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Your search found 11 Results

  1. 1
    334255

    The United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. Strategy 2010-2015. Vision 2015.

    United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women

    [New York, New York], United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, [2011]. [32] p.

    The strategy of the United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women identifies the key roles the UN Trust Fund can play in the coming years, including driving country- and local-level implementation of existing policies and laws, serving as a global hub of knowledge on “what works,” and catalysing strong and coherent UN system-wide action to support countries in addressing the violence against women pandemic. The strategy, titled “Vision 2015,” centres on: Translating the promise to end violence against women and girls into practice: Intensifying efforts to turn policy pledges into reality for women and girls by expanding the quality and quantity of support available for effective prevention and support programmes on the ground. Paving the way to knowledge-based action on ending violence against women and girls: Generating and disseminating knowledge on “what works” in the field of ending violence against women, and serving as a hub of knowledge on best practices for adaptation and expansion. Building ownership of the UN Trust Fund throughout the UN system: Strengthening the role and contributions of the UN system at the global, regional and country levels, building on the United Nations’ commitment to “deliver as one” to advance implementation of national strategies to end violence against women and girls. Grounded in the UN Secretary-General’s “UNITE to end Violence against Women campaign, the strategy capitalizes on the UN Trust Fund’s unique potential to directly advance the campaign’s goals on the ground.
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  2. 2
    334254

    United Nations Trust Fund to End Violence against Women. Together for a better tomorrow.

    Lewis K

    [New York, New York], UN Women, [2011]. [21] p.

    Today, violence against women is a fact of life in communities and countries across the world. It transcends the bounds of geography, race, culture, class and religion. It ranges from intimate partner violence to the use of rape as a weapon of war, from sexual harassment in public spaces to harmful practices like child marriage. But tomorrow can be different. Societies change, sometimes very fast. Behaviours, norms and institutions that are commonplace and unremarkable in the eyes of one generation can be rejected by the next. The UN Trust Fund to End Violence against Women, established in 1996, embodies the heartening awakening of global consciousness. The only multilateral grant-making mechanism exclusively devoted to supporting efforts to end violence against women and girls, the UN Trust Fund works with partners across the world to secure much-needed services for women and girls affected by violence and to invest in long-term solutions to prevent violence from happening in the first place. For fifteen years, the UN Trust Fund has supported innovative, effective initiatives designed to transform the ways in which people think and act. The brochure “Together for a Better Tomorrow” highlights the work of the UN Trust Fund and its partners, delivering on the international community’s commitment to making good on its promises to end violence against women and girls.
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  3. 3
    309774

    Trinidad and Guyana: Increasing sustainability by expanding services in the Caribbean.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 May; (4):[2] p..

    A team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region traveled to Trinidad to conduct a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten affiliates who have programs on HIV prevention and youth. Then they went to Guyana to provide technical assistance and training for a sustainability model. Lucella, IPPF/WHR's Senior Program Advisor for the Caribbean, was recently in Trinidad as a member of a team conducting a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten IPPF/WHR affiliates. The following week she traveled to Guyana with another team from WHR, one that provided training in the use of the S2000ä Financial Model, a cash flow forecasting tool developed by the EFS (Endowment Fund for Sustainability). (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    309765

    Haiti: Improving proposal writing and evaluation skills in Haiti.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Feb; (13):[2] p..

    Several NGOs and government agencies, including IPPF/WHR's affiliate PROFAMIL, are working hard to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of women, men, and youth in Haiti. Recently, IPPF/WHR has sought to support these efforts by strengthening the capacity of PROFAMIL and other agencies to develop and implement results-oriented projects that can become sustainable. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR traveled to Haiti in January 2002 to conduct a project design and proposal writing workshop with representatives from several local NGOs, including PROFAMIL, FOSREF, VDH, UNFPA, and the ministries of Health and Education. Participants came armed with statistics and other information on a specific problem that their organization would like to address, as well as intervention ideas. First, participants developed conceptual models for their project ideas; then they wrote actual proposals to seek funding. Participants used tools, such as a conceptual model and a logical framework, to assist them in the project design and proposal-writing process, with a particular emphasis on integrating monitoring and evaluation plans into their proposed interventions. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    286833

    34 Million Friends hits $1.5 million mark.

    Population 2005. 2003 Dec; 5(4):16.

