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Your search found 88 Results

  1. 1
    374438

    Bangladesh. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Bangladesh

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB, the IPPF Member Association in Bangladesh) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. The government has made some progress towards its pledges, but existing efforts are not enough to deliver on its promises by 2020. In addition, other problems and gaps have emerged. The government must address these problems urgently. Civil society calls on the government to: Increase the budgetary allocation to family planning and reduce the resource gap for family planning by 50% by 2021. The government pledged US $40 million per year (or US $380 million by 2021), but since 2009, increases to the annual development budget have not met this commitment; Expand access to long-acting and reversible contraception (LARC) in order to ensure that vulnerable groups have access and choice of family planning methods; Empower women and girls to make family planning choices and freely exercise their sexual and reproductive rights.
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  2. 2
    374437

    Zimbabwe. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Zimbabwe. National Family Planning Council

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC, the IPPF Collaborating Partner in Zimbabwe) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Facilitate the active participation of girls and young women, including those who are marginalized and those living with HIV, in all aspects of national programming and decision-making relating to HIV and AIDS; Strengthen commitment to women’s health by responding to the health impact of unsafe abortion, a major public health concern, by scaling up post-abortion care and reducing unintended pregnancies through expanded and improved family planning services; Implement evidence-based HIV prevention programmes that address the needs of girls and young women, especially those living in prison or detention centres, those involved in transactional sex or child marriages, survivors of gender-based violence and orphans.
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  3. 3
    374436

    Zambia. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ, the IPPF Member Association in Zambia) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Demonstrate that family planning is a top priority on its development agenda by allocating more resources towards family planning. Currently, there are a lot of competing priorities resulting in fewer resources for family planning. Increases to the family planning budget should be sustained in subsequent budgets and the government should consult with civil society to decide how these resources can be used most effectively; Create a dedicated budget line for family planning to ensure that resources are appropriately distributed and used for family planning. CSOs must be involved in the discussion to help formulate clear aims for family planning funding that are informed by their experiences in communities, with the people who need access to services; Allocate government staff and resources to engage with religious and traditional leaders and communities, particularly in the poorest and most under-served areas, to reduce socio-cultural barriers to family planning.
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  4. 4
    374435

    Pakistan. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Pakistan [FPAP]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    Rahnuma, Family Planning Association of Pakistan (Rahnuma-FPAP, the IPPF Member Association in Pakistan) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Demonstrate political commitment to deliver the FP2020 pledges. To date, there has been slow progress on all family planning indicators due to inadequate financial commitments and ownership by governments and government ministries; Allocate government funding to family planning at the provincial level. Budgets are a responsibility of provincial governments, due to devolution; Invest in effective procurement and logistics systems for family planning to ensure commodity security and address unmet need for family planning, including unmet need for long-acting reversible contraceptives. In the absence of a functioning supply chain, unmet need will increase.
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  5. 5
    374434

    Kenya. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Health Options Kenya [FHOK]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    Family Health Options Kenya (FHOK, the IPPF Member Association in Kenya), the Centre for the Study of Adolescence (CSA) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Respond to severe shortages of health workers and poor working conditions in the health sector; Recruit 17,000 health workers by 2017 and an additional 40,000 community health extension workers by 2017 (in accordance with promises made at the Human Resources for Health Conference in Brazil, 2013); Improve the procurement and supply of FP commodities. Currently, Kenya can access FP commodities for free, but only when they are ordered alone. The Kenya Medical Supplies Authority (KEMSA) often orders FP supplies with other essential supplies, and as a result the government has to pay for them, wasting valuable resources; Accelerate the training of trainers on new FP technologies to increase access to developments in family planning. New family planning technologies offer different benefits compared to modern family planning methods currently available. However, health workers must be trained to deliver them.
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  6. 6
    374433

