Your search found 1231 Results

  1. 1
    375992

    Engaging young people for health and sustainable development. Strategic opportunities for the World Health Organization and partners.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018. 72 p. (WHO/CDS/TB/2018.22)

    This report builds on WHO’s long-standing work on young people’s health and rights, including the Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health (2016-2030), the Global Accelerated Action for the Health of Adolescents (AA-HA!) guidance, and contribution to the new UN Youth Strategy. It was developed as part of the roadmap towards the development of a WHO strategy for engaging young people and young professionals. The world today has the largest generation of young people in history with 1.8 billion between the ages of 10 and 24 years. Many of them already are driving transformative change, and many more are poised to do so, but lack the opportunity and means. This cohort represents a powerhouse of human potential that could transform health and sustainable development. A priority is to ensure that no young person is left behind and all can realize their right to health equitably and without discrimination or hindrance. This force for change represents an unparalleled opportunity for the WHO and partners to transform the way they engage with young people, including to achieve the 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development. This report describes strategic opportunities to meaningfully engage young people in transforming health and sustainable development. This will mean providing opportunities for young people’s leadership and for their engagement with national, regional and global programmes.
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  2. 2
    375990

    Private sector: Who is accountable? for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. 2018 report. Summary of recommendations.

    Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2018. 12 p.

    This report presents five recommendations, which are addressed to governments, parliaments, the judiciary, the United Nations (UN) system, the UN Global Compact, the Every Woman Every Child (EWEC) partners, donors, civil society and the private sector itself. Recommendations include: 1) Access to services and the right to health. To achieve universal access to services and protect the health and related rights of women, children and adolescents, governments should regulate private as well as public sector providers. Parliaments should strengthen legislation and ensure oversight for its enforcement. The UHC2030 partnership should drive political leadership at the highest level to address private sector transparency and accountability. 2) The pharmaceutical industry and equitable access to medicines. To ensure equitable, affordable access to quality essential medicines and related health products for all women, children and adolescents, governments and parliaments should strengthen policies and regulation governing the pharmaceutical industry. 3) The food industry, obesity and NCDs. To tackle rising obesity and NCDs among women, children and adolescents, governments and parliaments should regulate the food and beverage industry, and adopt a binding global convention. Ministries of education and health should educate students and the public at large about diet and exercise, and set standards in school-based programmes. Related commitments should be included in the next G20 Summit agenda. 4) The UN Global Compact and the EWEC partners. The UN Global Compact and the EWEC partners should strengthen their monitoring and accountability standards for engagement of the business sector, with an emphasis on women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. They should advocate for accountability of the for-profit sector to be put on the global agenda for achieving UHC and the SDGs, including at the 2019 High-Level Political Forum on Sustainable Development and the Health Summit. The UN H6 Partnership entities and the GFF should raise accountability standards in the country programmes they support. 5) Donors and business engagement in the SDGs. Development cooperation partners should ensure that transparency and accountability standards aligned with public health are applied throughout their engagement with the for-profit sector. They should invest in national regulatory and oversight capacities, and also regulate private sector actors headquartered in their countries.
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  3. 3
    375989

    Private sector: who is accountable? for women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health. 2018 report.

    Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2018. 80 p.

    In line with the mandate from the UN Secretary-General, every year the IAP issues a report that provides an independent snapshot of progress on delivering promises to the world’s women, children and adolescents for their health and well-being. Recommendations are included on ways to help fast-track action to achieve the Global Strategy for Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health 2016-2030 and the Sustainable Development Goals - from the specific lens of accountability, of who is responsible for delivering on promises, to whom, and how. The theme of the IAP’s 2018 report is accountability of the private sector. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development will not be achieved without the active and meaningful involvement of the private sector. Can the private sector be held accountable for protecting women’s, children’s and adolescents’ health? And if so, who is responsible for holding them to account, and what are the mechanisms for doing so? This report looks at three key areas of private sector engagement: health service delivery the pharmaceutical industry and access to medicines the food industry and its significant influence on health and nutrition, with a focus NCDs and rising obesity.
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  4. 4
    394406
    Peer Reviewed

    A New World Health Era.

    Pablos-Mendez A; Raviglione MC

    Global Health, Science and Practice. 2018 Mar 21; 6(1):8-16.

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  5. 5
    372636

    Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018: From World Development Indicators.

