Your search found 58 Results

  1. 1
    374611

    ‘Leaving no one behind’ in action: observations from FGE’sseven-year experience working with civil society.

    United Nations. UN Women. Fund for Gender Equality [FGE]

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 8 p.

    This brief contains observations from the Fund for Gender Equality’s (FGE) seven-year experience working with civil society. Gender equality is at the forefront of the 2030 Development Agenda. The Sustainable Development Goals include a stand-alone goal to advance equality, and gender-related targets mainstreamed across the Global Goals. If something has opened a door for drastic progress in the lives of women and girls worldwide, it is the principle of leaving no one behind. Leaving no one behind means prioritizing human beings’ dignity and placing the progress of the most marginalized communities first—women and girls being all too often at the top of the list. It urges us to address the structural causes of inequality and marginalization that affect them. This ambitious undertaking requires a collective effort to identify and share effective strategies to operationalize this concept. This brief offers practical insights based on the experience of the FGE in working with marginalized populations through its support to women-led civil society organizations (CSOs).
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  2. 2
    335813

    Zimbabwe: An AIDS strategy focused and aligned with our vision and the United Nations targets for 2015. Case study.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 2013. [3] p. (Case Study)

    This case study looks at how Zimbabwe evolved its work with UNAIDS and the Global Fund for HIV, Tuberculosis and Malaria to fit the New Funding Model for the Global Fund, and received a US$311 million three-year grant --- equal to the combined total of HIV assistance the country received from the Global Fund in the past decade. This case study examines how a country whose AIDS response was effective, people-centred and prioritized, but heavily under-funded, seized the chance to take its response to a new level, and the part UNAIDS played.
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  3. 3
    334254

    United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. Together for a better tomorrow.

    Lewis K

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2011]. [21] p.

    Today, violence against women is a fact of life in communities and countries across the world. It transcends the bounds of geography, race, culture, class and religion. It ranges from intimate partner violence to the use of rape as a weapon of war, from sexual harassment in public spaces to harmful practices like child marriage. But tomorrow can be different. Societies change, sometimes very fast. Behaviours, norms and institutions that are commonplace and unremarkable in the eyes of one generation can be rejected by the next. The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, established in 1996, embodies the heartening awakening of global consciousness. The only multilateral grant-making mechanism exclusively devoted to supporting efforts to end violence against women and girls, the UN Trust Fund works with partners across the world to secure much-needed services for women and girls affected by violence and to invest in long-term solutions to prevent violence from happening in the first place. For fifteen years, the UN Trust Fund has supported innovative, effective initiatives designed to transform the ways in which people think and act. The brochure “Together for a Better Tomorrow” highlights the work of the UN Trust Fund and its partners, delivering on the international community’s commitment to making good on its promises to end violence against women and girls.
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  4. 4
    333453

    Technical support facilities: Helping to build an efficient and sustainable AIDS response. UNAIDS TSF 5 years report, 2011.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011 Oct. [60] p. (UNAIDS / JC2167E)

    This report highlights the role that the Technical Support Facilities (TSF) have played in Africa and Asia to strengthen countries capacities to fund, plan, manage and coordinate effective, larger scale HIV programs. Established by UNAIDS in 2005, the TSFs have provided support to over 70 countries through 50,000 days of technical assistance and capacity development.
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  5. 5
    333328

    Maximizing returns on investments: UNAIDS support to countries to make Global Fund money work.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 2011 Jun. [24] p. (UNAIDS / JC2141E)

    This publication describes how the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS (UNAIDS) partners with country partners and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (Global Fund) to strengthen the global response to AIDS and to accelerate progress towards universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support, and the achievement of the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs).
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  6. 6
    333122

    Orphans and vulnerable children (OVC) programming in Global Fund HIV / AIDS grants in Kenya.