    Indonesia. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Perkumpulan Keluarga Berencana Indonesia [PKBI]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Indonesian Planned Parenthood Association (PKBI/IPPA, the IPPF Member Association in Indonesia) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. The government has made some progress towards its pledges, but existing efforts are not enough to deliver on its promises by 2020. In addition, other problems and gaps have emerged. The government must address these problems urgently. Civil society calls on the government to: Create a dedicated budget line for family planning and increase budget allocations for family planning. Currently, only 2.2% of the health budget is allocated for nutrition and maternal health and family planning, which falls short of the US $263.7 million target pledged at the 2012 Family Planning Summit. Although the government increased the health budget by 1.5% from 2014-2015, it is not clear how much of the increase was allocated to family planning; Amend Population Law 52/2009 to state that family planning services must not discriminate on the basis of marital status. To implement this amendment, the government must issue new health service delivery guidelines and raise awareness of the policy change; Establish mechanisms to involve young people in government decision-making processes. Youth programmes, in particular, must take into account young people’s needs and demands in order to be effective.
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  7. 7
    374431

    India. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of India [FPAI]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Spotlight on Family Planning series offers a snapshot on progress governments have made in delivering on their FP2020 pledges, made at the London 2012 Family Planning Summit. The Family Planning Association of India (FPA India), the IPPF Member Association in India) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods.
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  8. 8
    374432

    Philippines. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Organization of the Philippines [FPOP]

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Family Planning Organization of the Philippines (FPOP, the IPPF Member Association in the Philippines) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning methods. Civil society calls on the government to: Improve implementation of the Reproductive Health Law by issuing clear guidance to government agencies and local government units with regards to what their duties and responsibilities are in relation to the RH Law; Implement behaviour change programmes for bureaucrats, health workers and civil servants so they clearly understand their responsibilities with regards to the RH Law, and to eliminate any possibility that they will misinterpret the Law.
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  9. 9
    374430

    Zambia: holding government to account for FP2020 commitments.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Africa Region

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015 Sep. 2 p.

    To hold the government to account for its FP2020 commitments, the Planned Parenthood Association of Zambia (PPAZ) developed a monitoring and accountability tool, called the FP annual score card, in collaboration with local partners. The score card measures the government’s annual performance against their commitments, using indicators such as ‘demand generated for FP’, ‘financing’ and ‘access to services’. The score card helps advocates to identify what the government has delivered to date and what it should be delivering, based on a trajectory towards 2020. Family planning organizations and champions, national and international, use the results in their advocacy messaging and monitoring.
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  10. 10
    337633

    Family planning in El Salvador: the achievements of 50 years.

    Santiso-Galvez R; Ward VM; Bertrand JT

    Chapel Hill, North Carolina, University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Carolina Population Center, MEASURE Evaluation, 2015 Apr. [22] p. (SR-15-118C; USAID Cooperative Agreement No. AID-OAA-L-14-00004)

    This publication is one of eight case studies that were developed as part of a broader review entitled Family Planning in Latin America and the Caribbean: The Achievements of 50 Years. As its title implies, the larger review documents and analyzes the accomplishments in the entire region since the initiation of U.S. Agency for International Development (USAID) funding in the early 1960s. El Salvador has made enormous progress in terms of family planning over the past five decades. It has reduced fertility rates; it has developed a robust legal and regulatory framework for FP; it has allocated resources for procuring contraceptives for its population; it now offers information and contraceptive services to the entire population of the country with the active participation of civil society organizations, especially women’s organizations.
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  11. 11
    071962

    Norway.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 222-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Norway's 1985 population of 4,142,000 is projected to grow to 4,261,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 20.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 21.1% were over the age of 60. 16.9% and 27.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 1.8 to -0.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.0 to 78.1 years, the crude death rate will increase from 10.7 to 12.2, while,e infant mortality will decline from 8.0 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.5 to 11.4. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 71.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.0 years. Urban population will increase from 72.8% in 1985 to 79.9% overall by the year 2025. All of these levels and trends are considered acceptable by the government. Norway does not have an explicit population policy. A population committee was, however, created in 1981 to consider population and development, especially in the face of ongoing demographic aging. The government works to provide health for the population, maintain the level of immigration, and improve women's status. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  12. 12
    071961

