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Your search found 7 Results

  1. 1
    374729

    Optimal feeding of low-birthweight infants in low- and middle-income countries: highlights from the World Health Organization 2011 guidelines.

    Maternal and Child Survival Program [MCSP]

    [Washington, D.C.], MCSP, 2017 Jun. 6 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-A-14-00028)

    This brief presents the updated WHO Guidelines on Optimal Feeding of Low Birth-Weight Infants in Low- and Middle-Income Countries, and highlights changes and best practices for optimal feeding of LBW infants. It is intended to assist policymakers, program managers, educators, and health care providers involved in caring for LBW infants to put the recommendations into action. It is hoped that such actions will contribute to improving the quality of care for LBW infants, thereby reducing LBW mortality and improving health outcomes for this group.
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  2. 2
    337377

    Global nutrition targets 2025: Stunting policy brief.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [9] p. (WHO/NMH/NHD/14.3)

    In 2012, the World Health Assembly Resolution 65.6 endorsed a Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition, which specified six global nutrition targets for 2025. This policy brief covers the first target: a 40% reduction in the number of children under-5 who are stunted. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, investment in, and action for a set of cost-effective interventions and policies that can help Member States and their partners in reducing stunting rates among children aged under 5 years. (Excerpts)
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  3. 3
    337375

    Global nutrition targets 2025: Childhood overweight policy brief.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [8] p. (WHO/NMH/NHD/14.6)

    In 2012, the World Health Assembly Resolution 65.6 endorsed a Comprehensive implementation plan for maternal, infant and young child nutrition, which specified six global nutrition targets for 2025. This policy brief covers the fourth target: No increase in childhood overweight. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, investment in, and action for a set of cost-effective interventions and policies that can help Member States and their partners prevent continued increases in overweight in children and ensure that the target is met. (Excerpts)
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  4. 4
    337374

    Global nutrition targets 2025: Low birth weight policy brief.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [6] p. (WHO/NMH/NHD/14.5)

    In 2012, the World Health Assembly Resolution 65.6 endorsed a Comprehensive implementation plan on maternal, infant and young child nutrition, which specified six global nutrition targets for 2025. This policy brief covers the third target: a 30% reduction in low birth weight. The purpose of this policy brief is to increase attention to, investment in, and action for a set of cost-effective interventions and policies that can help Member States and their partners in reducing rates of low birth weight. (Excerpts)
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  5. 5
    311532

    Mainstreaming by organizations to improve infant and young child feeding.

    Academy for Educational Development [AED]. Breastfeeding, LAM, Related Complementary Feeding, and Maternal Nutrition Program [LINKAGES]

    Washington, D.C., AED, LINKAGES, 2006 Sep. 6 p. (Experience LINKAGES; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00007-00; USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse Doc ID / Order No. PN-ADH-497)

    One of LINKAGES' goals is to assist global and local organizations in integrating results-oriented behavior change interventions, technical information, supportive policies, and other project innovations into their own programs to improve breastfeeding and related complementary feeding and maternal dietary practices. LINKAGES developed a mainstreaming framework to better define, observe, track, and guide the process. This issue of Experience LINKAGES describes what mainstreaming means and how mainstreaming lends itself to the replication, scale up, and sustainability of project innovations. LINKAGES defines mainstreaming as making routine an innovation that successfully addresses an opportunity or problem. Mainstreaming is done by--not for--organizations. Replication, scale up, and sustainability are mainstreaming goals within an organization's "geography" of headquarters, regional centers, national offices, and field projects. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    189858
    Peer Reviewed

    [A review of breastfeeding in Brazil and how the country has reached ten months' breastfeeding duration] Reflexôes sobre a amamentação no Brasil: de como passamos a 10 meses de duração.

    Rea MF

    Cadernos de Saude Publica. 2003; 19 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    In 1975, one out of two Brazilian women only breastfed until the second or third month; in a survey from 1999, one out of two breastfed for 10 months. This increase over the course of 25 years can be viewed as a success, but it also shows that many activities could be better organized, coordinated, and corrected when errors occur. Various relevant decisions have been made by international health agencies during this period, in addition to studies on breastfeeding that have reoriented practice. We propose to review the history of the Brazilian national program to promote breastfeeding, focusing on an analysis of the influence of international policies and analyzing them in four periods: 1975-1981 (when little was done), 1981-1986 (media campaigns), 1986-1996 (breastfeeding-friendly policies), and 1996-2002 (planning and human resources training activities backed by policies to protect breastfeeding). The challenge for the future is to continue to promote exclusive breastfeeding until the sixth month, taking specific population groups into account. (author's)
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  7. 7
    189452

    Infant and young child feeding. A tool for assessing national practices, policies and programmes.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. xvi, 140 p. (USAID Cooperative Agreement No. HRN-A-00-97-00007-00)

    This Tool is designed to assist users in assessing the status of infant and young child feeding practices, policies, and programmes in their country. The purpose of such an assessment is to identify strengths and possible weaknesses, with a view to improving the protection, promotion, and support of optimal infant and young child feeding. The Tool is designed to be a flexible instrument. It can be used in its entirety, which is preferred, or in part, and can be employed by a range of users for various purposes. The approach taken may depend on: - the stage of policy and programme development in the country concerned; - the commitment of key decision-makers to undertake the assessment and to use the results; and - the human and financial resources available. The Tool can be used as a companion piece to the Global Strategy for Infant and Young Child Feeding as an assessment tool to help determine where improvements might be needed to meet the Global Strategy targets. Consideration should be given to using the Tool periodically, every several years, to track trends on the various indicators, report on progress, identify areas still needing improvement, and assist in the planning process. (excerpt)
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