Your search found 395 Results

  1. 1
    375173

    Task sharing to improve access to family planning / contraception

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 12 p. (Summary Brief WHO/RHR/17.20)

    Contraception is an inexpensive and cost-effective intervention, but health workforce shortages and restrictive policies on the roles of mid- and lower-level cadres limit access to effective contraceptive methods in many settings. Expanding the provision of contraceptive methods to other health worker cadres can significantly improve access to contraception for all individuals and couples. Many countries have already enabled mid- and lower-level cadres of health workers to deliver a range of contraceptive methods, utilizing these cadres either alone or as part of teams within communities and/or health care facilities. The WHO recognizes task sharing as a promising strategy for addressing the critical lack of health care workers to provide reproductive, maternal and newborn care in low-income countries. Task sharing is envisioned to create a more rational distribution of tasks and responsibilities among cadres of health workers to improve access and cost-effectiveness.
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  2. 2
    393224

    Professional care delivery or traditional birth attendants? The impact of the type of care utilized by mothers on under-five mortality of their children.

    Muzyamba C; Groot W; Pavlova M; Rud I; Tomini SM

    Tropical Medicine and Health. 2018; 46(1)

    Background: Because of the high under-five mortality rate, the government in Zambia has adopted the World Health Organization (WHO) policy on child delivery which insists on professional maternal care. However, there are scholars who criticize this policy by arguing that although built on good intentions, the policy to ban traditional birth attendants (TBAs) is out of touch with local reality in Zambia. There is lack of evidence to legitimize either of the two positions, nor how the outcome differs between women with HIV and those without HIV. Thus, the aim of this paper is to investigate the effect of using professional maternal care or TBA care by mothers (during antenatal, delivery, and postnatal) on under-five mortality of their children. We also compare these outcomes between HIV-positive and HIV-negative women. Methods: By relying on data from the 2013-2014 Zambia Demographic Health Survey (ZDHS), we carried out propensity score matching (PSM) to investigate the effect of utilization of professional care or TBA during antenatal, childbirth, and postnatal on under-five mortality. This method allows us to estimate the average treatment effect on the treated (ATT). Results: Our results show that the use of professional care as opposed to TBAs in all three stages of maternal care increases the probability of children surviving beyond 5 years old. Specifically for women with HIV, professional care usage during antenatal, at birth, and during postnatal periods increases probability of survival by 0.07 percentage points (p.p), 0.71 p.p, and 0.87 p.p respectively. Similarly, for HIV-negative women, professional care usage during antenatal, at birth, and during postnatal periods increases probability of survival by 0.71 p.p, 0.52 p.p, and 0.37 p.p respectively. However, although there is a positive impact when mothers choose professional care over TBAs, the differences at all three points of maternal care are small. Conclusion: Given our findings, showing small differences in under-five child's mortality between utilizers of professional care and utilizers of TBAs, it may be questioned whether the government's intention of completely excluding TBAs (who despite being outlawed are still being used) without replacement by good quality professional care is the right decision. © 2018 The Author(s).
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  3. 3
    393087
    Peer Reviewed

    Integrating systematic screening for gender-based violence into sexual and reproductive health services: results of a baseline study by the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region.

    Guedes A; Bott S; Cuca Y

    International Journal of Gynaecology and Obstetrics. 2002 Sep; 78 Suppl 1:S57-S63.

    Three Latin American affiliates of the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region, Inc. (IPPF/WHR) have begun to integrate gender-based violence screening and services into sexual and reproductive health programs. This paper presents results of a baseline study conducted in the affiliates. Although most staff support integration and many had already begun to address violence in their work, additional sensitization and training, as well as institution-wide changes are needed to provide services effectively and to address needs of women experiencing violence. (c) 2002 International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics.
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  4. 4
    375892

    Prevention and control of malaria in pregnancy: reference manual. 3rd edition, 2018 update.