    Nigeria.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 218-21. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Nigeria's 1985 population of 95,198,000 is projected to grow to 338,105,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 48.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.0% were over the age of 60. 38.8% and 4.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 33.3 to 22.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 48.5 to 64.5 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 17.1 to 6.8, while infant mortality will decline from 114.2 to 48.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 7.1 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 50.4 to 29.5. The 1981/2 contraceptive prevalence rate was 5.0, while the 1981/2 female mean age at 1st marriage was 18.7 years. Urban population will increase from 23.0% in 1985 to 53.0% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Nigeria has an explicit population policy. It aims to reduce population growth, fertility, morbidity, mortality, and the rate of urbanization. Specific efforts to effect these changes include providing for family planning and maternal-child health, education, rural and urban development, enhanced women's status, and greater male responsibility. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  13. 13
    071959

    Nicaragua.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 210-3. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Nicaragua's 1985 population of 3,272,000 is projected to grow to 9,219,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 46.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.1% were over the age of 60. 31.1% and 7.8% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 34.5 to 17.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 59.8 to 72.6 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 9.7 to 5.1, while infant mortality will decline from 76.4 to 26.9. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.9 to 2.7, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 44.2 to 22.9. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 27.0, while the 1971 female mean age at 1st marriage was 20.2 years. Urban population will increase from 56.6% in 1985 to 77.9% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, fertility, and immigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, high emigration, and spatial distribution are not. Nicaragua does not have a explicit population policy. The government finds the country to be underpopulated, and therefore concentrates upon reducing morbidity, mortality, and urban migration, and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  14. 14
    071958

    New Zealand.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 206-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    New Zealand's 1985 population of 3,318,000 is projected to grow to 4,202,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 24.1% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 14.6% were over the age of 60. 17.9% and 23.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 7.4 to 1.8 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.8 to 77.5 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.4 to 10.2, while infant mortality will decline from 12.1 to 6.1. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 1.9 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 15.7 to 11.9. The 1976 contraceptive prevalence rate was 41.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.7 years. Urban population will increase from 83.7% in 1985 to 87.8% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high emigration is not. New Zealand does not have an explicit population policy. Demographic variables have, however, been influenced by policies toward the family, health care, and immigration. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  15. 15
    071957

    Netherlands.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 202-5. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Netherlands' 1985 population of 14,500,000 is projected to grow to 14,691,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.6% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 16.5% were over the age of 60. 15.1% and 30.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.8 to -2.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 76.0 to 78.2 years, the crude death rate will increase from 8.7 to 13.0, while infant mortality will decline from 8.3 to 5.2. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.6 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 12.5 to 10.4. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 72.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.2 years. Urban population will increase from 88.4% in 1985 to 89.6% overall by the year 2025. Population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while high immigration and low emigration are not. The Netherlands has an explicit population policy. Fertility should be 15-30% below replacement level over several years in order to stop population growth, the level of immigration should be restricted, and a stationary population should ultimately be smaller than that presently realized. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  16. 16
    071956

    Nepal.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 198-201. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Nepal's 1985 population of 16,482,000 is projected to grow to 33,946,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 43.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.0% were over the age of 60. 28.6% and 7.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 23.3 to 11.7 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 45.9 to 61.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 18.4 to 9.0, while infant mortality will decline from 138.7 to 61.4. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.3 to 2.5, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 41.7 to 20.6. The 1986 contraceptive prevalence rate was 15.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.1 years. Urban population will increase from 7.7% in 1985 to 30.6% overall by the year 2025. Significant emigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration. and spatial distribution are not. Nepal has an explicit population policy. Intervening both directly and indirectly, policy strives to control population growth through general development, sociocultural, economic, and environmental reform, and maternal-child health and family planning programs. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  17. 17
    071953