    In July 2002, the United States government withheld $34 million in funding for the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). According to UNFPA, the withheld U.S. funds could prevent 4,700 maternal deaths, 60,000 serious maternal illnesses and more than 70,000 infant and child deaths. Without this crucial funding from the United States, UNFPA, with a budget of only $270 million worldwide, will struggle financially to adhere to women throughout the world. Jane Roberts of California and Lois Abraham of New Mexico both independently struck up the idea of a grassroots campaign to raise the $34 million that the U.S. withheld from UNFPA. The goal of the 34 Million Friends of the UNFPA campaign is to enlist 34 million Americans to send one dollar to UNFPA to show support for the organization’s important work worldwide. With the campaign in action for almost a year and a half, 34 Million Friends has raised over $1.5 million as of December 2003. (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    279106

    Impact of the Polio Eradication Initiative on donor contributions to routine immunization.

    Levin A; Jorissen J; Linkins J; McArthur C

    Bethesda, Maryland, Abt Associates, Partnerships for Health Reform, 2001 Mar. [26] p. (Special Initiatives Report No. 36; USAID Contract No. HRN-C-00-95-00024)

    While the polio eradication initiative has been highly successful in lowering the number of polio cases worldwide, questions have arisen about the impact of the initiative on the functioning and financing of health systems as a whole and routine immunization more specifically. While some studies have investigated the impact of polio eradication on the functioning of health systems, few have been able to examine the impact on financing. This study is the second conducted by the United States Agency for International Development’s Partnerships for Health Reform Project on the impact of the polio eradication initiative on the financing of routine immunization activities. The first study examined funding trends for polio eradication and routine immunization in three countries: Bangladesh, Côte d’Ivoire, and Morocco. This study looks at funding trends among international organizations and donors, and the impact that their funding of polio eradication activities has had on their funding of routine immunization activities. The study findings indicate that while some short-term decreases in donor funding for routine immunization appear to have taken place as polio eradication initiative activities were introduced and accelerated, on the whole, donor funding for routine immunization support does not appear to have decreased. (author's)
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  7. 7
    191615

    Building human capacity for 3 by 5.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2003. [2] p. (WHO/HIV/2003.14)

    Globally up to 100 000 people need to be trained for their contribution to making 3 by 5 possible—including those involved in the management and delivery of anti-retroviral treatment (ART) services, those working on testing and counselling and other entry points to ART, and the many community treatment supporters assisting people living with HIV/AIDS who are receiving medication. The challenge is enormous, and the impact of HIV/AIDS on the workforce is exacerbating the already difficult situation. The World Health Organization (WHO) has developed a ‘Human Capacity-Building Plan' that proposes a set of unprecedented steps by which WHO, together with partners, will help countries to develop and sustain the workforce necessary to achieve 3 by 5. It addresses five critical elements for building and sustaining human capacity at the country level. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    177426
    Peer Reviewed

    World Food Programme gears up to help entire Iraq population. WFP says that in 4-6 months' time it will have a caseload of five million war-affected, vulnerable people.

    Ashraf H

    Lancet. 2003 Apr 5; 361(9364):1189.

    According to WFP’s 6-month plan, the agency hopes that within 1 month security conditions will improve so that its staff can resume full aid work for all Iraq’s citizens. After 4 months WFP hopes Iraq will be able to launch its own supply chain and that the agency will be able to scale down its operation. However, in the last 2 months of this phase WFP considers that it will have to focus on five million vulnerable and war-affected people inside and outside Iraq. (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    176786

    Call to make Africa cities safe and liveable.

    Africa Health. 2002 Sep; 24(6):4.

    A leading expert on the links between poverty and disease in Africa has called for greater `global solidarity' between international corporations and funding organisations, the environmental and health sectors, and the state in Africa to make its major cities safe and livable. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    172511
    Peer Reviewed

    Unicef comes under attack for Big Mac funding deal.

    Dyer O

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 2002 Oct 26; 325(7370):923.

    Unicef, the United Nations Children’s Fund, has come under fire from children’s advocates for concluding a fundraising alliance with the McDonald’s chain of fast food restaurants. A petition signed by delegates from the World Alliance for Breastfeeding Action accuses Unicef of compromising its mission to promote good nutrition by associating with the giant American corporation. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    167934

    Eradication of a disease: keys to success.

    Joyner AM; Rogers M

    [Washington, D.C.], Population Reference Bureau [PRB], 2002. 3 p.

    In its efforts to eradicate polio from the planet, the WHO developed a public health initiative that includes routine immunization coverage, staging annual mass immunization drives, increasing surveillance for cases and wild poliovirus, and conducting door-to-door immunization in high-risk areas. In effect, the number of cases has reduced from 35,251 in 1988 to 5186 by 1997. It was noted that the success to the polio eradication strategy is attributed to: 1) selection of a virus that can be eradicated; 2) support from variety of donors and organizers; 3) global consensus regarding priority; 4) organization and transportation sufficient to reach the most remote places; 5) surveillance; and 6) low vaccine cost. However, the WHO notes that polio eradication efforts still face problems in securing access to all children, obtaining funds, and maintaining political commitment.
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