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  1. 1
    297229

    Adapted for use in former Soviet countries, WHO/US government PMTCT protocols are introduced in three Russian cities.

    Connections. 2005 Aug-Sep; [3] p..

    HIV/AIDS is called a women's disease in African countries because almost 60 percent of the people infected with the virus are women. This comparison may soon also be relevant for Russia where the relative share of women among people with HIV is rising steadily. In some regions it is already in excess of 40 percent. Russian experts attribute this situation to the development of the commercial sex trade, as well as to a rising rate of transmission through sexual contact with drug users. The gravest situation is the escalating incidence of HIV/AIDS among women of childbearing age, especially those between 15 and 30. More and more cases of the disease are being reported in this group. Many of them are diagnosed during pregnancy, which translates to a corresponding increase the number of HIV-infected children in Russia. At the start of 2005, approximately 10,000 such children had been registered, whereas in 1996 there were only 18 of them. While it is practically impossible to prevent the spread of HIV/AIDS among adults, mother-to-child transmission of the virus can be controlled. The question, "How?" is complex and multifaceted. It was discussed in detail by participants in a series of workshops sponsored by UNICEF and AIHA in three Russian cities-- Magnitogorsk, Orenburg, and Chelyabinsk--between May and August this year. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    191913
    Peer Reviewed

    China to offer free HIV testing and treatment.

    Koralage N

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2004 Apr 24; 328(7446):[2] p..

    The Chinese government is to offer free HIV tests and treatments to those who cannot afford to pay. The policy includes free antiretroviral drugs, testing, prevention of mother to child transmission, and schooling of orphans. Joel Rehnstrom, country coordinator of UNAIDS China, said he was “very encouraged by the commitment of central government in China to provide free testing and treatment.” He added, however, that there would no doubt be setbacks: “I believe it will be an enormous challenge to provide free testing and treatment across China. My sense is that every country in the world should probably have woken up earlier to HIV/AIDS. China is no exception.” UNAIDS (the Joint United Nations Programme on HIV/AIDS) has been involved with the scheme, including the development of guidelines for testing, voluntary counselling, and antiretroviral treatment. According to the state controlled Chinese media, the central government will fund the scheme in areas with a high prevalence of HIV—for example, Yunnan and Sichuan in the south west. Areas not covered by central government will be funded by local governments. (excerpt)
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