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Your search found 5 Results

  1. 1
    183255

    Report on field test of the WHO Decision-Making Tool (DMT) for family planning clients and providers in Mexico. Draft. [Informe sobre pruebas de campo de la Herramienta de toma de decisiones (DMT, Decision-Making Tool) de la OMS para los clientes y prestadores de planificación familiar en México. Versión preliminar]

    Kim YM; Martin T; Johnson S; Church K; Rinehart W

    [Unpublished] 2003 Apr 13. 8 p.

    To test the usefulness of the flipchart on the quality of counseling, this study compared videotaped counseling sessions conducted by the same providers before and after they were trained to use the DMT and had practice using it. Data were collected at two points in time: a baseline round before the intervention began and a post-intervention round one month after providers were trained to use the DMT. Qualitative data were collected through interviews with providers and clients to complement the data from videotaped sessions. Participating in the study were 17 providers working at nine Secretary of Health facilities of the Government of Mexico, D.F. They included 9 doctors, 4 nurses, 3 social workers, and 1 psychologist. Eight of the participating facilities were hospitals, and one was a health center. At each facility, one doctor who routinely provided family planning services participated in the study. In some facilities, a nurse, social worker, or psychologist, each of whom routinely provided FP services, also participated in the study. Each provider was videotaped with about 8 clients, that is, 4 clients per round of data collection. Each set of 4 clients included one new client with a contraceptive method in mind, one new client without a method in mind, one returning client with a problem, and one returning client without a problem. Only 13 of the 17 providers had complete data from both the baseline and post-intervention rounds. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    064331

    Drawing attention to family planning.

    JOICFP NEWS. 1990 Mar; (189):7.

    In February 1990, the Mexican award winning director and animator, Carlos Carrera, went to Tokyo to oversee the photographing of the color frames (brought from Mexico) of the sex education animated film "Music for Two". The film begins with a warning that it should be shown as part of a sex education program. Further, a trained advisor guides the audience during the recommended discussion following the film. "Music for Two" is set in a large city and features a young female teen who daydreams about imaginary lovers. She soon discovers that her young male next door neighbor is interested in her. The moral of the story is that, once a woman is an adolescent, she must consider her future and have lifelong goals. In order for her to do so, however, she must know her mind and body, appreciate them, and not renounce them. This animated short feature includes both English and Spanish versions targeted to adolescents in their mid to late teens, especially females, in Latin America and the Caribbean. Mr. Carrera predicted that conservative older individuals will most likely not approve of "Music for Two". The Japanese Organization for International Cooperation in Family Planning (JOICFP) and the UNFPA sponsored this animated film and the Mexican Family Planning Foundation (MEXFAM) participated in its production. The Sakura Motion Picture Company in Japan and Kinam SCL International in Mexico coproduced it. The Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs underwrote the English version and the UNFPA and IPPF underwrote the Spanish version. Further, in 1989, Mr. Carrera played a major role in a successful sex education animated feature titled "Blue Pigeon". This film was geared to youth in their early to mid teens, however.
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  3. 3
    059166

    Progress report number 5.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Global Programme on AIDS

    [Unpublished] 1989 May. [3], 79 p. (WHO/GPA/DIR/89.4)

