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  1. 1
    296074

    A pivotal decade: 1995-2005.

    UNICEF

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2005 Apr. [35] p.

    The past decade has seen UNICEF take the very best practices from its long and productive history and apply them in the service of today's children who live in a world previously unimagined. A complex world marked by intractable poverty, pervasive political instability, serial conflicts, HIV and AIDS. A world where there are few, if any, single causes, easy solutions or quick fixes. At $1.7 billion in 2004, UNICEF's income almost doubled in 10 years. The money, all voluntary contributions, was invested in programmes that prioritized early childhood, immunization, girls' education, improved protection and HIV and AIDS. Global progress on many fronts has been phenomenal: Mortality rates for children under five have dropped by around 15 per cent since 1990; Deaths from diarrhoea, one of the major killers of children under five, have been cut in half since 1990; Polio, once a deadly killer, is nearly eradicated; Measles deaths dropped by nearly 40 per cent; More children are in school than ever before; National laws and policies to better protect children have been enacted in dozens of countries. And, perhaps most profoundly of all, nearly every country in the world has ratified the Convention on the Rights of the Child. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    188818
    Peer Reviewed

    Reframing HIV and AIDS.

    Stabinski L; Pelley K; Jacob ST; Long JM; Leaning J

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2003 Nov 8; 327:1101-1103.

    Over the past 20 years, the public health community has learnt a tremendous amount about the HIV/AIDS epidemic. Yet, despite widespread discussion about the epidemic and some measurable progress, the overall response has been insufficient: globally 42 million people are already infected with HIV, prevalence continues to rise, and less than 5% of those affected have access to lifesaving medicines. In the face of this growing crisis, the World Health Organization has made scaling up treatment a key priority of the new administration. We argue that not only is the HIV/AIDS epidemic an emergency, but its devastating effects on societies may qualify it as one of the most serious disasters to have affected humankind. As such, this crisis warrants a full disaster management response. (excerpt)
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