    World Bank

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 2018. 91 p.

    he Atlas of Sustainable Development Goals 2018 is a visual guide to the trends, challenges and measurement issues related to each of the 17 Sustainable Development Goals. The Atlas features maps and data visualizations, primarily drawn from World Development Indicators (WDI) - the World Bank’s compilation of internationally comparable statistics about global development and the quality of people’s lives. Given the breadth and scope of the SDGs, the editors have been selective, emphasizing issues considered important by experts in the World Bank’s Global Practices and Cross Cutting Solution Areas. Nevertheless, The Atlas aims to reflect the breadth of the Goals themselves and presents national and regional trends and snapshots of progress towards the UN’s seventeen Sustainable Development Goals related to: poverty, hunger, health, education, gender, water, energy, jobs, infrastructure, inequalities, cities, consumption, climate, oceans, the environment, peace, institutions, and partnerships.
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  6. 6
    375903

    World health statistics 2018: monitoring health for the SDGs, sustainable development goals.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2018. 100 p.

    The World Health Statistics series is WHO’s annual snapshot of the state of the world’s health. This 2018 edition contains the latest available data for 36 health-related Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) indicators. It also links to the three SDG-aligned strategic priorities of the WHO’s 13th General Programme of Work: achieving universal health coverage, addressing health emergencies and promoting healthier populations.
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  7. 7
    392520
    Peer Reviewed

    A Decade of Monitoring HIV Epidemics in Nigeria: Positioning for Post-2015 Agenda.

    Akinwande O; Bashorun A; Azeez A; Agbo F; Dakum P; Abimiku A; Bilali C; Idoko J; Ogungbemi K

    AIDS and Behavior. 2017 Jul; 21(Suppl 1):62-71.

    BACKGROUND: Nigeria accounts for 9% of the global HIV burden and is a signatory to Millennium Development Goals as well as the post-2015 Sustainable Development Goals. This paper reviews maturation of her HIV M&E system and preparedness for monitoring of the post-2015 agenda. METHODS: Using the UNAIDS criteria for assessing a functional M&E system, a mixed-methods approach of desk review and expert consultations, was employed. RESULTS: Following adoption of a multi-sectoral M&E system, Nigeria experienced improved HIV coordination at the National and State levels, capacity building for epidemic appraisals, spectrum estimation and routine data quality assessments. National data and systems audit processes were instituted which informed harmonization of tools and indicators. The M&E achievements of the HIV response enhanced performance of the National Health Management Information System (NHMIS) using DHIS2 platform following its re-introduction by the Federal Ministry of Health, and also enabled decentralization of data management to the periphery. CONCLUSION: A decade of implementing National HIV M&E framework in Nigeria and the recent adoption of the DHIS2 provides a strong base for monitoring the Post 2015 agenda. There is however a need to strengthen inter-sectoral data linkages and reduce the rising burden of data collection at the global level.
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  8. 8
    375796

    World malaria report 2017.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 196 p.

    The World malaria report, published annually, provides a comprehensive update on global and regional malaria data and trends. The latest report, released on 29 November 2017, tracks investments in malaria programmes and research as well as progress across all intervention areas: prevention, diagnosis, treatment and surveillance. It also includes dedicated chapters on malaria elimination and on key threats in the fight against malaria. The report is based on information received from national malaria control programmes and other partners in endemic countries; most of the data presented is from 2016.
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  9. 9
    379400
    Peer Reviewed

    National responses to global health targets: exploring policy transfer in the context of the UNAIDS '90-90-90' treatment targets in Ghana and Uganda.

    McRobie E; Matovu F; Nanyiti A; Nonvignon J; Abankwah DNY; Case KK; Hallett TB; Hanefeld J; Conteh L

    Health Policy and Planning. 2018 Jan 1; 33(1):17-33.

    Global health organizations frequently set disease-specific targets with the goal of eliciting adoption at the national-level; consideration of the influence of target setting on national policies, program and health budgets is of benefit to those setting targets and those intended to respond. In 2014, the Joint United Nations Program on HIV/AIDS set ‘ambitious’ treatment targets for country adoption: 90% of HIV-positive persons should know their status; 90% of those on treatment; 90% of those achieving viral suppression. Using case studies from Ghana and Uganda, we explore how the target and its associated policy content have been adopted at the national level. That is whether adoption is in rhetoric only or supported by program, policy or budgetary changes. We review 23 (14 from Ghana, 9 from Uganda) national policy, operational and strategic documents for the HIV response and assess commitments to ‘90-90-90’. In-person semi-structured interviews were conducted with purposively sampled key informants (17 in Ghana, 20 in Uganda) involved in program-planning and resource allocation within HIV to gain insight into factors facilitating adoption of 90-90-90. Interviews were transcribed and analyzed thematically, inductively and deductively, guided by pre-existing policy theories, including Dolowitz and Marsh’s policy transfer framework to describe features of the transfer and the Global Health Advocacy and Policy Project framework to explain observations. Regardless of notable resource constraints, transfer of the 90-90-90 targets was evident beyond rhetoric with substantial shifts in policy and programme activities. In both countries, there was evidence of attempts to minimize resource constraints by seeking programme efficiencies, prioritization of program activities and devising domestic financing mechanisms; however, significant resource gaps persist. An effective health network, comprised of global and local actors, mediated the adoption and adaptation, facilitating a shift in the HIV program from ‘business as usual’ to approaches targeting geographies and populations.
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  10. 10
    375764

