Your search found 65 Results

  1. 1
    309779

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 2.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Sep; (9):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the IPPF Africa Regional Office visited PROFAMILIA/Colombia in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services first-hand. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project that is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). IPPF/WHR had identified PROFAMILIA as a "best practices" FPA which could offer its expertise in developing youth programs to the FPA in Ethiopia. Zhenja, the IPPF/WHR Communications Manager, was there to facilitate the visit and identify needs for technical assistance. (excerpt)
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  2. 2
    309778

    China: Helping the People's Republic of China introduce a gender perspective in its 'reoriented' family planning program.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Aug; (8):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff traveled to China to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation project "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." They reviewed some basic concepts of gender and quality, and then examined the six instruments in the manual that is being adapted for China. In July 2001, Judith H., director of IPPF/WHR's Sexual and Reproductive Health Unit, visited with members of the China Population Information and Research Center and the All-China Women's Federation in Beijing to provide technical assistance to the Ford Foundation-supported project, "Gender Perspective in Quality of Care in Family Planning." (excerpt)
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  3. 3
    309776

    Belize: Efficient services with a human face.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jul; (6):[2] p..

    International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region staff visited Belize in June 2001 to work with the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA) on sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan for sexual and reproductive health care. The slogan they developed was Efficient Services with a Human Face." IPPF/WHR Senior Program Advisors Lucella and Humberto were in Belize in June 2001 to work with IPPF/WHR's affiliate there, the Belize Family Life Association (BFLA), on the sustainability and management aspects of its strategic plan. BFLA recently received a grant from the Summit Foundation to construct a new headquarters that will allow for expanded services. (excerpt)
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  4. 4
    309775

    Guatemala: Orienting affiliates on the design and implementation of a state-of-the-art management system.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Jun; (5):[2] p..

    A three-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region conducted a training workshop in Guatemala for several affiliates on the design and implementation of the Integrated Management System and also received feedback on the system. A three-person team from IPPF/WHR recently conducted a training workshop in Antigua, Guatemala for several IPPF/WHR affiliates on the design and implementation of the highly anticipated Integrated Management System (IMS). The workshop was an opportunity both to orient the participants to the new system as well as to get their feedback on the IMS and the extent to which it meets their needs. WHR team members included Leslie, Director of MIS, María Cristina, Regional Supplies Officer, and Rupal, Evaluation Officer. (excerpt)
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  5. 5
    309774

    Trinidad and Guyana: Increasing sustainability by expanding services in the Caribbean.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 May; (4):[2] p..

    A team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region traveled to Trinidad to conduct a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten affiliates who have programs on HIV prevention and youth. Then they went to Guyana to provide technical assistance and training for a sustainability model. Lucella, IPPF/WHR's Senior Program Advisor for the Caribbean, was recently in Trinidad as a member of a team conducting a Proposal Writing Workshop for ten IPPF/WHR affiliates. The following week she traveled to Guyana with another team from WHR, one that provided training in the use of the S2000ä Financial Model, a cash flow forecasting tool developed by the EFS (Endowment Fund for Sustainability). (excerpt)
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  6. 6
    309773

    Colombia: Offering expertise to a sister organization in Ethiopia, Part 1.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (3):[2] p..

    Representatives from the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) and the International Planned Parenthood Federation, Africa Regional Office visited the Asociación Pro-Bienestar de la Familia Colombiana (PROFAMILIA) in March 2001 to see PROFAMILIA's youth programs and services. The exchange was the first half of a technical assistance project; PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization that could offer its expertise to FGAE. Representatives from PROFAMILIA/Colombia visited the Family Guidance Association of Ethiopia (FGAE) in August 2001 for the second half of a technical assistance exchange project. The project, which in March 2001 allowed for FGAE representatives to visit Colombia, is funded by the IPPF "i3" Youth Program (Innovate, Indicate, Inform). FGAE is expanding its institutional focus from family planning to sexual and reproductive health with a special emphasis on young people. PROFAMILIA was identified as a "best practices" organization to provide technical assistance on youth programs. (excerpt)
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  7. 7
    309772

    Haiti: Development of management and logistics resources to improve quality of care.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Apr; (2):[2] p..

