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  1. 1
    059166

    Progress report number 5.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1989 May. [3], 79 p. (WHO/GPA/DIR/89.4)

    In February 1987, WHO established the Global Programme on AIDS (GPA) to direct and coordinate global AIDS prevention, control, research, and education. GPA is under the Office of the Director with 2 administrative divisions (management, administration, and information and national program support) and 5 scientific and technical divisions (Epidemiological support and research, health promotion, social and behavioral research, biomedical research, and surveillance, forecasting and impact assessment). It coordinates worldwide AIDS surveillance and receives statistics from WHO collaborating Centres on AIDS, Member Countries ministries of health, and WHO Regional offices. From 1985- 1989, the total number of AIDS cases worldwide rose >15 times. As of March 1, 1989, 145 countries reported a total of 141,894 cases with the Americas reporting the highest number of cases (99, 752). This total is, however, an underestimate since AIDS cases are often not recognized or reported to national health authorities. GPA cosponsors international conferences and policy related meetings, such as the annual International Conference on AIDS. Further, GPA collaborates with other UN organizations and other WHO activities, e.g. UNFPA and Diarrhoeal Disease Control Programme, regarding the effect of HIV infection on their programs. Some initiatives that GPA spearheaded and coordinates include protecting the global blood supply from HIV, developing a strategy for distribution of condoms and viricides in national AIDS programs, and strengthening research capability. This report also lists regional and intercountry activities, e.g. WHO joined a French organization in producing a film about AIDS in Africa.
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  2. 2
    059784

    [Motion pictures and commercial television: a co-production of public and private sectors to promote family planning in Mexico] Cine y television comercial: una coproduccion de los sectores publico y privado para promover la planificacion familiar en Mexico.

    Ruiz de Chavez S; Urbina Fuentes M; Schlosser R

    [Unpublished] 1989. Presented at the II Congreso Latino-Americano de Planificacion Familiar, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 20-24, 1989. [2], 6, [5] p.

    A film about a young couple experiencing infertility and a television series which introduces new customs in each independent chapter were 2 productions of a cooperative program of the private and public sectors to promote family planning in Mexico. Each production questions sexual stereotypes and opens the possibility of reflection on themes related to sexuality and family planning. The target group is young people aged 15-30 years. The topics covered were selected on the basis of KAP studies to identify areas of conflict and of common interest. The Office of Health provided technical advice and coordination and provided 70% of the financing for the film and 50% for the television series using UN Fund for Population Activities funds. The films combine entertainment with educational content. The producers, script writers, and specialists in sexuality and family planning worked together to develop the scripts by defining the objectives of the project and identifying the most relevant themes. The film, "Let's Try It Again" (Va de Nuez) employed scenes from everyday life in a comedy format with characters displaying a mixture of positive and negative characteristics. The topic of infertility, a perinatal death, and an unplanned pregnancy in a young adolescent were the vehicle for consideration of several themes related to reproductive life: the decision to have a child, intracouple communications, ideas about paternity and maternity, unprotected sexual relations, the importance of the time between marriage and the 1st birth, and male infertility, among others. The weekly television series "The Good Customs" (Las Buenas Costumbres) consisted of 26 episodes lasting 24 minutes each. Each episode is independent in plot development but all are thematically related. The protagonist is a physician. Various common and recurring situations in Mexican life are approached through the physician-patient relationship.
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  3. 3
    058443

    WHO-Shanghai Collaborating Center in Health Education: strategic scheme for development.

    Li VC

    HYGIE. 1989 Mar; 8(1):26-9.