    Pfleiderer R; Kantai O

    Washington, D.C., Futures Group, Health Policy Initiative, 2010 Sep. [40] p. (USAID Contract No. GPO-I-01-05-00040-00)

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is a major funder of HIV programs worldwide, including programs that support orphans and vulnerable children (OVC). Following on a desk review of OVC-related content in Global Fund HIV / AIDS grants, this study in Kenya sought to explore the country-level processes and issues that affect inclusion of OVC goals and strategies in Global Fund country proposals and grants. The study involved interviews with 23 OVC stakeholders, including representatives of government ministries, international agencies, the country coordinating mechanism, principal and sub-recipients, NGOs, faith-based organizations, and OVC network members.
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  7. 7
    332478

    Guidelines for integrating sexual and reproductive health into the HIV / AIDS component of country coordinated proposals to be submitted to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria: Round 8 and beyond. Updated 18 February 2008.

    Doupe A

    [London, England], Interact Worldwide, 2008 Feb 18. 36 p.

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, a unique multilateral partnership that has proven itself to be a successful mechanism for fighting these diseases, is an important funding vehicle for innovative responses to the three diseases, including SRH-HIV / AIDS integration. In preparation for upcoming and future Global Fund funding rounds, Guidelines for Integrating Sexual and Reproductive Health into the HIV / AIDS Component of Country Coordinated Proposals to be submitted to the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is designed to support Country Coordinated Mechanisms (CCMs) to develop Country Coordinated Proposals for the Global Fund that integrate sexual and reproductive health into the HIV / AIDS component. (Excerpt)
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  8. 8
    332316

    Trends in development assistance and domestic financing for health in implementing countries. Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria third replenishment (2011-2013).

    Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria

    Geneva, Switzerland, Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, 2010 Mar. [26] p.

    Donors at the Mid-Term Review of the Global Fund's Second Voluntary Replenishment 2008- 2010 held in Caceres in March 2009 requested a report on the progress made by African countries with regard to the Abuja Declaration. This declaration, adopted at a 2001 summit of the Organisation of African Unity, was a commitment of African states to allocate at least 15 percent of their annual budgets to the health sector. Donors at the Mid-Term Review meeting also requested information concerning counterpart funding from middle-income countries. 2. This update begins with an explanation of current trends in development assistance for health (DAH) and the role that these external resources play in the total expenditure on health in low- and middle-income countries. It examines progress in 52 African countries and a sample of 20 non-African middle-income countries. It utilizes data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) / Development Assistance Committee's (DAC) aggregated aid statistics and the Creditor Reporting System (CRS), the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation (IHME) Development Assistance for Health database, the World Bank Development Indicators and the World Health Organization (WHO) National Health Accounts database. 3. Since the Abuja Summit in 2001, many African countries have increased the proportion of their national budget allocated to health. Over half of African countries recorded increases in health budget allocations between 2001 and 2007. By 2007, three African countries had achieved the Abuja target of 15 percent, and three others had exceeded this amount. For all 52 countries, the average general government expenditure on health as a percentage of total government expenditure rose marginally from 8.8 percent in 2001 to 9.0 percent in 2007. 4. The proportion of gross domestic product (GDP) devoted to health also increased marginally in the period 2001-2007, from 5.0 percent in 2001 to 5.3 percent in 2007. Substantial flows of DAH to these countries (amounting to US$ 4.7 billion in 2007) have contributed to these increased total expenditures on health. 5. Funding of the health sector in the lower-income countries examined contains a substantial proportion of DAH. In the middle-income countries examined, this funding is predominantly from domestic sources and external resources only contribute a negligible proportion of the total expenditure on health. In nearly two-thirds of the middle-income countries assessed for this paper, external resources contributed less than 1 percent of the total expenditure on health in 2007. 6. In the current economic climate, the likelihood of African governments significantly increasing the proportional allocation to the health sector is not encouraging. With the current low per-capita expenditure on health in these countries, inflows of external resources remain critical if African countries are to run national programs at a scale necessary to achieve national and global targets in the fight against the three diseases. 7. Global Fund policy requires lower-middle income countries and upper-middle income countries to contribute substantially to their national program costs, for a number of reasons: to ensure national ownership of programs and their longer-term sustainability of programs, as well as to ensure sufficient funds are available to lower-income countries. In line with the Paris Declaration on aid effectiveness and in an attempt to avoid imposing specific further reporting requirements, it has not been the practice to request middle income countries to identify specific program components that they will fund. It is recognized that data in this domain needs to be strengthened and systematically collected and the Secretariat will explore ways in which to do that with technical partners in a manner that is consistent with aid effectiveness principles. The reform of the Global Fund business model, known as the architecture review, presents an opportunity for progress in this work.
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  9. 9
    332100

    Supporting community responses to malaria: A training manual to strengthen capacities of community based organizations in application processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV / AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria.