    A four-person team from International Planned Parenthood Federation, Western Hemisphere Region visited Haiti to provide technical assistance, focusing on project management and reporting, logistics and budgeting. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR was in Haiti on March 4th - 9th to work with two of the country's largest family planning organizations, PROFAMIL and FOSREF. Team members included Eva, a Program Advisor and resource development specialist; Rebecca, an Evaluation Officer; María Cristina, the Regional Supplies Officer; and Marcos, a Financial Advisor. IPPF/WHR monitors PROFAMIL's IPPF Vision 2000 Project to improve quality of care and increase access to SRH services. On this technical assistance visit, the IPPF/WHR team focused on project management and reporting, logistics, and budgeting. (excerpt)
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  8. 8
    309771

    Nicaragua: Sexual and reproductive health for adolescents: a three country approach.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2001 Mar; (1):[2] p..

    IPPF/WHR Evaluation Officer Rebecca was in Nicaragua February 11 - 17, 2001 to provide technical assistance for the UNFPA/UNFIP project, Sexual and Reproductive Health for Adolescents -- A Three Country Approach: Haiti, Nicaragua and Ecuador. "The great thing about this project is that it integrates the concept of adolescent SRH into the municipal governments' role in their communities and really institutionalizes an adolescent perspective. Working with local partners and the local municipal governments -- giving them a stake, a sense of ownership -- greatly increases the chance of this project carrying on after the initial funding ends. "This trip was interesting because we got to see a lot of the country in our visits to two of the participating municipalities. Jalapa is about six hours north of Managua. We had to leave our hotel at five o'clock in the morning. The country is still recovering from [Hurricane] Mitch [which struck Nicaragua in 1998]. The roads are really bumpy. While many towns that we passed through are made up of small adobe huts with a water pump in the center of town where people line up to get their water, we also passed towns with small concrete houses built with funds from international relief efforts after the hurricane. One village had a series of concrete UNICEF latrines." (excerpt)
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  9. 9
    309766

    Ecuador: Building a health center dedicated to Ecuadorian youth.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Jul; (14):[2] p..

    Alejandra, senior program officer, and Rebecca, evaluation officer, traveled to Ecuador in June 2002 to monitor the implementation of two adolescent projects funded by the Hewlett and Turner foundations. We spent the first two days of our trip in Guayaquil, where IPPF/WHR's affiliate, APROFE, has its main offices and clinics. This organization has begun providing services tailored to the needs of youth for the first time. Their idea was to build a separate space for youth with funds from the Hewlett Foundation to allow the clients to have access to health care providers who are specially trained to meet their needs as young people. It will also provide them with greater privacy. Unfortunately, there have been some construction delays for the new youth center. APROFE is therefore providing youth services in a section of the main clinic's office which has been refurbished as a youth clinic. I was struck by how friendly and colorful the office looked. There were lots of posters and signs painted by the youth. We also saw the blueprints for the youth center, which APROFE hopes to have completed by December. (excerpt)
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  10. 10
    309765

    Haiti: Improving proposal writing and evaluation skills in Haiti.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]. Western Hemisphere Region [WHR]

    Notes from the Field. 2002 Feb; (13):[2] p..

    Several NGOs and government agencies, including IPPF/WHR's affiliate PROFAMIL, are working hard to address the sexual and reproductive health needs of women, men, and youth in Haiti. Recently, IPPF/WHR has sought to support these efforts by strengthening the capacity of PROFAMIL and other agencies to develop and implement results-oriented projects that can become sustainable. A four-person team from IPPF/WHR traveled to Haiti in January 2002 to conduct a project design and proposal writing workshop with representatives from several local NGOs, including PROFAMIL, FOSREF, VDH, UNFPA, and the ministries of Health and Education. Participants came armed with statistics and other information on a specific problem that their organization would like to address, as well as intervention ideas. First, participants developed conceptual models for their project ideas; then they wrote actual proposals to seek funding. Participants used tools, such as a conceptual model and a logical framework, to assist them in the project design and proposal-writing process, with a particular emphasis on integrating monitoring and evaluation plans into their proposed interventions. (excerpt)
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  11. 11
    304800

    United States. Exploring the environment / population links and the role of major donors, foundations and nongovernmental organizations.