    JHPIEGO

    Baltimore, Maryland, Jhpiego, 2018. 92 p. (USAID Award No. HRN-A-00-98-00043-00; USAID Leader with Associates Cooperative Agreement No.GHS-A-00-04-00002-00)

    The Malaria in Pregnancy reference manual and clinical learning materials are intended for skilled providers who provide antenatal care, including midwives, nurses, clinical officers, and medical assistants. The clinical learning materials can be used to conduct a 2-day workshop designed to provide learners with the knowledge and skills needed to prevent, recognize, and treat malaria in pregnancy as they provide focused antenatal care services.
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  5. 5
    375858

    Cervical cancer screening and management of cervical pre-cancers. Training of health staff in colposcopy, LEEP and CKC. Trainees' handbook.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    New Delhi, India, WHO, Regional Office for South-East Asia, 2017. 199 p.

    The Trainees’ handbook is designed to train gynaecologists and non-specialist clinicians in performing colposcopy and treatment of cervical precancerous conditions so they can provide the necessary diagnostic and therapeutic services in a cervical cancer screening programme. The Trainees’ handbook contains guidelines and information intended to be used both by trainees and facilitators while participating in the structured training programme on cervical cancer screening and treatment. The Trainees’ handbook contains different modules intended to assist trainees to develop their knowledge and learn the correct steps to perform colposcopy and treatment procedures. The modules contain checklists that serve as ready reckoners to develop skills in various procedures during clinical sessions. These checklists are also intended to be used by trainees during their post-training practice. The structure and methodology of the training have been designed to impart knowledge in the most effective manner and have taken into consideration the overall training objectives, profiles of trainees and the expected learning outcomes. (Excerpt)
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  6. 6
    375856

    Cervical cancer screening and management of cervical pre-cancers. Training of health staff in VIA, HPV detection test and cryotherapy -- Trainees' handbook.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for South-East Asia

    New Delhi, India, WHO, Regional Office for South-East Asia, 2017. 171 p.

    The Trainees’ handbook is designed for paramedical workers, midwives, nurses and clinicians involved in cervical cancer screening to help them acquire the necessary skills to perform VIA, collect samples for HPV test and treat cervical pre-cancers by ablative methods. The publication of the World Health Organization guidance document Comprehensive cervical cancer control: A guide to essential practice, 2nd edition, 2014 has necessitated modifications in the existing training resources for cervical cancer screening and treatment. The new screening recommendations and management algorithms have been incorporated in the present Trainees’ handbook. The Trainees’ handbook contains guidelines and information intended to be used both by trainees and facilitators while participating in the structured training on cervical cancer screening and treatment. The handbook contains different modules to assist trainees to learn various screening and treatment procedures step- by-step and to comprehend their underlying principles. The modules contain checklists that serve as ready reckoners to develop skills in various procedures during clinical sessions. These checklists are also intended to be used by trainees during their post-training practice. (Excerpt)
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  7. 7
    323635

    Responding to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. WHO clinical guidelines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 86 p.

    Sexual abuse of children and adolescents is a gross violation of their rights and a global public health problem. It adversely affects the health of children and adolescents. Health care providers are in a unique position to provide an empathetic response to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused. Such a response can go a long way in helping survivors recover from the trauma of sexual abuse. WHO has published new clinical guidelines Responding to children and adolescents who have been sexually abused aimed at helping front-line health workers, primarily from low resource settings, in providing evidence-based, quality, trauma-informed care to survivors. The guidelines emphasize the importance of promoting safety, offering choices and respecting the wishes and autonomy of children and adolescents. They cover recommendations for post-rape care and mental health; and approaches to minimizing distress in the process of taking medical history, conducting examination and documenting findings.
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  8. 8
    389408
    Peer Reviewed

    An assessment of staffing needs at a HIV clinic in a Western Kenya using the WHO workload indicators of staffing need WISN, 2011.

    Burmen B; Owuor N; Mitei P

    Human Resources For Health. 2017 Jan 26; 15(1):9.