    Morocco.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 186-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Morocco's 1985 population of 21,941,000 is projected to grow to 40,062,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 41.0% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.7% were over the age of 60. 23.3% and 12.2% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.1 to 10.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 58.3 to 72.8 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 11.3 to 6.4, while infant mortality will decline from 96.5 to 23.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 5.1 to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 36.4 to 16.7. The 1983/4 contraceptive prevalence rate was 26.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 22.3 years. Urban population will increase form 44.8% in 1985 to 71.0% overall by the year 2025. Insignificant immigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, spatial distribution, and low emigration are not. Morocco does not have an explicit population policy. Other policies of intervention are, however, in place to lower population growth and fertility, adjust spatial distribution, and reduce infant mortality. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  18. 18
    071890

    Germany, Federal Republic of.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 14-7. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    The Federal Republic of Germany's 1985 population of 60,877,000 is projected to shrink to 53,490,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 15.4% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 20.0% were over the age of 60. 16.0% and 31.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from -0.2 to -0.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.7 to 77.33 years, the crude death rate will increase from 12.3 to 15.4, while infant mortality will decline from 10.6 to 5.5. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.4 to 2.0, with a corresponding increase in the crude birth rate from 10.1 to 11.1. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 77.9, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.6 years. Urban population will increase from 85.5% in 1985 to 88.6% overall by they year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, and immigration are not. The Republic does not have an explicit population policy. A pro-natalist program launched, however, in 1984 to encourage an additional 200,000 births/year. The government hopes to realize steady population growth, improve the situation of families, provide for individuals' health, and improve spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  19. 19
    071888

    Gambia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume II. Gabon to Norway, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1989. 6-9. (Population Studies No. 102/Add.1; ST/ESA/SER.A/102/Add.1)

    Gambia's 1985 population off 643,000 is projected to grow to 1,494,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 42.5% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.0% were over the age of 60. 36.4% and 5.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 19.4 to 15.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 35.0 to 51.0 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 29.0 to 13.8, while infant mortality will decline from 174.1 to 93.8. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.4 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 48.4 to 29.3. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 1.0. Urban population will increase from 20.1% in 1985 to 48.4% overall by the year 2025. Emigration is considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, immigration, and spatial distribution are not. Gambia has an explicit population policy. It aims to directly intervene to reduce population growth by lowering fertility, mortality, immigration, and rural-urban migration. Measures will include a combined approach of family planning and maternal-child health services, rural development, and employment programs. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  20. 20
    071886

    France.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 218-21. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    France's 1985 population of 54,621,000 is projected to grow to 58,431,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 21.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.7% were over the age of 60. 17.8% and 25.9% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.4 to 0.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 74.5 to 77.6 years, the crude death rate will increase from 11.2 to 11.8, while infant mortality will decline from 9.2 to 5.2. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.9 to 2.0, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 14.5 to 12.1. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 79.0, while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.3 years. Urban population will increase from 73.4% in 1985 to 77.3% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, and immigration are not. France has an explicit population policy. Concerned over the low growth rate of the native-born population, policy aims to increase fertility an population growth by improving the socioeconomic status of families, lowering the mortality rate, and restricting most types of immigration. Population policy as it related to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  21. 21
    071885

    Finland.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 214-7. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Finland's 1985 population of 4,891,000 is projected to grow to 4,994,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 19.3% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 17.2% were over the age of 60. 16.5% and 28.0% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 3.4 to -2.4 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 73.8 to 77.3 years, the crude death rate will increase from 9.9 to 13.3, while infant mortality will decline from 6.2 to 5.0. The fertility rate will rise over the period from 1.7 to 1.8, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 13.3 to 10.9. The 1977 contraceptive prevalence rate was 80.0, while the 1980 female mean age at 1st marriage was 24.6 years. Urban population will increase from 64.0% in 1985 to 83.5% overall by the year 2025. All of these trends and indicators are considered to be acceptable by the government. Comparatively high morbidity and mortality among males, however, is of concern. Causes for such excess mortality include cardiovascular diseases, cancer, accidents, and suicide. Finland does not have an explicit population policy. Attention is presently directed toward morbidity and mortality, promoting and supporting the family, and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  22. 22
    071884