    Lule EL; Obaid TA; Chamie J; Neuse M; Gillespie D

    In: No vacancy: global responses to the human population explosion, edited by Michael Tobias, Bob Gillespie, Elizabeth Hughes and Jane Gray Morrison. Pasadena, California, Hope Publishing House, 2006. 103-196.

    The mission of the World Bank is to fight poverty and improve the living standards of people in the developing world. It is a development bank which provides loans, policy advice, technical assistance and knowledge-sharing services to low- and middle-income countries to reduce poverty. It also promotes growth to create jobs and to empower poor people to take advantage of these opportunities. The World Bank works to bridge the economic divide between rich and poor countries. As one of the world's largest sources of development assistance, it supports the efforts of developing countries to build schools and health centers, provide water and electricity, fight disease and protect the environment. As one of the United Nations' specialized agencies, it has 184 member countries that are jointly responsible for how the institution is financed and how its money is spent. There are 10,000 development professionals from nearly every country in the world who work in its Washington DC headquarters and in its 109 country offices. The World Bank is the world's largest long-term financier of HIV/AIDS programs and its current commitments for HIV/AIDS amount to more than $1.3 billion --half of which is targeted for sub-Saharan Africa. (excerpt)
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  12. 12
    186444

    Chronicling the end of polio.

    Andaló P

    Perspectives in Health. 2003; 8(3):10-17.

    In its 3,500-year known history, polio has robbed millions of boys and girls, men and women of their freedom to move at will. Vaccines developed in the 1950s began to rein in the virus, dramatically reducing the disease's incidence through massive immunization campaigns. The Americas region was the first to eradicate the wild strain of the virus and was declared polio-free in 1994. Luis Fermín, a 3-year-old Peruvian, was the hemisphere's last registered case. Western Europe was declared polio-free in 2002. But other regions have been less fortunate. Polio remains endemic in seven countries: Afghanistan, Egypt, India, Niger, Nigeria, Pakistan and Somalia. Twenty million people today are paralyzed as a result of the disease. (author's)
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  13. 13
    002470

    Curriculum and instructional materials. [Abstract-Bibliography]

    UNESCO. Regional Office for Education in Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House

    In: UNESCO. Regional Office for Asia and Oceania. Population Education Clearing House. Population education as integrated into development programs: a non-formal approach. Bangkok, Thailand, UNESCO Regional Office for Asia and Oceania, 1980. 19 p. (Series 1, Pt. 7)

    The population education documents and materials abstracted in this section focusing on curriculum and instructional materials are primarily meant for practitioners--teachers, trainers, extension workers, curriculum and material developers, whose role of disseminating population education concepts via the face-to-face approach is greatly enhanced by the use of the more impersonal forms of communication. The materials were selected to provide practitioners with a recommended list of teaching/learning tools and materials which they can use in their work. These materials come in the form of handbooks, manuals, guidebooks, packages, kits and reports. They cover all aspects of materials development, including the procedures in developing various types of materials and showing how population education concepts can be integrated into the various development themes. They also describe teaching/learning and training methods that are participatory in nature--games and simulations, role playing, problem solving, self-awareness exercises, communications sensitivity, human relations, projective exercises, programmed instructions and value clarification. In addition the abstracts provide a general summary of what curriculum areas can be used as entry points for population education concepts.
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  14. 14
    133637

    Memories of a WHO expert in midwifery.

    Bentley J

    WORLD HEALTH FORUM. 1998; 19(1):91-6.