    BACKGROUND: An optimal number of health workers, who are appropriately allocated across different occupations and geographical regions, are required to ensure population coverage of health interventions. Health worker shortages in HIV care provision are highest in areas that are worst hit by the HIV epidemic. Kenya is listed among countries that experience health worker shortages (<2.5 health workers per 1000 population) and have a high HIV burden (HIV prevalence 5.6 with 15.2% in Nyanza province). We set out to determine the optimum number of clinicians required to provide quality consultancy HIV care services at the Jaramogi Oginga Odinga Teaching and Referral Hospital, JOOTRH, HIV Clinic, the premier HIV clinic in Nyanza province with a cumulative client enrolment of PLHIV of over 20,000 persons. CASE PRESENTATION: The World Health's Organization's Workload Indicators of Staffing Needs (WISN) was used to compute the staffing needs and sufficiency of staffing needs at the JOOTRH HIV clinic in Kisumu, Kenya, between January and December 2011. All people living with HIV (PLHIV) who received HIV care services at the HIV clinic at JOOTRH and all the clinicians attending to them were included in this analysis. The actual staffing was divided by the optimal staff requirement to give ratios of staffing excesses or shortages. A ratio of 1.0 indicated optimal staffing, less than 1.0 indicated suboptimal staffing, and more than 1 indicated supra optimal staffing. The HIV clinic is served by 56 staff of various cadres. Clinicians (doctors and clinical officers) comprise approximately one fifth of this population (n = 12). All clinicians (excluding the clinic manager, who is engaged in administrative duties and supervisory roles that consumes approximately one third of his time) provide full-time consultancy services. To operate at maximum efficiency, the clinic therefore requires 19 clinicians. The clinic therefore operates with only 60% of its staffing requirements. CONCLUSIONS: Our assessment revealed a severe shortage of clinicians providing consultation services at the HIV clinic. Human resources managers should oversee the rational planning, training, retention, and management of human resources for health using the WISN which is an objective and reliable means of estimating staffing needs.
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  9. 9
    320196

    Responding to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women. WHO clinical and policy guidelines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2013. 68 p.

    A health-care provider is likely to be the first professional contact for survivors of intimate partner violence or sexual assault. Evidence suggests that women who have been subjected to violence seek health care more often than non-abused women, even if they do not disclose the associated violence. They also identify health-care providers as the professionals they would most trust with disclosure of abuse. These guidelines are an unprecedented effort to equip healthcare providers with evidence-based guidance as to how to respond to intimate partner violence and sexual violence against women. They also provide advice for policy makers, encouraging better coordination and funding of services, and greater attention to responding to sexual violence and partner violence within training programmes for health care providers. The guidelines are based on systematic reviews of the evidence, and cover: 1) identification and clinical care for intimate partner violence; 2) clinical care for sexual assault; 3) training relating to intimate partner violence and sexual assault against women; 4) policy and programmatic approaches to delivering services; and 5) mandatory reporting of intimate partner violence. The guidelines aim to raise awareness of violence against women among health-care providers and policy-makers, so that they better understand the need for an appropriate health-sector response. They provide standards that can form the basis for national guidelines, and for integrating these issues into health-care provider education.
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  10. 10
    377043

    WPA International Competency-Based Curriculum for Mental Health Providers on Intimate Partner Violence and Sexual Violence Against Women.

    Stewart DE; Chandra PS

    World Psychiatry. 2017 Jun; 16(2):223-224.

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  11. 11
    374222

    Quality of care in contraceptive information and services, based on human rights standards: a checklist for health care providers.

    Kiarie J; Khosla R; Ali M; Cottingham J

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 32 p.