    Fiji.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 210-3. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Fiji's 1985 population of 691,000 is projected to grow to 953,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 37.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 5.5% were over the age of 60. 20.8% and 17.1% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 25.7 to 6.1 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 68.9 to 76.1 years, the crude death rate will increase from 5.4 to 7.3, while infant mortality will decline from 30.8 to 10.5. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 3.5 to 1.9, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 31.1 to 13.4. The 1974 contraceptive prevalence rate was 41.0, while the 1976 female mean age at 1st marriage was 21.6 years. Urban population will increase from 41.2% in 1985 to 67.4% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Fiji does not have an explicit population policy. The government does, however, have the intention to enact measures to control population growth and fertility. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  23. 23
    071883

    Ethiopia.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 206-9. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Ethiopia's 1985 population of 43,557,000 is projected to grown to 122,285,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 44.8% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 4.4% were over the age of 60. 37.6% and 5.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 26.5 to 18.9 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 40.9 to 55.9 years, the crude death rate will decrease from 23.2 to 11.0, while infant mortality will decline from 154.9 to 81.5. the fertility rate will decline over the period from 6.7 to 3.6, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 49.7 to 29.9. The 1981 contraceptive prevalence rate was 2.0, while the 1981 female mean age at 1st marriage was 17.7 years. Urban population will increase from 11.6% in 1985 or 33.8% overall by the year 2025. Immigration and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while population growth, morbidity, mortality, fertility, and spatial distribution are not. Ethiopia does not have an explicit population policy. Government policy instead focuses upon improving health and adjusting spatial distribution. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measured taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  24. 24
    071863

    China.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 126-9. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    China's 1985 population of 1,059,521,000 is projected to grown to 1,475,159,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 29.7% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 8.2% were over the age of 60. 19.5% and 19.3% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 12.3 to 5.3 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 67.8 to 75.7 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.7 to 8.7, while infant mortality will decline from 39.3 to 11.4. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.4 to 2.1, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 19.0 to 24.0. The 1985 contraceptive prevalence rate was 74.0 while the 1982 female mean age at 1st marriages was 22.4 years. Urban population will increase from 20.6% in 1985 to 43.6% overall by the year 2025. Immigration, emigration, and spatial distribution are considered to be acceptable by the government, while morbidity, mortality, and too high population growth, and fertility are not. China has an explicit population policy. Controlling population growth is a major government objective. Family planning, population education, socioeconomic development are stressed with particular attention to limiting fertility while ensuring health births. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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  25. 25
    071862

    Chile.

    United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    In: World population policies. Volume I. Afghanistan to France, [compiled by] United Nations. Department of International Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division. New York, New York, United Nations, 1987. 122-5. (Population Studies No. 102; ST/ESA/SER.A/102)

    Chile's 1985 population of 12,038,000 is projected to grow to 18,301,000 by the year 2025. In 1985, 30.2% of the population was aged 0-14 years, while 8.3% were over the age of 60. 22.4% and 17.6% are projected to be in these respective age groups by the year 2025. The rate of natural increase will have declined from 16.0 to 6.6 over the period. Life expectancy should increase from 69.7 to 74.1 years, the crude death rate will increase from 6.7 to 8.9, while infant mortality will decline from 23.2 to 14.4. The fertility rate will decline over the period from 2.6l to 2.2, with a corresponding drop in the crude birth rate from 22.7 to 15.5. The 1978 contraceptive prevalence rate was 43.0, while the 1970 female mean age at 1st marriage was 23.3 years. Urban population will increase from 83.6% in 1985 to 92.7% overall by the year 2025. Morbidity, mortality, immigration, and emigration are considered to be acceptable by the government, while spatial distribution and too low population growth and fertility are not. Chile has an explicit population policy. The government aims to increase population size and growth by reducing mortality and modifying fertility. There will not, however, be any direct, official intervention to effect desired changes in fertility. Further steps will be taken to modify spatial distribution in the country. Population policy as it relates to development objectives is discussed, followed by consideration of specific policies adopted and measures taken to address above-mentioned problematic demographic indicators. The status of women and population data systems are also explored.
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