    In this memoir, a retired World Health Organization (WHO) field worker reflects on her experiences. Her first shock came when she realized that she was going to be sent to her first assignment with no specific instructions. Fortunately, she encountered helpful WHO staff when she arrived in Manila. Conditions for delivering health care were primitive, health statistics were frightful, and working conditions were indescribable and were hampered by the lack of electricity and running water. The WHO focused on creating health services from scratch in the poorest countries and then training teachers to prepare staff. WHO nurses functioned as teams that were thrown together with no regard for compatibility. Another challenge was learning to work with national counterparts to prepare an appropriate training curriculum and to decide how students would gain experience in local hospitals, where the teaching staff was viewed with suspicion. As WHO field workers gained experience, they were able to design innovative programs, such as moving training from the classroom to a village setting. In some countries, there were numerous WHO staffers in residence, but before WHO began holding regular meetings there were few opportunities to coordinate activities. The regional office, however, maintained excellent relationships with the field staff. Being a WHO field worker meant hard, but extremely satisfying, work.
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  15. 15
    132197
    Peer Reviewed

    Integrated management of childhood illness: field test of the WHO / UNICEF training course in Arusha, United Republic of Tanzania. WHO Division of Child Health and Development and WHO Regional Office for Africa.

    Gove S; Whitesell P; Mason K; Egwaga S; Perry H; Simoes E

    BULLETIN OF THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION. 1997; 75 Suppl 1:55-64.

    The World Health Organization/UNICEF training course on the integrated management of childhood illness (IMCI) for health workers in developing countries was field tested in Arusha, Tanzania, during February-March 1995 to determine whether it could effectively prepare participants to correctly manage sick children and to suggest improvements in course materials and teaching procedures. The 11-day course was tested upon the most peripheral first-level facility health workers: 8 medical assistants, 8 rural medical aides, and 7 maternal-child health (MCH) aides. Each trainee individually examined 9-10 inpatients and managed more than 30 sick children as outpatients. While some trainees had problems reading the training modules in English, all 3 groups overall could assess, classify, and treat most sick children by the end of the course. Most were also able to provide adequate counseling. Improvements were suggested and incorporated into the course guidelines and training materials.
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  16. 16
    084742

    Improving and expanding NGO programmes.

    Mukhopadhyay A

    HEALTH FOR THE MILLIONS. 1993 Jun; 1(3):8-10.

    India has massive problems and is in need of improving and expanding non governmental organization (NGO) programs by broadening the scope of NGO activities, identifying successful NGO activities, and by moving closer to the community to participate in their activities. The problems and experience in the last few decades indicate that with expansion bureaucratization takes place. The institution begins to depend on donors and follows donor-driven agendas. As more money is given by the government, many more so called GONGO or Government-NGO projects materialize. Another problem is that the government almost always approaches the NGOs for the implementation of a project, and there is complete lack of cooperation at the planning stage. The government is considering a loan from the World Bank and UNICEF to launch a mother and child health program, but there has not been any discussion with the dozens of people who have worked on issues concerning mother and child health issues for many years. There is a need to be more demanding of the government about the various programs that are implemented for the government. Very few NGO health and family welfare projects are run by ordinary nurses or ordinary Ayurvedic doctors under ordinary conditions. Since successful NGO work has to be extended to other parts of the country, they will have to be run by ordinary people with very ordinary resources. Over the years, the NGO community has become preoccupied with its own agenda. Today, despite very sophisticated equipment and infrastructure, they are not able to reach the 60,000-70,000 workers and employees. Some of the ideas with respect to the strengthens and weaknesses of community participation have to be shared. NGOs should include all the existing non governmental organizations throughout the country, and have a dialogue with other nongovernmental bodies such as trade unions. The challenge is to adjust the current agenda, prevailing style, and present way of operating and move closer to the people.
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  17. 17
    083307

    Evaluation and policy change in UNICEF: the case of GMP.

    Pearson R

    In: Growth Promotion for Child Development. Proceedings of a colloquium held in Nyeri, Kenya, 12-13 May 1992, edited by J. Cervinskas, N.M. Gerein, and Sabu George. Ottawa, Canada, International Development Research Centre [IDRC], 1993 Feb. 33-42.