    Odindo M; Mangelsdorf A

    Cologne, Germany, STOP MALARIA NOW!, 2009 Nov. 53 p.

    This training manual is a product of the STOP MALARIA NOW! advocacy campaign and aims to support community responses to malaria. In particular, this manual aims to improve knowledge and skills of Community Based Organizations (CBOs) in application processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV / AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria. The contents are based on results of the needs assessment 'Capacity Needs of CBOs in Kenya in Terms of Application Processes of the Global Fund to Fight HIV /AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM)', conducted in June and July 2009.
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  10. 10
    332082

    Report to Congress by the U.S. Global AIDS Coordinator on the involvement of faith-based organizations in activities of the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria.

    United States. Office of the United States Global AIDS Coordinator

    [Washington, D.C.], Office of the United States Global AIDS Coordinator, 2008 May. 40 p.

    The Administration provides this Report pursuant to Section 625(b) of the Department of State, Foreign Operations, and Related Programs Appropriations Act, 2008 (Division J, Public Law 110-161), which requires the U.S. Secretary of State to submit a report to the Committees on Appropriations "on the involvement of faith-based organizations in Global Fund Programs. The report shall include (1) on a country-by-country basis -(A) a description of the amount of grants and subgrants provided to faith-based organizations; and (B) a detailed description of the involvement of faith-based organizations in the Country Coordinating Mechanism (CCM) process of the Global Fund; and (2) a description of actions the Global Fund is taking to enhance the involvement of faith-based organizations in the CCM process, particularly in countries in which the involvement of faith-based organizations has been underrepresented.
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  11. 11
    331805

    A practical guide to integrating reproductive health and HIV / AIDS into grant proposals to the Global Fund.

    Hardee K; Gay J; Dunn-Georgiou E

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Action International, 2009 Sep. 61 p.

    Starting in recent proposal rounds, The Global Fund for AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM) has stated more explicitly that countries can include reproductive health as part of their proposals on AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria, as long as a justification is provided on the impact of reproductive health (RH) on reducing one of the three diseases. This document is for countries and organizations, including CCMs, government and nongovernmental organizations and civil society organizations, to help in integrating reproductive health, including family planning (RH) and HIV / AIDS in proposals submitted to the Global Fund. The document takes a country approach to integration since the Global Fund seeks to support proposals that build on and strengthen national programs. (Excerpt)
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  12. 12
    322582

    Making the money work: UNAIDS technical support to countries.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, [2007]. [15] p.

    Funding for AIDS has grown significantly over the past decade. In 2007, US$10 billion is expected to be available for the AIDS response - about one third coming from developing countries - compared to less than US$300 million in 1995. The substantial increase in financial resources has allowed countries to scale up their AIDS response with the ultimate goal of achieving universal access to HIV prevention, treatment, care and support. However, many countries face difficulties in effectively implementing large-scale grants made available by funding bodies such as the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria, the World Bank, and bilateral actors. They require rapid and adequate technical support to effectively implement AIDS programmes. To address this implementation challenge, UNAIDS has taken a leading role in "making the money work" in countries. It has invested significant resources over the past two years in strengthening countries' national AIDS programmes, particularly through the establishment of Technical Support Facilities in five regions. (excerpt)
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  13. 13
    321022
    Peer Reviewed

    Global Fund-supported programmes' contribution to international targets and the Millennium Development Goals: An initial analysis.

    Komatsu R; Low-Beer D; Schwartlander B

    Bulletin of the World Health Organization. 2007 Oct; 85(10):805-811.