    Unmet need for contraception remains high in many settings, and is highest among the most vulnerable in society: adolescents, the poor, those living in rural areas and urban slums, people living with HIV, and internally displaced people. The latest estimates are that 225 million women have an unmet need for modern contraception, and the need is greatest where the risks of maternal mortality are highest. There is increasing recognition that promotion and protection of human rights in contraceptive services and programs is critical to addressing this challenge. However, despite these efforts, human rights are often not explicitly integrated into the design, implementation and monitoring of services. A key challenge is how to best support health care providers and facility managers at the point of service delivery, often in low-resource real-world settings, to ensure their use of human rights aspects in provision of contraceptive services. The point of service delivery is the most direct point of contact where potential violations/omissions of rights come into play and requires special attention. This checklist covers five areas of competence needed by health care providers to provide quality of care in contraceptive information and services including: respecting users’ privacy and guaranteeing confidentiality, choice, accessible and acceptable services, involvement of users in improving services and fostering continuity of care and follow-up. International and regional human rights treaties, national constitutions and laws provide guarantees specifically relating to access to contraceptive information, commodities and services. In addition, over the past few decades, international, regional and national legislative and human rights bodies have increasingly applied human rights to contraceptive information and services. They recommend, among other actions, that states should ensure timely and affordable access to good quality sexual and reproductive health information and services, including contraception, which should be delivered in a way that ensures fully informed decision making, respects dignity, autonomy, privacy and confidentiality, and is sensitive to individuals’ needs and perspectives. This document presents a user friendly checklist specifically addressed to health care providers, at the primary health care level, who are involved in the direct provision of contraceptive information and services. It is complimentary to WHO guidelines on Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations, and the Implementation Guide published jointly with UNFPA in 2015. This checklist also builds on WHO vision document on Standards for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal and Newborn Care and its ongoing work under the Quality, Equity and Dignity initiative. The checklist should be read along with other guidance from WHO and also from partners.
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  12. 12
    344566

    Quality of care in contraceptive information and services, based on human rights standards: a checklist for health care providers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 32 p.

    International and regional human rights treaties, national constitutions and laws provide guarantees specifically relating to access to contraceptive information, commodities and services. In addition, over the past few decades, international, regional and national legislative and human rights bodies have increasingly applied human rights to contraceptive information and services. This document presents a user friendly checklist specifically addressed to health care providers, at the primary health care level, who are involved in the direct provision of contraceptive information and services. It is complimentary to WHO guidelines on Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations, and the Implementation Guide published jointly with UNFPA in 2015. This checklist also builds on WHO vision document on Standards for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal and Newborn Care and its ongoing work under the Quality, Equity and Dignity initiative. The checklist should be read along with other guidance from WHO and also from partners.
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  13. 13
    378908
    Peer Reviewed

    Management of childhood diarrhea by healthcare professionals in low income countries: An integrative review.

    Diallo AF; Cong X; Henderson WA; McGrath J

    International Journal of Nursing Studies. 2017 Jan; 66:82-92.

    Background The significant drop in child mortality due to diarrhea has been primarily attributed to the use of oral rehydration solutions, continuous feeding and zinc supplementation. Nevertheless uptake of these interventions have been slow in developing countries and many children suffering from diarrhea are not receiving adequate care according to the World Health Organization recommended guidelines for the clinical management of childhood diarrhea. Objectives The aim of this integrative review is to appraise healthcare professionals’ management of childhood diarrhea in low-income countries. Design Whittemore and Knafl integrative review method was used, in conjunction with the Reporting of Observational Studies in Epidemiology (STROBE) checklist for reporting observational cohort, case control and cross sectional studies. Method A comprehensive search performed from December 2014 to April 2015 used five databases and focused on observational studies of healthcare professional's management of childhood diarrhea in low-income countries. Results A total of 21 studies were included in the review. Eight studies used a survey design while three used some type of simulated client survey referring to a fictitious case of a child with diarrhea. Retrospective chart reviews were used in one study. Only one study used direct observation of the healthcare professionals during practice and the remaining eight used a combination of research designs. Studies were completed in South East Asia (n = 13), Sub-Saharan Africa (n = 6) and South America (n = 2). Conclusion Studies report that healthcare providers have adequate knowledge of the etiology of diarrhea and the severe signs of dehydration associated with diarrhea. More importantly, regardless of geographical settings and year of study publication, inconsistencies were noted in healthcare professionals’ physical examination, prescription of oral rehydration solutions, antibiotics and other medications as well as education provided to the primary caregivers. Factors other than knowledge about diarrhea were shown to significantly influence prescriptive behaviors of healthcare professionals. This review demonstrates that “knowledge is not enough” to ensure the appropriate use of oral rehydration solutions, zinc and antibiotics by healthcare professionals in the management of childhood diarrhea.
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  14. 14
    340079
    Peer Reviewed