    Global guidance on criteria and processes for validation: Elimination of mother-to-child transmission of HIV and syphilis. Second edition.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland,WHO, 2017. 52 p.

    This second edition of the EMTCT global validation guidance document provides standardized processes and consensus-developed criteria to validate EMTCT of HIV and syphilis, and to recognize high-HIV burden countries that have made significant progress on the path to elimination. The guidance places strong emphasis on country-led accountability, rigorous analysis, intensive programme assessment and multilevel collaboration, including the involvement of communities of women living with HIV. It provides guidance to evaluate the country’s EMTCT programme, the quality and accuracy of its laboratory and data collection mechanisms, as well as its efforts to uphold human rights and equality of women living with HIV, and their involvement in decision-making processes.
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  11. 11
    374700

    Safer women, safer world: a fund to increase the number of women UN Peacekeepers and better protect women and girls in conflict situations.

    Kenny C

    Washington, D.C., Center for Global Development, 2017 Jun. 4 p. (Center for Global Development Brief)

    Having more women peacekeepers is linked with large reductions in sexual misconduct by peacekeepers and more sustainable peace. The UN could potentially raise the proportion of women peacekeepers to 20 percent for around $75 million. A small multilateral trust fund would offer supplementary payments to troop-contributing countries for each woman peacekeeper provided.
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  12. 12
    323650

    Sexually transmitted infections: Implementing the Global STI Strategy.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 8 p. (Evidence-to-Action Brief; WHO/RHR/17.18)

    This policy brief is designed to help countries implement the Global STI Strategy. By taking action to build sustainable national and institutional capacity for addressing STIs, countries can ensure that key cost- effective interventions reach the greatest number of people in need.
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  13. 13
    323649

    Casting light on old shadows: Ending sexually transmitted infection epidemics as public health concerns by 2030.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 8 p. (Advocacy Brief; WHO/RHR/17.17)

    Countries can boost the response to STIs and improve the health of millions of women, men and adolescents by adopting WHO’s Global STI Strategy. Some viral STIs, like human papillomavirus (HPV) and HIV, are still incurable and can be deadly, while some bacterial STIs – like chlamydia, gonorrhoea, syphilis and trichomoniasis – are curable if detected and treated. This brief provide milestones and targets and five strategic directions for countries to develop their own national plans.
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  14. 14
    323583

    Report 2017: Transformative accountability for adolescents: Accountability for health and human rights of women, children and adolescents in the 2030 agenda.

    Independent Accountability Panel for Every Woman, Every Child, Every Adolescent (IAP)

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization, 2017. 64 p.

    Adolescents, who number 1.2 billion, or 1 in 6 of the global population, are the key for progress on the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). Every year, 1.2 million adolescents die, often from preventable causes—such as violence, suicide, pregnancy-related complications among girls, HIV/AIDS, road injuries and drowning, as well as diseases and respiratory infections. As the report states, however, high impact, cost effective solutions to improve adolescent health can yield huge benefits and billions in savings that can place them on better tracks for life, reaping demographic dividends. The Independent Accountability Panel (IAP), under its mandate by the UN Secretary-General to assess progress on the 2016-2030 Global Strategy on Women’s, Children’s and Adolescents’ Health in the context of the SDGs from the specific lens of who is accountable to whom, and for what, launched its 2017 report. The IAP’s six recommendations are to: 1) Leverage Accountability to Achieve the Global Strategy and the SDGs, 2) Make adolescents visible and measure what matters, 3) Foster whole-of-government accountability to adolescents, 4) Make universal health coverage work for adolescents, 5) Boost accountability for investments, including for adolescent health and well-being, and 6) Unleash the power of young people, by meaningfully engaging them in decision-making, and empowering them to seize the full potential of the digital age.
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  15. 15
    323525

    State of world population 2017. Worlds apart: Reproductive health and rights in an age of inequality.