    The Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria is one of the largest funders to fight these diseases. This paper discusses the programmatic contribution of Global Fund-supported programmes towards achieving international targets and Millennium Development Goals, using data from Global Fund grants. Results until June 2006 of 333 grants supported by the Global Fund in 127 countries were aggregated and compared against international targets for HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. Progress reports to the Global Fund secretariat were used as a basis to calculate results. Service delivery indicators for antiretrovirals (ARV) for HIV/AIDS, case detection under the DOTS strategy for tuberculosis (DOTS) and insecticide-treated nets (ITNs) for malaria prevention were selected to estimate programmatic contributions to international targets for the three diseases. Targets of Global Fund-supported programmes were projected based on proposals for Rounds 1 to 4 and compared to international targets for 2009. Results for Global Fund-supported programmes total 544 000 people on ARV, 1.4 million on DOTS and 11.3 million for ITNs by June 2006. Global Fund-supported programmes contributed 18% of international ARV targets, 29% of DOTS targets and 9% of ITNs in sub-Saharan Africa by mid-2006. Existing Global Fund-supported programmes have agreed targets that are projected to account for 19% of the international target for ARV delivery expected for 2009, 28% of the international target for DOTS and 84% of ITN targets in sub-Saharan Africa. Global Fund-supported programmes have already contributed substantially to international targets by mid-2006, but there is a still significant gap. Considerably greater financial support is needed, particularly for HIV, in order to achieve international targets for 2009. (author's)
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  14. 14
    318624
    Peer Reviewed

    Tuberculosis and HIV coinfection: Genesis of the supplement and sponsors' contribution.

    Hoxie JA; Miller V; Walker B

    Journal of Infectious Diseases. 2007 Aug; 196 Suppl 1:S4-.

    This supplement to the Journal of Infectious Diseases on tuberculosis (TB)/HIV coinfection came together as a result of a collaboration between the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-funded Centers for AIDS Research (CFARs) at Harvard University and at the University of Pennsylvania, and the Forum for Collaborative HIV Research. It is based on 2 programs addressing TB/HIV coinfection research challenges. A steering committee, consisting of Bruce Walker, Edward Nardell, Megan Murray, and Eric Rubin (Harvard University); Gerald Friedland (Yale University); and James Hoxie (University of Pennsylvania); with the support of the national network of CFARs, organized a symposium entitled "Confronting TB/HIV Co-infection" that was held on 30 June 2005 at Harvard University. The Forum for Collaborative HIV Research, together with the International AIDS Society and the Agence National de Recherches sur le Sida et les Hepatites Virales, with special support from Tibotec, sponsored a special session entitled "HIV/TB: New Visions, New Directions" during the 3rd International AIDS Society Conference on HIV Pathogenesis and Treatment in Rio de Janeiro on 25 July 2005, followed by a roundtable discussion with representatives from the World Health Organization HIV/ AIDS and Stop TB departments; the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria; the NIH; the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC); and leaders from the pharmaceutical industry, research networks, and advocacy organizations. (excerpt)
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  15. 15
    314927

    Reviewing World Bank-financed health projects in Asia.

    Krishnamurthy R

    ARROWs for Change. 2003; 9(3):12.

    The World Bank is financing health sector reforms in low-income and middle-income countries of Asia. A review of community participation and accountability strategies within nine World Bank-financed projects (see table) spanning nine Asian countries reveals that most of them envisage some form of community and NGO participation and accountability. Women constitute an important target group of all the nine projects, with maternal and child health services being a priority in eight and improving access to contraception in five. However, few projects envisage community participation in design and policy formulation, provision of comprehensive sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services, and services for adolescents, men and sex workers. (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    311119

    Achieving the Millennium Development Goals in sub-Saharan Africa: a macroeconomic monitoring framework.

    Agenor PR; Bayraktar N; Moreira EP; El Aynaoui K

    World Economy. 2006; 29(11):1519-1547.

    3,000 Africans die every day of a mosquito bite. Can you think about that, malaria? That's not acceptable in the 21st century and we can stop it. And water-borne illnesses - dirty water takes another 3,000 lives - children, mothers, sisters . . . If we're to take this issue seriously, and we must, because in 50 years, you know, when they [G-8 Heads of State] look back at this moment . . . they'll talk about what we did or didn't do about this continent bursting into flames. It is the most extraordinary thing to watch people dying three in a bed, two on top and one underneath, as I have seen in Lilongwe, Malawi. I mean, it is an astonishing thing. And it's avoidable. It's an avoidable catastrophe. You saw what happened with the tsunami. You see the outpouring, you see the dramatic pictures. Well, there's a tsunami happening every month in Africa, but it's an avoidable catastrophe. It is not a natural calamity. (author's)
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  17. 17
    309889

    A healthy partnership -- a case study of the MOH contract to KHANA for disbursement of World Bank funds for HIV / AIDS in Cambodia.

