Your search found 6 Results

  1. 1
    302644

    FHI's quick reference chart for the WHO medical eligibility criteria for contraceptive use. To initiate or continue the use of combined oral contraceptive (COC), Noristerat (NET-EN), Depo-Provera (DMPA), copper intrauterine device (Cu-IUD).

    Family Health International [FHI]

    [Research Triangle Park, North Carolina], FHI, 2004 Mar. [1] p.

    I/C (Initiation/Continuation): A woman may fall into either one category or another, depending on whether she is initiating or continuing to use a method. For example, a client with current PID who wants to initiate IUD use would be considered as Category 4, and should not have an IUD inserted. However, if she develops PID while using the IUD, she would be considered as Category 2. This means she could generally continue using the IUD and be treated for PID with the IUD in place. Where I/C is not marked, a woman with that condition falls in the category indicated - whether or not she is initiating or continuing use of the method. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    296206
    Peer Reviewed

    Use of combined oral contraceptives among women with migraine and nonmigrainous headaches: a systematic review.

    Curtis KM; Mohllajee AP; Peterson HB

    Contraception. 2006 Feb; 73(2):189-194.

    This systematic review examines evidence evaluating whether women with headaches who use combined oral contraceptives (COCs) have a greater risk of stroke than women with headaches who do not use COCs. We searched MEDLINE for articles published from 1966 through March 2005 relevant to headaches and COC use as risk factors for stroke. Of the 79 articles identified, nine met our selection criteria (eight reports of six observational studies plus one meta-analysis). All studies reported specifically on migraine headaches. Evidence from six case-control studies suggested that COC users with a history of migraine were two to four times as likely to have an ischemic stroke as nonusers with a history of migraine. The odds ratios for ischemic stroke ranged from 6 to almost 14 for COC users with migraine compared with nonusers without migraine. The three studies that provided evidence on hemorrhagic stroke reported low or no risk associated with migraine or with COC use. (author's)
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  3. 3
    131082

    Headache, migraine and oral contraceptives.

    CONTRACEPTION REPORT. 1998 Jan; 8(6):12-14, 16.

    Many physicians will not provide oral contraceptives (OCs) to women with a history of migraine due to concerns about increasing the risk of a cerebrovascular accident. The World Health Organization's revised medical eligibility criteria indicate that only women with serious migraine that includes focal neurologic symptoms should be cautioned against OC use. This article reviews the research evidence on headache, migraine, and OCs. The recent literature suggests that healthy, nonsmoking women using low-dose OCs (35 mcg of estrogen or less) have no increased risk of stroke. Although the presence of diabetes, hypertension, and/or migraine appears to be associated with an increased risk of cerebral thromboembolism, the use of OCs does not synergistically add to the risk. It is important, however, for physicians to differentiate between tension headaches, migraines with aura (classic migraine), and migraines without aura (common migraine). Women with classic migraine should avoid OCs if an alternative method of contraception can be used. Common migraine is not a contraindication to OC use, although the frequency and severity of headaches during OC use should be monitored. OC discontinuation should be discontinued, at least temporarily, if previously existing migraine suddenly worsens, headaches that are qualitatively different than the type usually experienced by the patient occur, headaches wake a patient from sleep, or double vision or loss of vision occur.
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  4. 4
    083186

    Detecting pre-eclampsia: a practical guide. Using and maintaining blood pressure equipment.

    Guidotti R; Jobson D

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], Division of Family Health, Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme, 1992. iii, 46 p. (WHO/MCH/MSM/92.3)