    Diaz MM; Engelman R; Klugman J; Luchsinger G; Shaw E

    New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], Division of Communications and Strategic Partnerships, 2017. 140 p.

    In most developing countries, the poorest women have the fewest options for family planning, the least access to antenatal care and are most likely to give birth without the assistance of a doctor or midwife. Limited access to family planning translates into 89 million unintended pregnancies and 48 million abortions in developing countries annually. This does not only harm women’s health, but also restricts their ability to join or stay in the paid labour force and move towards financial independence, the report argues. Lack of access to related services, such as affordable child care, also stops women from seeking jobs outside the home. For women who are in the labour force, the absence of paid maternity leave and employers’ discrimination against those who become pregnant amount to a motherhood penalty, forcing many women to choose between a career and parenthood. The UNFPA report recommends focusing on the furthest behind first, in line with the United Nations blueprint for achieving sustainable development and inclusive societies by 2030. The 2030 Agenda for Sustainable Development has “envisaged a better future, one where we collectively tear down the barriers and correct disparities,” the report states. “Reducing all inequalities needs to be the aim. Some of the most powerful contributions can come from realizing...women’s reproductive rights.” (excerpt)
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  16. 16
    374612

    Making social protection gender-responsive: lessons from UN Women’s work in the Eastern Caribbean.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, [2017]. 4 p. (Policy Brief No. 7)

    There is broad-based agreement today that universal social protection systems are a desirable goal. For gender equality advocates, it is paramount to take advantage of this momentum to ensure that such systems benefit women by responding to their rights and needs. Well-designed social protection systems can narrow gender gaps in poverty rates, enhance women’s income security and access to personal income, and provide a lifeline for poor women, especially single mothers.1 The current context of economic stagnation and fiscal adjustment, however, places big constraints on the investments needed to achieve these goals. How can gender equality advocates engage with social protection advocacy in this context? This policy brief showcases the strategies that were used by UN Women’s Multi-Country Office in the Caribbean to promote gender-responsive social protection in a context where reforms have been driven mainly by efforts to reduce public debt and promote economic competitiveness.
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  17. 17
    374598

    Making innovation and technology work for women: UN Women’s work in innovation and technology.

    United Nations. UN Women

    New York, New York, UN Women, 2017 Sep. 22 p.

    This background paper highlights the key barriers that contribute towards creating and sustaining the gender gap in innovation and technology, including the limited market awarenss and investment in innovations that meet the needs of women; the gender-blind approach to innovation; the under-representation of women as innovators and entrepreneurs; and the perceived high risk, low reward profile of investing in innovations for women and girls. The paper also outlines the concrete action that UN Women and its partners are taking to address them.
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  18. 18
    374591

    The state of food security and nutrition in the world 2017: building resilience for peace and food security.

    Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations [FAO]; International Fund for Agricultural Development [IFAD]; UNICEF; United Nations. World Food Programme; World Health Organization [WHO]

    Rome, Italy, FAO, 2017. 133 p.

    This report has been jointly published by the Food and Agriculture Organization of the United Nations (FAO), the International Fund for Agricultural Development (IFAD), the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), the World Food Programme (WFP) and the World Health Organization (WHO). The 2017 edition marks the beginning of a new era in monitoring efforts to achieve a world without hunger and malnutrition within the framework of the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The report will henceforth monitor progress towards the targets on both ending hunger (SDG Target 2.1) and ending all forms of malnutrition (SDG Target 2.2). It will also include analyses of how food security and nutrition are related to progress on other SDG targets.
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  19. 19
    374590

    Early moments matter for every child.

    Britto PR

    New York, New York, UNICEF, 2017 Sep. 92 p.

    This report presents data and outlines best practices and policies that can put governments on the path to providing every child with the best start in life. It outlines the neuroscience of early childhood development (ECD), including the importance of nutrition, protection and stimulation in the early years. And it makes the case for scaling up investment, evaluation and monitoring in ECD programmes. The report concludes with a six-point call to action for governments and their partners to help maximize the potential of the children who will build the future – by making the most of the unparalleled opportunities offered by the early moments in life.
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  20. 20
    375726

    Accelerating change by the numbers. 2016 annual report of the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting: Accelerating change.

    UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 2017 Jul. 92 p.