    Wilkinson D

    [Brighton, England], International HIV / AIDS Alliance, 2005 Mar. 12 p.

    In 1998, the Cambodian Ministry of Health was experiencing difficulties in disbursing World Bank funds earmarked for local NGOs/CBOs, and in 1999, contracted Khana to manage the disbursement process. Given the scarcity of documented successful government-NGO/CBO disbursement initiatives, the Alliance commissioned a case study of this mechanism of making World Bank funds more accessible to civil society organisations. This report of the case study outlines the background and context to adopting the disbursement mechanism, explains the selection of the disbursing agency and the process of contract negotiation, details the nature and quantity of the disbursement, and identifies the strengths, weaknesses and lessons learned from this model. (excerpt)
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  18. 18
    293690

    Fifth round of funding adds $729 to fight against diseases.

    Mera. 2006 Jan; (21):3-4.

    The Global Fund is a unique global public-private partnership dedicated to attracting and disbursing additional resources to prevent and treat HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis and malaria. This partnership between governments, civil society, the private sector and affected communities represents a new approach to international health financing. The Fund works in close collaboration with other bilateral and multilateral organisations to supplement existing efforts dealing with the three diseases. Apart from a high standard of technical quality, the Global Fund attaches no conditions to any of its grants. It is not an implementing agency, instead relying on local ownership and planning to ensure that new resources are directed to programmes on the frontline of this global effort to reach those most in need. Its performance-based approach to grant-making is designed to ensure that funds are used efficiently and create real change for people and communities. (excerpt)
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  19. 19
    305870

    Final technical report to the United States Agency for International Development (USAID): Strengthening Nutrition Management in the Occupied Palestinian Territory, Grant No. 294-G-00-04-00208-00.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2006. 6 p. (USAID Development Experience Clearinghouse DocID / Order No: PD-ACH-528; USAID Grant No. 294-G-00-04-00208-00)

    The general objective of the project is to strengthen the MoH Nutrition Department (ND) in order to achieve an effective, sustainable and functioning body in the area of nutrition. The Nutrition Department will be in charge of policy, planning, monitoring, evaluation and coordination, considering both short-term emergency interventions and long-term activities related to nutrition. (excerpt)
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  20. 20
    304809

    Making services youth-friendly with limited resources.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    New York, New York, IPPF, WHR, 2005 Jan. [2] p. (IPPF / WHR Spotlight on Youth)

    For more than a decade, the International Planned Parenthood Federation/Western Hemisphere Region (IPPF/WHR) and its member associations in Latin America and the Caribbean have worked to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of adolescents and young people. Early on, it became clear that effectively reaching youth would require formulating and adopting a new model of youth-friendly service provision. Creating these services would involve sensitizing and training staff to young people's rights and needs; creating separate waiting rooms, spaces, or clinics where youth would feel comfortable; and developing educational materials that would be attractive to youth. In November 2002, IPPF/WHR held a workshop with medical providers and youth program coordinators from 11 associations in Latin America to improve their capacity to provide youth-friendly sexual and reproductive health (SRH) services. The workshop addressed: understanding how adolescent needs differ from adult needs; viewing SRH and services through the framework of youth rights; components of youth-friendly services and their implementation; communicating with youth about SRH; and review and distribution of tools for strengthening youth-friendly services. (excerpt)
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  21. 21
    297244

    WHO grant helps Ukraine combat tuberculosis.

    Connections. 2006 Jan; [2] p.

