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  1. 1
    374072

    From the first hour of life: making the case for improved infant and young child feeding everywhere.

    UNICEF. Division of Data Research and Policy. Data and Analytics Section; UNICEF. Programme Division. Nutrition Section

    2016 Oct; New York, New York, UNICEF, 2016 Oct. 104 p.

    Food and feeding practices from birth to age 2 have a profound impact on the rest of a child’s life. Good nutrition helps children exercise their rights to grow, learn, develop, participate and become productive members of their communities. This report provides a global status update on infant and young child feeding practices, and puts forth recommendations for improving them.
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  2. 2
    307982
    Peer Reviewed

    Working on the impossible: early childhood policies in Namibia.

    Penn H

    Childhood. 2008 Aug; 15(3):379-395.

    This article discusses the complexities of aid-giving using the example of early childhood policies in Namibia. It supports a critical view of aid processes and of World Bank endeavours in particular. Using an analysis of the World Bank funded education sector-wide improvement plan (ETSIP) in Namibia and three Namibian local case studies, it shows how the local circumstances of young children and their parents are ignored in order to fit in with donor preconceptions, and how senior officials come to adopt those views. It argues that universally derived policies on early childhood development are misapplied, and poverty and inequality are ignored in the search for technocratic solutions. (author's)
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  3. 3
    083321

    GMP programs in Ecuador.

    Medina M

    In: Growth Promotion for Child Development. Proceedings of a colloquium held in Nyeri, Kenya, 12-13 May 1992, edited by J. Cervinskas, N.M. Gerein, and Sabu George. Ottawa, Canada, International Development Research Centre [IDRC], 1993 Feb. 208-13.

    Growth monitoring programs have been in place in Ecuador since the mid-1960s. UNICEF evaluated growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) programs in the country over the period November 1990 to March 1991 to review current GMP efforts and assess how they are affecting triple-a processes. This paper concentrates on the analysis of both community-based and clinic-based programs and lessons learned. The Ministry of Health Growth Monitoring and Development program is implemented nationally through the network of government health units, while other GMP programs are based in the community and implemented by different types of institutions and nongovernmental organizations (NGO). The study was conducted in 6 different areas of the country in which 3 communities each were selected. A total 810 mothers were surveyed, 18 GMP sessions observed, 18 focus group discussions held with mothers, and 37 in-depth interviews conducted with 37 nurse aides and promoters and 7 national officials. It may be concluded that the probability of program success increases in an institutional context which is supportive of community participation and enhancing the active involvement of mothers to make GMP successful; different approaches to implementing GMP activities have implications in terms of adequate coverage; every effort should be made to reach those most at risk; better ways of communicating with mothers should be developed; sharing experiences through joint exercises between the government health units and NGO projects will contribute to a better quality of program implementation; and the possibility of linking the weighing activities with income generation has been a significant contribution toward program success.
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