    UNICEF has been a vocal advocate of the widespread application of growth monitoring and promotion (GMP) for 10 years. The UNICEF Evaluation Office is an office within UNICEF responsible for conducting global thematic evaluations of a wide range of UNICEF activities. Evaluations involve reviewing literature, drafting terms of reference for evaluating activities in selected countries, and reviewing findings leading to policy changes for UNICEF at the global level. This paper describes progress made in conducting evaluations of GMP efforts coordinated together with UNICEF's Senior Nutrition Advisor. Data were collected for 1990-91 through focus groups and interviews in China, Ecuador, Indonesia, Malawi, Thailand, Zaire, Zambia and subsequently analyzed. A summary is presented of actions reported to have been stimulated by the assessment and analysis of anthropometric data at household and community levels and constraints to actions identified. The following lessons learned were agreed upon during a review meeting: resources are short for GMP; programs should be implemented only where there is demand; GMP should no longer be promoted as an entry point to improve the health system or other sectors; existing, poorly done GMP programs waste resources and incur large opportunity costs; promoting growth for child development is important especially where growth faltering is prevalent; program management may take several forms; inabilities to analyze and respond are primary constraints to good GMP in most country programs; GMP can promote empowerment where the context allows; and GM data should not be analyzed under the auspices of the health sector in order to avoid bias.
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  18. 18
    070620

    Organizing and managing tropical disease control programs. Lessons of success.

    Liese BH; Sachdeva PS; Cochrane DG

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1991. x, 51 p. (World Bank Technical Paper No. 159)

    A World Bank report outlines the results of an empirical study. It lists institutional characteristics connected with successful tropical disease control programs, describes their importance, and extracts useful lessons for disease control specialists and managers. The study covers and compares 7 successful tropical disease control programs: the endemic disease program in Brazil; schistosomiasis control programs in China, Egypt, and Zimbabwe; and the malaria, schistosomiasis, and tuberculosis programs in the Philippines. All of these successful programs, as defined by reaching goals over a 10-15 year period, are technology driven. Specifically they establish a relevant technological strategy and package, and use operational research to appropriately adapt it to local conditions. Further they are campaign oriented. The 7 programs steer all features of organization and management to applying technology in the field. Moreover groups of expert staff, rather than administrators, have the authority to decide on technical matters. These programs operate both vertically and horizontally. Further when it comes to planning strategy they are centralized, but when it comes to actual operations and tasks, they are decentralized. Besides they match themselves to the task and not the task to the organization. Successful disease control programs have a realistic idea of what extension activities, e.g., surveillance and health education, is possible in the field. In addition, they work with households rather than the community. All employees are well trained. Program managers use informal and professional means to motivate then which makes the programs productive. The organizational structure of these programs mixes standardization of technical procedures with flexibility in applying rules and regulations, nonmonetary rewards to encourage experience based use of technological packages, a strong sense of public service, and a strong commitment to personal and professional development.
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  19. 19
    058684

    Family planning, the Lebanese experience. A study on the Lebanese Family Planning Association.

    Iliyya S

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jul. [4], 193 p.

    As of 1984, Lebanon had not yet formulated a clear and specific population policy because laws existed against contraception and political differences among the various ethnic groups also existed which culminated in a civil war. Nevertheless the government condoned the creation of the Lebanese Family Planning Association (LFPA) in August 1969 and its activities. The government also helped spread family planning through its own institutions such as the Ministry of Health and the Office of Social Development. Further some of LFPA's staff members have been part of the government itself. LFPA conducted a survey in June 1975 in Zahrani in rural south Lebanon and it showed that the people wished to limit their fertility, but could not since birth control was not available. Therefore LFPA established the 1st Community Based Family Planning Services Program in Zahrani which later spread to other villages. Wasitas (field workers) served as the major means of providing birth control and information to the women. They emphasized child spacing. The wasitas also served as a major adaptive and indigenous agent of social change and development. Initially they underwent intensive training lasting at least 1 week, but in 1979, LFPA hosted annual 1 month training sessions. The wasitas use of traditional communication methods resulted in not only an increase of contraceptive use, but also in meeting the elemental needs of the women for psychological comfort and self reliance. In some instances, however, some wasitas resorted to deception in encouraging the most uneducated women to use birth control because of strong incentives, e.g., the wasita received 50% of the money earned for the sale of each contraceptive. LFPA needed to reassess those measures which lead to possible encroachment of the dignity and freedom of choice of the women villagers.
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  20. 20
    203057

    Improving family planning, health, and nutrition in India: experience from some World Bank-assisted programs.