    In September 2005, the World Health Organization (WHO) awarded Ukraine a 2.5 million dollar grant to combat the country's growing tuberculosis epidemic, according to Mykola Polischuk, who was Minister of Health at the time the grant was awarded. This funding will provide for the purchase of high-quality medications and allow for the cost-effective treatment of 75,000 patients over three years beginning in January 2006. The new treatment program will employ the DOTS (Directly Observed Therapy-Short Course) strategy, which has been recognized as the world's best strategy for fighting TB largely due to its reliance on cheaper microbiological methods of diagnosis rather than X-rays. Patients are first identified using microscopy services then prescribed the correct dosage of anti-TB medicines for a period of six to eight months. If administered accurately, DOTS can successfully treat TB in 99 percent of cases. Ukrainian President Viktor Yushchenko echoed WHO's decision to increase TB funding in October when he pledged to increase health funding, restore the country's failing health system, and fight the spread of HIV and tuberculosis, according to the Associated Press. (excerpt)
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  22. 22
    296325
    Peer Reviewed

    Global Fund suspends grants to Burma.

    Ahmad K

    Lancet Infectious Diseases. 2006 Jan; 6(1):14.

    Burma's Health Minister Kyaw Myint has sharply criticised a decision by the Global Fund To Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria to cancel grants worth US$98.4 million it approved in Nov 2004 and Jan 2005 to combat the three diseases in the country over the next 5 years. "Temporary restrictions on travel, that since have been relaxed, were not adequate reasons to cancel the grants", Myint said. He complained that the Global Fund did not warn his country of its intended action and warned that the termination would affect millions of people suffering from or at risk of HIV/AIDS, tuberculosis, and malaria in the country. Peter Newsum of CARE Myanmar believes the Fund's decision to cancel the grants will have a major impact on the work of organisations involved in combating the diseases in the country. (excerpt)
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  23. 23
    293192
    Peer Reviewed

    The World Health Organization and the transition from "international" to "global" public health.

    Brown TM; Cueto M; Fee E

    American Journal of Public Health. 2006 Jan; 96(1):62-72.

    The term "global health" is rapidly replacing the older terminology of "international health." We describe the role of the World Health Organization (WHO) in both international and global health and in the transition from one to the other. We suggest that the term "global health" emerged as part of larger political and historical processes, in which WHO found its dominant role challenged and began to reposition itself within a shifting set of power alliances. Between 1948 and 1998, WHO moved from being the unquestioned leader of international health to being an organization in crisis, facing budget shortfalls and diminished status, especially given the growing influence of new and powerful players. We argue that WHO began to refashion itself as the coordinator, strategic planner, and leader of global health initiatives as a strategy of survival in response to this transformed international political context. (author's)
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  24. 24
    186807

    International assistance to women's organizations. [Ayuda internacional a las organizaciones femeninas]

    Kumar K

    In: Women and civil war. Impact, organizations, and action, edited by Krishna Kumar. Boulder, Colorado, Lynne Rienner Publishers, 2001. 205-214.

    Several factors have led the international donor community to support women's organizations both during and after conflict. One obvious factor is that because of lack of resources, shortage of skilled personnel, and general decline in the morale of the staff, public bureaucracies become extremely fragile in war-torn societies. They are often unable to provide urgently needed social services to the suffering populace. Therefore, the international community tends to develop partnerships with voluntary organizations, including women's organizations, to provide essential assistance to the needy people. There are two additional reasons for the international donor community to support women's organizations. First, by virtue of their leadership and commitment, these organizations are better able to reach women than are male-dominated or mixed civil-society organizations. Their staff members can easily empathize with the intended women beneficiaries, who in turn feel more at ease in sharing their problems with them. Second, the international community also sees in women's organizations potential for empowering women. In addition to channeling assistance, they contribute to the social and psychological empowerment of women by teaching self-reliance and leadership skills. (excerpt)
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  25. 25
    187530
    Peer Reviewed

    FIGO and women's health 2000 - 2003.

    Sheth SS

    International Journal of Gynecology and Obstetrics. 2003 Sep; 82(3):357-367.

    The International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics – FIGO – has been striving hard to carefully attend to women’s well-being, and respect and implement their rights, the status and their health, which is well beyond the basic obstetric and gynecological requirement. FIGO is deeply involved in acting as a catalyst for the all-round activities of national obstetric and gynecologic societies to mobilise their members to participate in and contribute to, all of their endeavours. FIGO’s committees strengthen these objectives and FIGO’s alliance with WHO provides a springboard. The task is gigantic, but FIGO, through national obstetric and gynecological societies and with the strength of obstetricians and gynecologists as its battalion, can offer to combat and meet the demands. (author's)
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