    WHO's Maternal Health and Safe Motherhood Programme has guidelines for health workers to detect early signs and symptoms of preeclampsia and to provide early treatment of mild preeclampsia to prevent severe preeclampsia. Health workers must take accurate blood pressure measurements, test for protein in urine, and identify substantial edema. This manual helps them determine when blood pressure equipment does not work accurately and know how to fix it. The manual covers all parts of the sphygmomanometer (blood pressure machine): the cuff, rubber bladder, the aneroid sphygmomanometer, stethoscope, and pump and control valve. Health workers should know that certain conditions elevate blood pressure in normal patients. They can alleviate them to obtain accurate blood pressure measurements. These conditions are fear, cold, full urinary bladder, exercise, tight clothes around the arm, obesity, standing up, and lying on the back. Health workers should place either the left or right arm on a table or on another object thereby allowing the muscles to relax. The upper arm needs to be at the same level of the heart. It is important that all levels of health workers be adequately trained in taking blood pressures correctly. Training should not occur in busy and noisy clinics. The trainer should use a double stethoscope to determine whether the trainees correctly identify the Korotkoff sounds. Health workers must feel pregnant women how to collect a midstream urine sample, free of vaginal secretions and discharges, so the health workers can test for protein in the urine. Its presence indicates kidney failure. Diagnosis of mild preeclampsia includes a blood pressure at least 140/90 mmHg or an increase of 30 mmHg systolic or 15 mmHg diastolic and at least 300 g/l protein in urine. In addition to these signs, sudden onset of edema of face and/or hands, severe headaches, great reduction of urine output, epigastric pain, visual disturbances, and reduced fetal movement are reliable signs of severe preeclampsia.
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  5. 5
    069321

    Hypertensive diseases of pregnancy.

    WOMEN'S GLOBAL NETWORK FOR REPRODUCTIVE RIGHTS NEWSLETTER. 1991 Jul-Sep; (36):21-2.

    A meeting in Singapore of principal investigators from 7 countries in a WHO collaborative study on hypertensive disease of pregnancy, also called pre-eclampsia or eclampsia, pointed out women at risk, suggested management guidelines, and summarized operations research projects involving administration of aspirin or calcium supplements. Hypertensive disease of pregnancy may ultimately end in fatal seizures. It is often marked by warning signs of severe headaches and facial and peripheral edema. A survey in Jamaica found that 0.72% of a group of 10,000 pregnant women had eclamptic seizures. These were the cause of almost one-third of all obstetric deaths in the period 1981-1983. 10.4% of the pregnant women had hypertension, and half of these had proteinuria. Associated risk factors were primigravida, age >30, abnormal weight gain, edema, 1+ proteinuria. A phased program of management guidelines for identifying and treating affected women is being instituted in half of Jamaica's parishes. An operations research project involves administration of low-dose aspirin vs. placebo. Another controlled trial, in Peru, is testing calcium supplements. A third trial in Argentina will compare 2 drug regimens.
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  6. 6
    782083
    Peer Reviewed

    Multinational comparative clinical evaluation of two long-acting injectable contraceptive steroids: norethisterone oenanthate and medroxyprogesterone acetate: 2. bleeding patterns and side effects.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction. Task Force on Long-Acting Systemic Agents for Fertility Regulation

    Contraception. 1978 May; 17(5):395-406.

    A WHO sponsored comparative trail (9 centers) studied the bleeding patterns and side effects experienced by 1678 women using injectable (every 12 weeks) norethisterone enanthate (NOR) and depot-medroxyprogesterone (DMPA). 388.8 women-years of menstrual experience with NOR and 372.5 with DMPA were studied. The percentage of women with total amenorrhea with DMPA was significantly higher than with NOR for all injection intervals. The porportion of women with total amenorrhea increased significantly over time with both drugs (chi-square=33.9 for NOR and 73.4 for DMPA; P < .001). After 1 year, 35% of DMPA and 8.6% of NOR users had total amenorrhea. With NOR, the cycle length distribution changed markedly over time, with the percentage of short cycles under 25 days diminishing as the percentage of long cycles in excess of 46 days increased. In contrast, DMPA held cycle length patterns more or less constant. Length of bleeding and spotting episodes were significantly greater with DMPA. The mean number of bleeding/spotting days decreased over time with both drugs; the difference from the 1st to 4th injection was statistically significant (P < .001). Though the overwhelming majority of women experienced abnormal cycles with both drugs, the percentage of normal cycles remained fairly constant during consecutive intervals. Headache was the most frequently reported complaint: 10.7% of DMPA and 6.9% of NOR users. Other nonmenstrual side effects were reported with similar frequencies in both groups.
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