    Activities of the WHO-Shanghai Collaborating Center in Health Education are described. The Center is a joint venture between WHO and the Shanghai Health Education Institute, and as such it is intended to have international significance. Its aims are to strengthen the impact of health education in primary care and to utilize effective health education technologies. Since 1956 the Center has provided guidance to districts and counties in the form of promotional materials for basic medical units, trained health personnel and conducted health promotion activities. There are 70 staff in 5 divisions: publications, art, publicity, administration and audiovisuals. Methodologies are both tested and used as a vehicle for human resource development, by training health staff on the job. Some current projects include anti-smoking educational programs for workplaces incorporating baseline and follow-up assessments, and production of media programs such as documentaries, TV series, short spots, and video cassettes, approximately 1 every 3 weeks. Several productions won national awards in 1986. An international exchange program with the University of California at Los Angeles was held to explore how the Chinese apply health education in the community. Consultation services are provided through WHO. Progress in health education in China is limited by the lack of translated literature on health education.
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  4. 4
    271691

    Population, documentary on the population problem.

    van Hees Y; Vereecken B

    The Hague, Netherlands, Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Development Cooperation Information Department, 1989 Nov. 26 p.

    Several articles are presented in this pamphlet which are based on a documentary on the population problem made by the Development Cooperation Information Department of the Netherlands in cooperation with the Veronica Broadcasting Organization. A population conference was held at the Royal Tropical Institute in Amsterdam from November, 6-9, 1989, sponsored by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA). Filmed in Brazil, Indonesia, and Zimbabwe, the documentary was shown on November 6 at the conference and was broadcast on Dutch television on November 8. 66 countries attended the conference where the population increase was discussed. Also discussed were steps to control population. Professor Kirk van de Kaa, director of the Netherlands Institute for Advanced Studies (NIAS), and professor at the University of Amsterdam, was interviewed about population policy. A typical visit by a Zimbabwe National Family Planning Council (ZNFPC) nurse is covered. Population growth in Zimbabwe is alarming. The ZNFPC was set up in 1980, shortly after the country gained independence. The Council encounters much difficulty in carrying out its programs. Zimbabwean women often marry before age 20, and have 7 children by age 50. There is debate in the press about whether family planning is working. The 1989 World Population Report states that the population of the world will double in the next 50 years. UNFPA is celebrating its 20th anniversary. UNFPA's views on family planning and the world population problem are given. An article follows about Indonesian family planning services; BKKBN, the Indonesian national family planning organization, and Dr. Haryono Suyono, head of BKKBN. Population growth in Indonesia has declined to 2.1%. In the Indonesian village of Jati Karya, a group of women are engaged in the economic activity of making shoebrushes and other brushes for households. These women are participating in the family planning programs and are asking for an economic loan through the BKKBN from the Indonesian government. The philosophy is that women will have fewer children if their status is raised. Dr. Nafis Sadik, executive director of UNFPA, has been interviewed concerning her thoughts on population policy. An article follows on the causes of desertification in Africa. Population growth is the main cause. The final article focuses on Bangladesh, where contraceptive availability alone does not mean that family planning programs will succeed is demonstrated by the Matlab project.
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  5. 5
    271600

    A unique collaboration in Chile.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. AIDS Prevention Unit; League of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    AIDS WATCH. 1989; (8):8.

    The Chilean Red Cross Society and the family planning association--APROFA, International Planned Parenthood Federation's affiliate, are joining forces to help prevent the spread of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. APROFA established a working group to study the knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behavior of students at the National Training Institute, INACAP. 7000 students were sampled in 11 Chilean cities. The study found that 36% of the females, and 77% of males were sexually active before the age of 20. Nearly 1/2 of the women and 1/5 of the men did not know that condoms could protect them against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy. APROFA designed a program to increase students knowledge of AIDS, reduce promiscuity and increase knowledge of and use of condoms. In October, 1988 an educational package distributed, consisting of a training manual, slides, educational booklets, a poster, and a video of 3 films. It has proved so successful that APROFA has adapted it for community groups, educational institutions, and its youth program. APROFA/Red Cross nurses and Red Cross volunteers have participated in workshops and training with the package. The Red Cross has organized AIDS-related activities in Chile since 1986, including education campaigns, information for blood donors, and a telephone hotline to provide AIDS counseling. Goals are to target more poor areas and groups outside of society's mainstream in the next year for sex education and information on STDs.
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