    The Botswana Medical Eligibility Criteria Wheel: Adapting a tool to meet the needs of Botswana's family planning program.

    Kim CR; Kidula N; Rammipi MK; Mokganya L; Gaffield ML

    African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2016 Jun; 20(2):9-12.

    In efforts to strive for family planning repositioning in Botswana, the Ministry of Health convened a meeting to undertake an adaptation of the Medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use (MEC) wheel. The main objectives of this process were to present technical updates of the various contraceptive methods, to update the current medical conditions prevalent to Botswana and to adapt the MEC wheel to meet the needs of the Botswanian people. This commentary focuses on the adaptation process that occurred during the week-long stakeholder workshop. It concludes with the key elements learned from this process that can potentially inform countries who are interested in undergoing a similar exercise to strengthen their family planning needs.
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  15. 15
    378017
    Peer Reviewed

    Female Genital Mutilation: a visual reference and learning tool for health care professionals.

    Abdulcadir J; Catania L; Hindin MJ; Say L; Petignat P

    Obstetrics and Gynecology. 2016 Nov; 128(5):958-963.

    Female genital mutilation comprises all procedures that involve partial or total removal of the external female genitalia or injury to the female genital organs for nonmedical reasons. Health care providers for women and girls living with female genital mutilation have reported difficulties in recognizing, classifying, and recording female genital mutilation, which can adversely affect treatment of complications and discussions of the prevention of the practice in future generations. According to the World Health Organization, female genital mutilation is classified into four types, subdivided into subtypes. An agreed-upon classification of female genital mutilation is important for clinical practice, management, recording, and reporting, as well as for research on prevalence, trends, and consequences of female genital mutilation. We provide a visual reference and learning tool for health care professionals. The tool can be consulted by caregivers when unsure on the type of female genital mutilation diagnosed and used for training and surveys for monitoring the prevalence of female genital mutilation types and subtypes.
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  16. 16
    369691

    Guidelines not tramlines: the WHO safe childbirth checklist.

    Tingle J

    British Journal of Nursing. 2016 Mar 24-Apr 13; 25(6):344-5.

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  17. 17
    340313

    Pregnancy management in the context of Zika virus infection. Interim guidance update.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2016 May 13. [14] p. (WHO/ZIKV/MOC/16.2 Rev.1)

    The mosquito vector that carries the Zika virus thrives in warm climates and particularly in areas of poor living conditions. Pregnant women living in or travelling to such areas are at equal risk as the rest of the population of being infected by viruses borne by this vector. Maternal infection with Zika virus may go unnoticed as some people will not develop symptoms. Although Zika virus infection in pregnancy is typically a mild disease, an unusual increase in cases of congenital microcephaly, Guillain-Barré syndrome and other neurological complications in areas where outbreaks have occurred, has significantly raised concern for pregnant women and their families, as well as health providers and policy-makers. The aim of this document is to provide interim guidance for interventions to reduce the risk of maternal Zika virus infection and to manage potential complications during pregnancy. This guidance is based on the best available research evidence and covers areas prioritized by an international, multidisciplinary group of health care professionals and other stakeholders. Specifically, it presents guidance for preventing Zika virus infection; antenatal care and management of women with infection; and care during pregnancy for all pregnant women living in affected areas, with the aim of optimizing health outcomes for mothers and newborns. The guidance is intended to inform the development of national and local clinical protocols and health policies that relate to pregnancy care in the context of Zika virus transmission. It is not intended to provide a comprehensive practical guide for the prevention and management of Zika virus.
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  18. 18
    367020
    Peer Reviewed

    Implementation of the WHO safe childbirth checklist program at a tertiary care setting in Sri Lanka: a developing country experience.