    Heaver R

    Washington, D.C., The World Bank, 1989. [4], 45 p. (World Bank Discussion Papers No. 59)

    This paper looks at the experience of 3 large-scale, World Bank- assisted, outreach programs in India, and attempts to distill some lessons for the design and management of the National Family Welfare and Integrated Child Development Services programs. The 3 programs reviewed are 1) the Tamil Nadu Integrated Nutrition Project, which has halved the rate of severe malnutrition in about 9000 villages in Tamil Nadu; 2) the training and visit system of agricultural extension, being implemented in most of the major states of India and in about 40 other countries; and 3) the health component of the Calcutta Urban Development Project, which has sharply increased immunization and contraceptive prevalence rates among slum dwellers in that city. In spite of these programs being in different sectors, they have a number of design and management features in common: 1) field workers focus on a manageable number of priority tasks; 2) the ratio of clients to workers is reasonable; 3) workers are trained to follow a defined daily routine concentrating on clients most in need of services; 4) workers receive regular, in-service training complemented by regular, supportive supervision; 5) 2 of the 3 programs recruit local workers; and 6) clients are involved in implementation. Design and management improvements could be made in 1) increasing field worker productivity by concentrating on priority tasks, 2) making services more responsive to community needs and therefore increasing demand, 3) developing a national-level family planning in- service training program, and 4) initiating operations research programs in service delivery.
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  21. 21
    048973

    Draft team member contributions to mid-term evaluation of the Population and Family Planning Project (608-0171) in Morocco.

    Bouhafa M

    [Unpublished] 1988 Mar. 13 p.

    The draft team member contributions to the mid-term evaluation of the population and family planning project in Morocco examine current progress and address future needs. Increased awareness of at least 1 method of family planning was attributed to a USAID-funded project. But, problems of access, religious constraints, and lack of method-specific media campaigns need to be addressed. An increased effort to direct promotion efforts toward men is needed, as a prior immunization program showed that the husband was a key factor in encouraging mothers to bring their children to be vaccinated. Because the local health worker plays a critical role at the community level, training and support for these workers should be emphasized. Media-specific and audience-specific campaigns, by the government and private sector, should focus on the most cost-effective means of reaching the provincial level population. Donor organizations (such as UNICEF, UNFPA and USAID) should address the IEC needs identified by the central health education office, whose role and supporting functions need to be strengthened. Content of family planning materials must be method-specific, using a systematic methodology to address problems of inappropriateness, inadequate contraceptive mix, and lack of field worker training materials. Improved distribution methods for existing materials, as well as increased use of television and mass media are viable options. Using the community more effectively by encouraging leader motivation and instituting incentives could help to improve promotional and distributional activities at the provincial level. An evaluation of training needs revealed that the workshop method of training may be overemphasized, and most health workers expressed a desire for lengthened training. The private sector could be sensitized to public health issues and needs and, in conjunction with out of country technical assistance, produce effective social marketing of contraceptives within the Moroccan context. Coordination with other donors would be beneficial, with the exchange of documents and meetings between the groups.
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  22. 22
    046471

    Report on the evaluation of the UNFPA funded project on labour and family welfare education in organized sector in Zambia (September-October 1986).

    Valdivia LA; Friedman M

    Arlington, Virgina, Development Associates, 1986. iii, 71 p.

