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  1. 1
    028826

    News from WHO's Diarrhoeal Diseases Control Programme.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Programme for Control of Diarrhoeal Diseases. Technical Advisory Group

    Who Chronicle. 1984; 38(5):212-6.

    This article highlights the conclusions and recommendations of the 5th meeting of the Technical Advisory Group of the World Health Organization (WHO) Diarrheal Diseases Control (CDD) Program held in March 1984. On the basis of clinical trials supported by the CDD Program, WHO has endorsed use of oral rehydration salts (ORS) containing trisodium citrate dihydrate in place of sodium bicarbonate. Although the bicarbonate formulation remains highly effective and may continue to be used, the citrate formula results in less stool output and is more stable under tropical climatic conditions. At its meeting, the Technical Advisory Group expressed satisfaction with progress in the health services and research components of the program's activities. By 1983, 72 countries or areas had formulated plans of operation for national CDD programs and 52 had actually implemented programs. Training courses directed at program managers, first-line supervisors, and middle-level health workers are held on a regular basis. 38 developing countries are now producing ORS. Another area of activity has involved development of a management information system to monitor progress toward the target of increased access to and use of oral rehydration therapy for diarrhea in children under 1 year of age. Data from 40 countries indicate that access to ORS was 6-10% in 1982 and usage was 1-4%. There have been reviews of 10 national CDD programs, 7 of which utilized a joint national-external team to collect and analyze information on the management and impact of the CDD program. During 1983, 71 new research projects were funded by the CDD program, bringing the total number of projects supported to 231 (59% in developing countries). Biomedical research has focused on development of more stable and effective ORS; the etiology and epidemiology of acute diarrhea: and development and evaluation of new diagnostic tests, vaccines, and antidiarrheal drugs. In 1982-83, the CDD program received US$1.4 million from WHO and about US$11 million from voluntary contributors. The 1984-85 budget has been set at US$19.7 million.
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  2. 2
    051309

    Control of diarrhoeal diseases.

    Martinez CA; Barua D; Merson MH

    WORLD HEALTH STATISTICS QUARTERLY. RAPPORT TRIMESTRIEL DE STATISTIQUES SANITAIRES MONDIALES. 1988; 41(2):74-81.

    This article traces the history of the worldwide struggle to control diarrheal diseases. When the 7th pandemic of cholera began in 1961, WHO responded with a greatly expanded program of activities which included cooperation with countries in training and control efforts, and research on treatment and prevention. In 1970, when the cholera pandemic spread to Africa, the emergency assistance program was reactivated, with increasing attention to the provision of appropriate treatment, especially oral rehydration therapy. Another public health problem of importance during the 1970s was the increase in antibiotic resistance of enteric bacteria. The demonstration of the effectiveness of a single formulation of oral rehydration salts (ORS) in the treatment of all diarrheas was instrumental in convincing public health administrators that diarrheal diseases control should become an essential component of primary health care and led to the creation of a global Diarrheal Diseases Control program. The Program, which has the objective of reducing childhood mortality and morbidity due to diarrheal diseases and their associated ill effects, especially malnutrition, consists of 2 main components: a health services and control component and research component. If the targets set by the Program for 1989 can be attained, it is expected that by then at least 1.5 million childhood deaths due to diarrhea will be prevented annually. (Summaries in ENG, FRE)
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  3. 3
    267393

    An assessment of the scientific achievements of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh and their relevance to AID health sector priorities.

    Buck A; Elliott V; Guerrant R; Levine M

    [Unpublished] 1983. ii, 32 p.

    This docunment reports the findings of a United States Agency for International Development (USAID) assessment of the International Centre for Diarrhoeal Disease Research, Bangladesh (ICDDR,B) which examined the scientific work of the Center in realtion to USAID's health sector priorities. USAID's Bureau of Science and Technoloby/Health has been providing core support to ICDDR,B but this grant terminated during fiscal year 1983. The multi-disciplinary assessment team was charged with making recommendations about the continuation of these funds and about any ways in which the ICDDR,B program might be modified to more closely respond to USAID's concerns. ICDDR,B's scientific reseachis of excellent quality and of great significance to the acquisition and spread of new knowledge about diarrheal diseases. There is every reason to believe that the work of scientists at ICDDR,B, which has in the past revolutionized thinking about these diseases, will continue to contribute to the search for ways to address this critical public health probelm. USAID should, therefore, continue to provide generous core support to ICDDR,B. The nature and diversity of the global diarrheal disease problem, and the ecologically determined differences in the requirements of implementation of control programs, make it impossible for ICDDR,B to carry the burden of scientific investigation alone. While the Center should continue to play a focal role, USAID is encouraged to identify and support institutions in other developing countries which could undertake scientific and operational research of diarrheal diseases. ICDDR,B could assist this globall effort by providing guidance and specialized technical consultation and training as new research programs are being developed elsewhere. The program of ICDDR,B is generally balanced and appropriate. However, the assessment team was concerned about the lack of expertise in epidemiology and immunology. (author's modified)
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