    The 2016 Annual Report for the UNFPA-UNICEF Joint Programme on Female Genital Mutilation / Cutting provides two perspectives. This main document, "By the Numbers," analyses progress in quantitative terms, using the Results Framework as a basis. It provides an account of how the budget was allocated and offers profiles of each of the 17 programme countries (excepting Yemen). The profiles present facts on the national context, summarize key achievements, and share operational and financial information.
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  21. 21
    375634

    Progress on drinking water, sanitation and hygiene: 2017 update and SDG baselines.

    World Health Organization [WHO]; UNICEF

    Geneva, World Health Organization [WHO], 2017. 114 p.

    This report presents the first ever estimates of the population using ‘safely managed’ drinking water and sanitation services – meaning drinking water free from contamination that is available at home when needed, and toilets whereby excreta are treated and disposed of safely. It also documents progress towards ending open defecation and achieving universal access to basic services. The report identifies a number of critical data gaps that will need to be addressed in order to enable systematic monitoring of Sustainable Development Goal (SDG) targets and to realize the commitment to ‘leave no one behind’.
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  22. 22
    374450

    The global financing facility and family planning.

    Couture T

    Washington, D.C., PAI, 2016 Oct. 2 p.

    When the Global Financing Facility (GFF) was announced in 2014, it promised a “pioneering” way to finance and improve the lives of women, adolescents, children and newborns through provision of reproductive, maternal newborn and child health programs and policies. Family planning advocates and implementers were interested in the possibility of additional funds particularly as a global contraceptives funding crisis is looming, and the Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) are being operationalized. To date, the GFF has had three rounds of countries selected to receive funding. In the first round, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia, Kenya and Tanzania were selected. In the second round, Bangladesh, Cameroon, Liberia, Mozambique, Nigeria, Senegal and Uganda were selected. In the third round, Guatemala, Guinea, Myanmar and Sierra Leone were selected. To better understand the role of the GFF in filling funding gaps for family planning and contraceptive procurement, we analyzed the four published investment cases for Kenya, Tanzania, Ethiopia and Uganda.
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  23. 23
    375684

    MDGs to SDGs: Have we lost the plot?

    Kenny C

    [Washington, D.C.], Center for Global Development, 2015 May 27. 6 p. (Essays)

    In September this year, world leaders will meet in New York at the United Nations General Assembly. Top of the agenda will be the passage of a resolution laying out global development goals for the fifteen years to 2030, covering progress in areas from poverty reduction to forestry preservation. They will follow on from the Millennium Development Goals (MDGs), which have become a common yardstick of global progress over the past decade and a half. The MDGs, born out of the Millennium Declaration agreed to at the UN General Assembly in 2000, are widely seen as a considerable success of the international system. And they may well have played a role in speeding global progress toward better health and education outcomes over the last few years. That alone might justify coming up with a new set of global goals for the post-2015 period. But the power of the original MDGs to motivate was in their simplicity and clarity. Sadly, the process that has created proposals for the new set of goals has guaranteed the opposite outcome. The over wrought and obese drafts proposed by negotiating committees so far almost ensure that the post-2015 goals will have comparatively limited value and impact. While it is probably too late for the process to be rescued, particular post-2015 goals and targets might still be useful, and the broader hopes for sustainable development may well be salvaged by other UN meetings this year.
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  24. 24
    374440

    Taking ownership and driving progress: leading the global movement towards FP2020.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2014 Nov. 8 p.

    This publication outlines how, following the London Summit on Family Planning in 2012, International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) has worked to engage governments, with the aim of building a conducive environment to reach the most vulnerable groups, no matter how remote their location, in order to reach the key goal of ensuring 120 million more women have access to family planning by 2020.
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  25. 25
    374438

    Bangladesh. Spotlight on family planning: tracking progress on the FP2020 pledges.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]; Family Planning Association of Bangladesh

    [London, United Kingdom, IPPF, 2015]. 2 p.

    The Family Planning Association of Bangladesh (FPAB, the IPPF Member Association in Bangladesh) and other civil society organizations (CSOs) have identified a number of ‘high priority’ pledges: progress towards these pledges is critical for increasing access to modern family planning (FP) methods. The government has made some progress towards its pledges, but existing efforts are not enough to deliver on its promises by 2020. In addition, other problems and gaps have emerged. The government must address these problems urgently. Civil society calls on the government to: Increase the budgetary allocation to family planning and reduce the resource gap for family planning by 50% by 2021. The government pledged US $40 million per year (or US $380 million by 2021), but since 2009, increases to the annual development budget have not met this commitment; Expand access to long-acting and reversible contraception (LARC) in order to ensure that vulnerable groups have access and choice of family planning methods; Empower women and girls to make family planning choices and freely exercise their sexual and reproductive rights.
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