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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    333061

    Action on the social determinants of health: learning from previous experiences.

    Irwin A; Scali E

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2010. [52] p. (Discussion Paper Series on Social Determinants of Health No. 1)

    Today an unprecedented opportunity exists to improve health in some of the world's poorest and most vulnerable communities by tackling the root causes of disease and health inequalities. The most powerful of these causes are the social conditions in which people live and work, referred to as the social determinants of health (SDH). The Millennium Development Goals (MDGs) shape the current global development agenda. The MDGs recognize the interdependence of health and social conditions and present an opportunity to promote health policies that tackle the social roots of unfair and avoidable human suffering. The Commission on Social Determinants of Health (CSDH) is poised for leadership in this process. To reach its objectives, however, the CSDH must learn from the history of previous attempts to spur action on SDH. This paper pursues three questions: (1) Why didn't previous efforts to promote health policies on social determinants succeed? (2) Why do we think the CSDH can do better? (3) What can the Commission learn from previous experiences -- negative and positive -- that can increase its chances for success? (Excerpt)
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  2. 2
    328449
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and its work. 1993.

    Bynum WF; Porter R

    American Journal of Public Health. 2008 Sep; 98(9):1594-7.

    In 1948, after its first World Health Assembly, the WHO took action to form a Secretariat in Geneva. It was given space for its initial years in the Palais des Nations, which had been the last home of the League of Nations. As stated in Chapter I of its Constitution, WHO was "to act as the directing and coordinating authority on international health work." This was a much broader scope than any other international agency in the orbit of the UN. (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    189858
    Peer Reviewed

    [A review of breastfeeding in Brazil and how the country has reached ten months' breastfeeding duration] Reflexôes sobre a amamentação no Brasil: de como passamos a 10 meses de duração.

    Rea MF

    Cadernos de Saude Publica. 2003; 19 Suppl 1:S37-S45.

    In 1975, one out of two Brazilian women only breastfed until the second or third month; in a survey from 1999, one out of two breastfed for 10 months. This increase over the course of 25 years can be viewed as a success, but it also shows that many activities could be better organized, coordinated, and corrected when errors occur. Various relevant decisions have been made by international health agencies during this period, in addition to studies on breastfeeding that have reoriented practice. We propose to review the history of the Brazilian national program to promote breastfeeding, focusing on an analysis of the influence of international policies and analyzing them in four periods: 1975-1981 (when little was done), 1981-1986 (media campaigns), 1986-1996 (breastfeeding-friendly policies), and 1996-2002 (planning and human resources training activities backed by policies to protect breastfeeding). The challenge for the future is to continue to promote exclusive breastfeeding until the sixth month, taking specific population groups into account. (author's)
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