    This report evaluates the UNFPA-funded Labor and Family Welfare project in the Organized Sector of Zambia, Africa. The project targeted 3 key elements of the Organized Sector--motivation of leaders, training of educators, and in-plant workers' education. The project laid the groundwork for a major expansion of education and services at the workers' level. It has also led to a National Population Policy formulation. 18 recommendations are suggested with priority given to factory-level education and family planning service delivery. Additional funding for companies to motivate and educate workers regarding acceptance of family planning services is suggested, as well as increased training for economics, teachers, psychology teachers, and social workers to enable them to incorporate population education into their curriculums. Training activities were a major focus of the project. Increased training and educational materials about family planning, in the form of posters and handouts, should be produced and disseminated at the factory level, as well as to medical personnel. UNFPA, in accord with the Ministry of Health of Zambia, should ensure an adequate supply of contraceptives to the factories. Existing record keeping, reporting and scheduling practices should be improved, as well as the International Labor Organization (ILO) disbursement system. Short-term ILO consultants should be recruited to improve the project and its management, and 2 additional staff members, provided by the government, could help to implement the program at the plant level. 2 new vehicles should be purchased for full-time field staff to ensure availability to carry out project activities. In addition, the present accounting and recordkeeping of the ILO Lusaka office should be restructured to achieve more accurate monitoring of the use of project funds.
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  23. 23
    045499

    The lessons learnt.

    Henderson DA

    WORLD HEALTH. 1987 Aug-Sep; 8-11.

    The implications of the fact that it was concerted global effort that eradicated smallpox are discussed. The primary reason why the effort succeeded is that specific measurable goals and time deadlines were built in. The 10-year goal was met in 9 years 9 months 26 days. Universal political commitment, including provision of funds by WHO and by constituent countries, was required. A strategy of 80% vaccination and surveillance and containment of outbreaks, followed by certification of eradication, was adhered to. Whether the smallpox campaign could be used as a template for eradicating other diseases is discussed. The biology of smallpox makes it a unique candidate for eradication, while no other disease shares all of its qualifications, such as having only a human host. Lessons have been learned for control of other diseases, however. With regard to the concept of primary health care for all, the smallpox effort showed that finite, specific programs are better supported than basic health services. The eradication demonstrated the power of good leadership and common goals supported by an international institution.
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  24. 24
    045496

    Can smallpox return?

    Fenner F

    WORLD HEALTH. 1987 Aug-Sep; 18-21.

    The possibility that smallpox could be released to infect the world again is considered from the viewpoint of theoretical situations as well as the mechanisms in place to keep the virus out of circulation. Theoretically, smallpox could be stolen from a laboratory, found unknowingly in a lab freezer, manufactured for biological warfare, newly generated by mutation from another virus, emerge from the environment, or be reactivated from the system of a former victim. Laboratory sources have all been destroyed, except for cloned DNA kept in Atlanta and Moscow, which without the virus coat cannot be transmitted. There is no animal reservoir of a virus similar to smallpox. Smallpox is a type of DNA virus that has never been known to be reactivated from people who had the disease. After the publication of the Global Commission for the Certification of Smallpox Eradication in 1979, the WHO maintains an International Rumor Register in Geneva to investigate possible cases of smallpox. All suspected cases have been either chickenpox or measles. There were 2 cases in Britain in 1978 due to a laboratory accident, and 3 incidents of unwitting storage of virus in laboratory freezers. These stocks were immediately destroyed, and it is decreasingly likely that more smallpox virus will be found.
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  25. 25
    046748

    Smallpox eradication.

    Henderson DA

    PUBLIC HEALTH REPORTS. 1980 Sep-Oct; 95(5):422-6.

    The implications of the eradication of smallpox in the context of epidemiology are presented. Eradication of disease has been conceived since the 1st smallpox vaccination was developed in the 18th century. Since then, attempts to eradicate yellow fever, malaria, yaws and smallpox have been instituted. Most public health professionals have been rightfully skeptical. Indeed, the success with smallpox was fortuitous and achieved only by a narrow margin. It is unlikely that any other disease will be eradicated, lacking the perfect epidemiological characteristics and affordable technology. The key to success with smallpox was the principle of surveillance. This concept has a vigorous developmental history in the discipline of epidemiology, derived from the work of Langmuir and Farr. It involves meticulous data collection, analysis, appropriate action and evaluation. In the case of smallpox, only these techniques permitted the key observations that smallpox vaccination was remarkably durable, and that effective reporting was fundamental for success. The currently popular goal of health for all, through horizontal programs, is contrary to the methods of epidemiology because its objective is vague and meaningless, no specific management structure is envisioned, and no system of surveillance and assessment is in place.
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