    Patabendige M; Senanayake H

    BMC Pregnancy and Childbirth. 2015; 15:12.

    BACKGROUND: To study institutionalization of the World Health Organization's Safe Childbirth Checklist (SCC) in a tertiary care center in Sri Lanka. METHOD: A hospital-based, prospective observational study was conducted in the De Soysa Hospital for Women, Colombo, Sri Lanka. Healthcare workers were educated regarding the SCC, which was to be used for each woman admitted to the labor room during the study period. A qualitatively pretested, self-administered questionnaire was given to all nursing and midwifery staff to assess knowledge and attitudes towards the checklist. Each item of the SCC was reviewed for adherence. RESULTS: A total of 824 births in which the checklist used were studied. There were a total of births 1800 during the period, giving an adoption rate of 45.8%. Out of the 170 health workers in the hospital (nurses, midwives and nurse midwives) 98 answered the questionnaire (response rate = 57.6%). The average number of childbirth practices checked in the checklist was 21 out of 29 (95% CI 20.2, 21.3). Educating the mother to seek help during labor, after delivery and after discharge from hospital, seeking an assistant during labor, early breast-feeding, maternal HIV infection and discussing contraceptive options were checked least often. The mean level of knowledge on the checklist among health workers was 60.1% (95% CI 57.2, 63.1). Attitudes for acceptance of using the checklist were satisfactory. Average adherence to checklist practices was 71.3%. Sixty eight (69.4%) agreed that the Checklist stimulates inter-personal communication and teamwork. Increased workload, poor enthusiasm of health workers towards new additions to their routine schedule and level of user-friendliness of Checklist were limitations to its greater use. CONCLUSIONS: Amongst users, the attitude towards the checklist was satisfactory. Adoption rate amongst all workers was 45.8% and knowledge regarding the checklist was 60.1%. These two factors are probably linked. Therefore prior to introducing it to a facility awareness about the value and correct use of the SCC needs to be increased, while giving attention to satisfactory staffing levels.
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  19. 19
    340832

    Provisional remarks on Zika virus infection in pregnant women: Document for health care professionals.

    Pan American Health Organization [PAHO]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Regional Office for the Americas

    Montevideo, Uruguay, PAHO, 2016 Jan 25. [22] p.

    The aim of this document is to provide health care professionals in charge of the care of pregnant women with updated information based on the best evidence available for the prevention of infection, timely diagnosis, suggested therapy and monitoring of pregnant women, and notification of cases to the competent health authorities. The information presented in this document was updated on January 22, 2016; it may be further altered if new evidence appears on the effects / consequences of Zika virus Infection in pregnant women and their children. New updates may also be found regularly at www.paho.org/viruszika. (Excerpt)
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  20. 20
    340711

    Guideline: Managing possible serious bacterial infection in young infants when referral is not feasible.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [52] p.

    This guideline, developed by a panel of international experts and informed by a thorough review of existing evidence, contains a number of recommendations on the use of antibiotics for neonates (0–28 days old) and young infants (0–59 days old) with PSBI in order to reduce young infant mortality rates. The guideline is intended for use in resource-limited settings in situations when families do not accept or cannot access referral care. The goal of the guideline is to provide clinical guidance on the simplest antibiotic regimens that are both safe and effective for outpatient treatment of clinical severe infections and fast breathing (pneumonia) in children 0–59 days old. In addition, the guideline seeks to provide programmatic guidance on the role of CHWs and home visits in identifying signs of serious infections in neonates and young infants.
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  21. 21
    340674

    WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of maternal peripartum infections: Highlights and key messages from the World Health Organization's 2015 global recommendations.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; Maternal and Child Survival Program

    [Geneva, Switzerland], WHO, 2015 Sep. [6] p. (WHO/RHR/15.19; WHO/MCA/15.01)

    Bacterial infections around the time of childbirth account for about one-tenth of maternal deaths and contribute to severe morbidity and long-term disability for many affected women. Standard infection prevention and control measures are a cornerstone of peripartum infection prevention (e.g., hand hygiene and use of clean equipment). WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of maternal peripartum infections include both recommended and non-recommended interventions during labour, childbirth, and the postpartum period. Clinical monitoring, early detection, and prompt treatment of peripartum infection with an appropriate antibiotic regimen are essential for reducing death and morbidity in affected women. Recommendations for antibiotic prophylaxis / treatment for specific indications balance health benefits for the mother and newborn with safety concerns (e.g., adverse effects) and the public health imperative to control antibiotic resistance.
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  22. 22
    340672

    WHO recommendations for prevention and treatment of maternal peripartum infections.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2015. [80] p.

    The goal of the present guideline is to consolidate guidance for effective interventions that are needed to reduce the global burden of maternal infections and their complications around the time of childbirth. This forms part of WHO’s efforts to improve the quality of care for leading causes of maternal death, especially those clustered around the time of childbirth, in the post-MDG era. Specifically, it presents evidence-based recommendations on interventions for preventing and treating genital tract infections during labour, childbirth or the puerperium, with the aim of improving outcomes for both mothers and newborns.The primary audience for this guideline is health professionals who are responsible for developing national and local health protocols and policies, as well as managers of maternal and child health programmes and policy-makers in all settings. The guideline will also be useful to those directly providing care to pregnant women, including obstetricians, midwives, nurses and general practitioners. The information in this guideline will be useful for developing job aids and tools for both pre- and inservice training of health workers to enhance their delivery of care to prevent and treat maternal peripartum infections. (Excerpts)
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  23. 23
    385625
    Peer Reviewed

    Feasibility and validity of using WHO adolescent job aid algorithms by health workers for reproductive morbidities among adolescent girls in rural North India.

    Archana S; Nongkrynh B; Anand K; Pandav CS

    BMC Health Services Research. 2015 Sep 21; 15(1):400.

    Background: High prevalence of reproductive morbidities is seen among adolescents in India. Health workers play an important role in providing health services in the community, including the adolescent reproductive health services. A study was done to assess the feasibility of training female health workers (FHWs) in the classification and management of selected adolescent girls' reproductive health problems according to modified WHO algorithms. Methods: The study was conducted between Jan-Sept 2011 in Northern India. Thirteen FHWs were trained regarding adolescent girls' reproductive health as per WHO Adolescent Job-Aid booklet. A pre and post-test assessment of the knowledge of the FHWs was carried out. All FHWs were given five modified WHO algorithms to classify and manage common reproductive morbidities among adolescent girls. All the FHWs applied the algorithms on at least ten adolescent girls at their respective sub-centres. Simultaneously, a medical doctor independently applied the same algorithms in all girls. Classification of the condition was followed by relevant management and advice provided in the algorithm. Focus group discussion with the FHWs was carried out to receive their feedback. Results: After training the median score of the FHWs increased from 19.2 to 25.2 (p - 0.0071). Out of 144 girls examined by the FHWs 108 were classified as true positives and 30 as true negatives and agreement as measured by kappa was 0.7 (0.5-0.9). Sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were 94.3 % (88.2-97.4), 78.9 % (63.6-88.9), 92.5 % (86.0-96.2), and 83.3 % (68.1-92.1) respectively. Discussion: A consistent and significant difference between pre and post training knowledge scores of the FHWs were observed and hence it was possible to use the modified Job Aid algorithms with ease. Limitation of this study was the munber of FHWs trained was small. Issues such as time management during routine work, timing of training, overhead cost of training etc were not taken into account. Conclusions: Training was successful in increasing the knowledge of the FHWs about adolescent girls' reproductive health issues. The FHWs were able to satisfactorily classify the common adolescent girls' problems using the modified WHO algorithms.
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  24. 24
    337718

    WHO recommendations for augmentation of labour.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2014. [64] p.

