Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    329202

    The HIV epidemic: squeezing out the African voice [letter]

    Simms C

    Journal of Internal Medicine. 2008 Nov; 264(5):504-8.

    Had there been a strong African voice contributing to World Bank decisions, it is unlikely that deliberate sidelining of HIV by health sector reforms would have taken place. However, given Bank's architecture and processes, an adequate response to the crisis was a nonstarter; unlike mediocre responses to Africa's other health needs, it has been less easy for the IDC to duck its responsibility and place the blame on its so-called African partners. Nevertheless, the lack of an African voice distorts historical analyses of the crisis often reflecting a western perspective, emphasizing the lack of political will and African governments' failure to act, whilst underplaying the IDC's shortcomings. The notion itself that the epidemic is 25 years old rather than the more accurate 75 years old reflects this distortion. Most of the responsibility rests with the Bank's Board and top management. OED reports that it 'could find no evidence that other top management raised the issue with borrowers or pushed the issue to a higher level internally'. Where there was positive response by the bank at the country level, 'the initiative for AIDS strategies and lending came primarily from individual health staff in the regional and technical operational groupings of the Bank, but not in any coherent way from the Bank's HNP leadership or top-level management. The current initiative by the British House of Commons Committee for International Development to reform the World Bank effectively reverses the notion that the reform was all but impossible because it was a zero sum game. Today, however, its donor members may find the demonstrable unfairness and ineffectiveness less tolerable. It is unlikely that the next president of the Bank will be chosen solely by the United States. Reformers will now need to revise its constitutional rules, their balancing of stakeholder rights, their decision-making rules and practices and their staffing and expertise. The course of the HIV epidemic means that the status quo is no longer acceptable. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    327409
    Peer Reviewed

    Linking Global Youth Tobacco Survey 2003 and 2006 data to tobacco control policy in India.

    Sinha DN; Gupta PC; Reddy KS; Prasad VM; Rahman K

    Journal of School Health. 2008 Jul; 78(7):368-373.

    India made 2 important policy statements regarding tobacco control in the past decade. First, the India Tobacco Control Act (ITCA) was signed into law in 2003 with the goal to reduce tobacco consumption and protect citizens from exposure to secondhand smoke (SHS). Second, in 2005, India ratified the World Health Organization Framework Convention on Tobacco Control (WHO FCTC). During this same period, India conducted the Global Youth Tobacco Survey (GYTS) in 2003 and 2006 in an effort to track tobacco use among adolescents. The GYTS is a school-based survey of students aged 13-15 years. Representative national estimates for India in 2003 and 2006 were used in this study. In 2006, 3.8% of students currently smoked cigarettes and 11.9% currently used other tobacco products. These rates were not significantly different than those observed in 2003. Over the same period, exposure to SHS at home and in public places significantly decreased, whereas exposure to pro-tobacco ads on billboards and the ability to purchase cigarettes in a store did not change significantly. The ITCA and the WHO FCTC have had mixed impacts on the tobacco control effort for adolescents in India. The positive impacts have been the reduction in exposure to SHS, both at home and in public places. The negative impacts are seen with the lack of change in pro-tobacco advertising and ability to purchase cigarettes in stores. The Government of India needs to consider new and stronger provisions of the ITCA and include strong enforcement measures. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    318962

    The potential of private sector midwives in reaching Millennium Development Goals.

    White P; Levin L

    Bethesda, Maryland, Abt Associates. Private Sector Partnerships-One [PSP-One], 2006 Dec. 48 p. (Technical Report No. 6; USAID Contract No. GPO-I-00-04-00007-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No. PN-ADI-754)

    Government health sectors in many countries face an uphill battle to reach the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) set for 2015. In the last six years, Ministries of Health (MOHs) in many less developed countries (LDCs) have been unable to invest sufficiently in their health systems. To achieve the MDGs despite inadequate resources, new approaches for delivering critical clinical services must be considered. This paper explores the potential for private-sector midwives to provide services beyond their traditional scope of care during pregnancies and births to address shortcomings in LDCs' ability to reach MDGs. This paper examines factors that support or constrain private practice midwives' (PPMWs') ability to offer expanded services in order to inform the policy and donor communities about PPMWs' potential. Data was collected through literature reviews, stakeholder interviews, and field-based, semi-structured interviews in Ghana, Indonesia, Peru, Uganda, and Zambia. Ghana, Indonesia, and Uganda were chosen because they are countries where PPMWs provide expanded services. Peru and Zambia were selected as examples where midwives have struggled to develop private practices or they provide expanded services despite issues about midwives' roles and legal sanctions for private practices. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    278927

    Implementing GIPA: how USAID missions and their implementing partners in five Asian countries are fostering greater involvement of people living with HIV / AIDS.

    Magaz P; Hardee K

    Washington, D.C., Futures Group International, POLICY Project, 2004 Jan. [32] p. (USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-00-00006-00)

    On behalf of the Asia/Near East Bureau (ANE) of the U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID), the POLICY Project undertook an assessment of how the Greater Involvement of People Living with HIV/AIDS (GIPA) Principle is being implemented in the ANE region. Five USAID Missions and 12 implementing agencies (IAs) in the region participated in the assessment, which was undertaken in May and June 2003 in Cambodia, India, Nepal, Philippines, and Viet Nam. The purpose of the assessment was to ascertain how Missions, IAs, and NGOs are incorporating GIPA principles into their organizations and into the programmatic work they support and implement. A self-administered questionnaire was completed by 23 respondents from Missions, IAs, and NGOs. The assessment found a high level of awareness of GIPA and a commitment by most organizations to foster and promote GIPA principles, within their organizations and in the work they carry out. Ninety-one percent of respondents from the three types of organizations believe that their organizations’ planning, programs, and policymaking activities are or would be enhanced by GIPA. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    183612

    The sexual health of men in India and Bangladesh: What are men's concerns?

    Hawkes S; Collumbien M

    In: Programming for male involvement in reproductive health. Report of the meeting of WHO Regional Advisers in Reproductive Health, WHO / PAHO, Washington DC, USA, 5-7 September 2001. Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2002. 88-103. (WHO/FCH/RHR/02.3)

    Health sector priorities are ideally set according to a number of variables, including: burden of disease; whether effective and proven ‘solutions’ are available; and the calculated cost-effectiveness of those solutions. In the case of sexual health services, we argue in this paper that this conceptual framework is useful for programme planning, but needs to take into account one important additional element: the client’s perspective. We further argue that the sexual health of men in south Asia can not be adequately addressed unless men’s beliefs about their bodies, men’s health priorities, and men’s sexual health concerns are evaluated, interpreted and acted upon. Services which do not correspond to men’s own perceived sexual health needs are unlikely to attract men as clients, and thus remove many of the opportunities for male involvement in other aspects of reproductive and sexual health prevention and care. Men’s own sexual health priorities may not correspond exactly with the priorities of public health programmes; we therefore discuss how the two sets of concerns may be reconciled and men brought more equitably into programmes. Finally, we outline areas which may be of particular concern to programme managers if this approach is adopted. (author’s)
    Add to my documents.