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  1. 1
    020382

    Report of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Planning Programmes.

    United Nations. Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East [ECAFE]

    In: United Nations. Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East [ECAFE]. Report of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Programmes and selected papers. Held at Singapore, 5-15 September 1967. Bangkok, Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East, [1968]. 1-68. (Asian Population Studies Series No. 3)

    The objective of the Working Group on Communications Aspects of Family Planning Programs, meeting during September 1967, was to collate, examine, and evaluate the collective experience in the region of the use of communications media in family planning programs and to try to develop a basic model for using communications to provide information and motivation in family planning programs as an aid to governmental action in this field. Other purposes were: to evolve appropriate guidelines for operational research and evaluation of family planning communication programs; to discuss the best ways in which the family planning communication work can be strengthened through regional cooperation under the aegis of the Economic Commission for Asia and the Far East (ECAFE); and to seek practical methods of continuing the exchange and pooling of data in the communication effort within the region and from other areas. 20 participants from 13 member countries participated. This report of the Working Group covers the following: national development and family planning; communications in the context of family planning programs (types of communication; objectives of family planning communications; specific functions of family planning communications; target audiences, groups, and individuals; messages; media and materials; staff; and costs); general guidelines for family planning communication programs; communication programs in countries of the ECAFE region (Ceylon, China, Hong Kong, India, Indonesia, Iran, Japan, Republic of Korea, Malaysia, Pakistan, the Philippines, Singapore, and Thailand); communications media and methods (radio and television, films, newspapers and other printed materials, hoardings and display signs, posters, exhibitions, campaigns, mailings, face to face communications); communication aspects of special significance; practical aspects of a communication organization; production and distribution of communication materials; specialized training for communications; and research and evaluation. Generally, communications about family planning are of 2 types: informal, characterized as being spontaneous, unplanned; and formal communications, those that are planned, organized, intended to serve specific purposes. Family planning communications serve several purposes. Among them are those of informing, educating, motivating, and reassuring large numbers and varieties of people and of legitimating the practice of family planning. The information component of family planning communications will be directed toward individuals, groups, or the public both within the family planning organization and outside it.
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  2. 2
    272608

    World population day, 11 July 1990.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [Unpublished] 1990. 22 p.

    World Population Day (WPD) was observed on July 1, 1990 in more than 90 countries with media coverage or special events. July 11 was designated WPD by the UNDP/UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA) Governing Council. This was the 1st year WPD was observed. A poster was issued in many languages and distributed globally. A brochure was produced that featured a reproduction of the poster on the cover. A special videotape entitled "Population: The Challenge Ahead" was produced. Cassettes were sent to all UNFPA country directors. A "Population Issues Briefing Kit" was produced and sent to UNFPA headquarters and field staff. Media coverage was extensive. African nations had a variety of event of WPD. In Benin, a major conference was held to discuss "Rapid Population Growth: Its effects on satisfying basic needs." A television program with the same theme was shown and a radio show for children featured songs, poems, and sketches. Burundi also held a conference on the problems of population growth, the legal and social status of women, and the division of land. A dance competition took place in Cape Verde. WPD observances in the Congo were done over a 3-day period. There were special radio and television broadcasts. Guinea devoted a whole week (July 5-11, 1990) to population issues which ended with the celebration of WPD. Tanzania had an award ceremony for the winners of an essay contest for primary and secondary school students on "Population and the Quality of Life." In Iraq, a special television program was shown which involved UNFPA visual materials. Population Day activities also took place in Europe, Asia, the Pacific, and the Arab States, as well as Asia and the Pacific. The national television network in India broadcast the videotape. Extensive coverage was given to WPD by Sri Lankan radio, television, and the press. Many Latin American and Caribbean countries also had special activities. A whole week was given to WPD in Mexico. Jamaica also held an essay contest for schoolchildren on population issues. The winners received copies of the UNFPA book "The Exploding City." The UN organizations and specialized agencies also held WPD activities, as did many nongovernmental organizations, intergovernmental organizations, and training and research institutes.
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  3. 3
    059784

    [Motion pictures and commercial television: a co-production of public and private sectors to promote family planning in Mexico] Cine y television comercial: una coproduccion de los sectores publico y privado para promover la planificacion familiar en Mexico.

    Ruiz de Chavez S; Urbina Fuentes M; Schlosser R

    [Unpublished] 1989. Presented at the II Congreso Latino-Americano de Planificacion Familiar, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 20-24, 1989. [2], 6, [5] p.

    A film about a young couple experiencing infertility and a television series which introduces new customs in each independent chapter were 2 productions of a cooperative program of the private and public sectors to promote family planning in Mexico. Each production questions sexual stereotypes and opens the possibility of reflection on themes related to sexuality and family planning. The target group is young people aged 15-30 years. The topics covered were selected on the basis of KAP studies to identify areas of conflict and of common interest. The Office of Health provided technical advice and coordination and provided 70% of the financing for the film and 50% for the television series using UN Fund for Population Activities funds. The films combine entertainment with educational content. The producers, script writers, and specialists in sexuality and family planning worked together to develop the scripts by defining the objectives of the project and identifying the most relevant themes. The film, "Let's Try It Again" (Va de Nuez) employed scenes from everyday life in a comedy format with characters displaying a mixture of positive and negative characteristics. The topic of infertility, a perinatal death, and an unplanned pregnancy in a young adolescent were the vehicle for consideration of several themes related to reproductive life: the decision to have a child, intracouple communications, ideas about paternity and maternity, unprotected sexual relations, the importance of the time between marriage and the 1st birth, and male infertility, among others. The weekly television series "The Good Customs" (Las Buenas Costumbres) consisted of 26 episodes lasting 24 minutes each. Each episode is independent in plot development but all are thematically related. The protagonist is a physician. Various common and recurring situations in Mexican life are approached through the physician-patient relationship.
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  4. 4
    058443

    WHO-Shanghai Collaborating Center in Health Education: strategic scheme for development.

    Li VC

    HYGIE. 1989 Mar; 8(1):26-9.

    Activities of the WHO-Shanghai Collaborating Center in Health Education are described. The Center is a joint venture between WHO and the Shanghai Health Education Institute, and as such it is intended to have international significance. Its aims are to strengthen the impact of health education in primary care and to utilize effective health education technologies. Since 1956 the Center has provided guidance to districts and counties in the form of promotional materials for basic medical units, trained health personnel and conducted health promotion activities. There are 70 staff in 5 divisions: publications, art, publicity, administration and audiovisuals. Methodologies are both tested and used as a vehicle for human resource development, by training health staff on the job. Some current projects include anti-smoking educational programs for workplaces incorporating baseline and follow-up assessments, and production of media programs such as documentaries, TV series, short spots, and video cassettes, approximately 1 every 3 weeks. Several productions won national awards in 1986. An international exchange program with the University of California at Los Angeles was held to explore how the Chinese apply health education in the community. Consultation services are provided through WHO. Progress in health education in China is limited by the lack of translated literature on health education.
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