    In February 1987, WHO established the Global Programme on AIDS (GPA) to direct and coordinate global AIDS prevention, control, research, and education. GPA is under the Office of the Director with 2 administrative divisions (management, administration, and information and national program support) and 5 scientific and technical divisions (Epidemiological support and research, health promotion, social and behavioral research, biomedical research, and surveillance, forecasting and impact assessment). It coordinates worldwide AIDS surveillance and receives statistics from WHO collaborating Centres on AIDS, Member Countries ministries of health, and WHO Regional offices. From 1985- 1989, the total number of AIDS cases worldwide rose >15 times. As of March 1, 1989, 145 countries reported a total of 141,894 cases with the Americas reporting the highest number of cases (99, 752). This total is, however, an underestimate since AIDS cases are often not recognized or reported to national health authorities. GPA cosponsors international conferences and policy related meetings, such as the annual International Conference on AIDS. Further, GPA collaborates with other UN organizations and other WHO activities, e.g. UNFPA and Diarrhoeal Disease Control Programme, regarding the effect of HIV infection on their programs. Some initiatives that GPA spearheaded and coordinates include protecting the global blood supply from HIV, developing a strategy for distribution of condoms and viricides in national AIDS programs, and strengthening research capability. This report also lists regional and intercountry activities, e.g. WHO joined a French organization in producing a film about AIDS in Africa.
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  4. 4
    059784

    [Motion pictures and commercial television: a co-production of public and private sectors to promote family planning in Mexico] Cine y television comercial: una coproduccion de los sectores publico y privado para promover la planificacion familiar en Mexico.

    Ruiz de Chavez S; Urbina Fuentes M; Schlosser R

    [Unpublished] 1989. Presented at the II Congreso Latino-Americano de Planificacion Familiar, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, August 20-24, 1989. [2], 6, [5] p.

    A film about a young couple experiencing infertility and a television series which introduces new customs in each independent chapter were 2 productions of a cooperative program of the private and public sectors to promote family planning in Mexico. Each production questions sexual stereotypes and opens the possibility of reflection on themes related to sexuality and family planning. The target group is young people aged 15-30 years. The topics covered were selected on the basis of KAP studies to identify areas of conflict and of common interest. The Office of Health provided technical advice and coordination and provided 70% of the financing for the film and 50% for the television series using UN Fund for Population Activities funds. The films combine entertainment with educational content. The producers, script writers, and specialists in sexuality and family planning worked together to develop the scripts by defining the objectives of the project and identifying the most relevant themes. The film, "Let's Try It Again" (Va de Nuez) employed scenes from everyday life in a comedy format with characters displaying a mixture of positive and negative characteristics. The topic of infertility, a perinatal death, and an unplanned pregnancy in a young adolescent were the vehicle for consideration of several themes related to reproductive life: the decision to have a child, intracouple communications, ideas about paternity and maternity, unprotected sexual relations, the importance of the time between marriage and the 1st birth, and male infertility, among others. The weekly television series "The Good Customs" (Las Buenas Costumbres) consisted of 26 episodes lasting 24 minutes each. Each episode is independent in plot development but all are thematically related. The protagonist is a physician. Various common and recurring situations in Mexican life are approached through the physician-patient relationship.
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  5. 5
    271600

    A unique collaboration in Chile.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. AIDS Prevention Unit; League of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies

    AIDS WATCH. 1989; (8):8.

    The Chilean Red Cross Society and the family planning association--APROFA, International Planned Parenthood Federation's affiliate, are joining forces to help prevent the spread of the acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS) and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection. APROFA established a working group to study the knowledge, attitudes, and sexual behavior of students at the National Training Institute, INACAP. 7000 students were sampled in 11 Chilean cities. The study found that 36% of the females, and 77% of males were sexually active before the age of 20. Nearly 1/2 of the women and 1/5 of the men did not know that condoms could protect them against sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and pregnancy. APROFA designed a program to increase students knowledge of AIDS, reduce promiscuity and increase knowledge of and use of condoms. In October, 1988 an educational package distributed, consisting of a training manual, slides, educational booklets, a poster, and a video of 3 films. It has proved so successful that APROFA has adapted it for community groups, educational institutions, and its youth program. APROFA/Red Cross nurses and Red Cross volunteers have participated in workshops and training with the package. The Red Cross has organized AIDS-related activities in Chile since 1986, including education campaigns, information for blood donors, and a telephone hotline to provide AIDS counseling. Goals are to target more poor areas and groups outside of society's mainstream in the next year for sex education and information on STDs.
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