 294-G-00-04-00208-00)

    The general objective of the project is to strengthen the MoH Nutrition Department (ND) in order to achieve an effective, sustainable and functioning body in the area of nutrition. The Nutrition Department will be in charge of policy, planning, monitoring, evaluation and coordination, considering both short-term emergency interventions and long-term activities related to nutrition. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    303742

    UNAIDS: an overview.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1996. 9 p. (Facts about UNAIDS)

    Around 6 million people worldwide have died of AIDS since the start of the epidemic. Well over 20 million are living with HIV, the virus that causes AIDS. Already, there are communities and even whole cities where one out of every three adults is infected, and the repercussions of these dense clusters of illness and death will linger for decades. The epidemic and its impact are becoming a permanent challenge to human ingenuity and solidarity. Since the first of January 1996, UNAIDS -- the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS -- has carried the main responsibility within the UN system for helping countries strengthen their long-term capacity to cope with this challenge. Based in Geneva, Switzerland, the new programme is cosponsored by six organizations of the UN family -- United Nations Children's Fund (UNICEF), United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA), United Nations Educational, Scientific and Cultural Organization (UNESCO), World Health Organization (WHO), and the World Bank. Together with its cosponsors and other partners around the world, UNAIDS is hard at work on its mission -- leading and catalysing an expanded response to the epidemic to improve prevention and care, reduce people's vulnerability to HIV/AIDS, and alleviate the epidemic's devastating social and economic impact. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    282141

    An evaluation of UNESCO's response to HIV / AIDS.

    Forss K; Kruse SE

    Oslo, Norway, Centre for Health and Social Development, 2004 Apr. [125] p.

    UNESCO decided to commission an external evaluation of its response to the HIV/AIDS epidemic in 2002. The purpose was to analyse results, assess performance, and develop recommendations for future activities. It was to be a participatory exercise, which should contribute to capacity building in evaluation. The evaluation builds on data from Thailand and Vietnam in Southeast Asia; Mozambique, Angola and Namibia in Southern Africa; Ghana and Senegal in West Africa; Jamaica and Brazil in Latin America and the Caribbean; and Lebanon in the Middle East. Kenya was visited as part of a thematic study on gender issues. The organisational topics of strategy formulation, budgeting, monitoring and evaluation, decentralisation and coordination were analysed based on the field visits and on interviews at UNESCO Headquarters in Paris. The evaluation team conducted some 300 interviews with UNESCO staff, government representatives in the above mentioned countries, UN partner agencies, civil society and stakeholder groups concerned with UNESCO’s HIV/AIDS activities. The evaluation perused documents in UNESCO and outside, and was also able to draw conclusions from observing activities being implemented. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    280675
    Peer Reviewed

    Barriers to sustainable tuberculosis control in the Russian Federation health system.

    Atun RA; Samyshkin YA; Drobniewski F; Skuratova NM; Gusarova G

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2005; 83:217-223.

    The Russian Federation has the eleventh highest tuberculosis burden in the world in terms of the total estimated number of new cases that occur each year. In 2003, 26% of the population was covered by the internationally recommended control strategy known as directly observed treatment (DOT) compared to an overall average of 61% among the 22 countries with the highest burden of tuberculosis. The Director-General of WHO has identified two necessary starting points for the scaling-up of interventions to control emerging infectious diseases. These are a comprehensive engagement with the health system and a strengthening of the health system. The success of programmes aimed at controlling infectious diseases is often determined by constraints posed by the health system. We analyse and evaluate the impact of the arrangements for delivering tuberculosis services in the Russian Federation, drawing on detailed analyses of barriers and incentives created by the organizational structures, and financing and provider-payment systems. We demonstrate that the systems offer few incentives to improve the efficiency of services or the effectiveness of tuberculosis control. Instead, the system encourages prolonged supervision through specialized outpatient departments in hospitals (known as dispensaries), multiple admissions to hospital and lengthy hospitalization. The implementation, and expansion and sustainability of WHO-approved methods of tuberculosis control in Russian Federation are unlikely to be realized under the prevailing system of service delivery. This is because implementation does not take into account the wider context of the health system. In order for the control programme to be sustainable, the health system will need to be changed to enable services to be reconfigured so that incentives are created to reward improvements in efficiency and outcomes. (author's)
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  7. 7
    189452

    Infant and young child feeding. A tool for assessing national practices, policies and programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. xvi, 140 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00007-00)

    This Tool is designed to assist users in assessing the status of infant and young child feeding practices, policies, and programmes in their country. The purpose of such an assessment is to identify strengths and possible weaknesses, with a view to improving the protection, promotion, and support of optimal infant and young child feeding. The Tool is designed to be a flexible instrument. It can be used in its entirety, which is preferred, or in part, and can be employed by a range of users for various purposes. The approach taken may depend on: - the stage of policy and programme development in the country concerned; - the commitment of key decision-makers to undertake the assessment and to use the results; and - the human and financial resources available. The Tool can be used as a companion piece to the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding as an assessment tool to help determine where improvements might be needed to meet the Global Strategy targets. Consideration should be given to using the Tool periodically, every several years, to track trends on the various indicators, report on progress, identify areas still needing improvement, and assist in the planning process. (excerpt)
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