    Optimizing outcomes for women in labour at the global level requires evidence-based guidance of health workers to improve care through appropriate patient selection and use of effective interventions. In this regard, WHO published recommendations for induction of labour in 2011. The goal of the present guideline is to consolidate the guidance for effective interventions that are needed to reduce the global burden of prolonged labour and its consequences. The primary target audience includes health professionals responsible for developing national and local health protocols and policies, as well as obstetricians, midwives, nurses, general medical practitioners, managers of maternal and child health programmes, and public health policy-makers in all settings. Augmentation of labour is the process of stimulating the uterus to increase the frequency, duration and intensity of contractions after the onset of spontaneous labour. It has commonly been used to treat delayed labour when poor uterine contractions are assessed to be the underlying cause. The WHO technical consultation adopted 20 recommendations covering practices relating to the diagnosis, prevention and treatment of delayed progress in the first stage of labour, and supportive care for women undergoing labour augmentation. For each recommendation, the quality of the supporting evidence was graded as very low, low, moderate or high. The contributing experts qualified the strength of these recommendations (as strong or weak) by considering the quality of the evidence and other factors, including values and preferences of stakeholders, the magnitude of effect, the balance of benefits versus harms, resource use and the feasibility of each recommendation. To ensure that each recommendation is correctly understood and used in practice, additional remarks and an evidence summary have also been prepared, and these are provided in the full document, below each recommendation. Guideline users should refer to this information in the full version of the guideline if they are in any doubt as to the basis for any of the recommendations. (Excerpts)
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  25. 25
    380397
    Peer Reviewed

    Interpretation of World Health Organization growth charts for assessing infant malnutrition: a randomised controlled trial.

    Ahmad UN; Yiwombe M; Chisepo P; Cole TJ; Heikens GT; Kerac M

    Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health. 2014 Jan; 50(1):32-9.

    AIMS: The study aims to assess the effects of switching from National Center for Health Statistics (NCHS) growth references to World Health Organization (WHO) growth standards on health-care workers' decisions about malnutrition in infants aged <6 months. METHODS: We conducted a single blind randomised crossover trial involving 78 health-care workers (doctors, clinical officers, health service assistants) in Southern Malawi. Participants were offered hypothetical clinical scenarios with the same infant plotted on NCHS-based weight-for-age charts and again on WHO-based charts. Additional scenarios compared growth charts with a single final weight against charts with the same final weight plus a preceding growth trend. Reported (i) level of concern, (ii) referral suggestions and (iii) feeding advice were elicited with a questionnaire. RESULTS: Even after adjusting for health-care worker type and experience, using WHO rather than NCHS charts increased: (i) concern: aOR 4.4 (95% CI 2.4-8.1); (ii) odds of referral: aOR 5.1 (95% CI 2.4-10.8); and (iii) odds of feeding advice which would interrupt exclusive breastfeeding (aOR 2.4, 95% CI 1.2-4.9). A preceding steady growth trend line did not affect concern, referral or feeding advice. CONCLUSIONS: Health-care workers take insufficient account of linear growth trend, clinical and feeding status when interpreting a low weight-for-age plot. Because more infants <6 months fall below low centile lines on WHO growth charts, their use may increase inappropriate referrals and risks undermining already low rates of exclusive breastfeeding. To avoid their being misinterpreted in this way, WHO charts need accompanying guidelines and training materials that recognise and address this possible adverse effect. (c) 2013 The Authors. Journal of Paediatrics and Child Health (c) 2013 Paediatrics and Child Health Division (Royal Australasian College of Physicians).
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