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  1. 1
    323425
    Peer Reviewed

    Estimating trends in the burden of malaria at country level.

    Cibulskis RE; Bell D; Christophel EM; Hii J; Delacollette C

    American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene. 2007; 77 Suppl 6:133-137.

    National disease burdens are often not estimated at all or are estimated using inaccurate methods, partly because the data sources for assessing disease burden-nationally representative household surveys, demographic surveillance sites, and routine health information systems-each have their limitations. An important step forward would be a more consistent quantification of the population at risk of malaria. This is most likely to be achieved by delimiting the geographical distribution of malaria transmission using routinely collected data on confirmed cases of disease. However, before routinely collected data can be used to assess trends in the incidence of clinical cases and deaths, the incompleteness of reporting and variation in the utilization of the health system must be taken into account. In the future, sentinel surveillance from public and private health facilities, selected according to risk stratification, combined with occasional household surveys and other population-based methods of surveillance, may provide better assessments of malaria trends. (author's)
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  2. 2
    306351
    Peer Reviewed

    The globalisation of cancer.

    Boyle P

    Lancet. 2006 Aug 19; 368(9536):629-630.

    The International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) was founded by a Resolution of the World Health Assembly in September, 1965. At that time, although data were sparse, cancer was widely considered to be a disease of developed high-resource countries. Now, the situation has changed dramatically with the majority of the global cancer burden found in low-resource and medium-resource countries. It is estimated that in 2000 almost 11 million new cases of cancer were diagnosed worldwide, 7 million people died from cancer, and 25 million persons were alive with cancer. The continued growth and ageing of the world's population will greatly affect the future cancer burden. By 2030, it could be expected that there will be 27 million incident cases of cancer, 17 million cancer deaths annually, and 75 million persons alive with cancer. The greatest effect of this increase will fall on low-resource and mediumresource countries where, in 2001, almost half of the disease burden was from non-communicable disease. (excerpt)
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