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  1. 1
    044149
    Peer Reviewed

    Reduced risk of pelvic inflammatory disease with injectable contraceptives.

    Gray RH

    Lancet. 1985 May 4; 1(8436):1046.

    As part of a study on acute febrile pelvic inflammatory disease and IUDs, reported elsewhere, a significantly lower risk of PID was observed in women using injectable contraceptives. The World Health Organization coordinated the multinational case-control study in 1979-79. Diagnostic criteria were fever, suprapubic tenderness with guarding, cervical or adnexal tenderness or a pelvic mass. 319 cases and 639 matched controls were matched for age, parity, marital status and hospital status. Data were taken from questionnaires. 10 cases (3.1%) currently used injectable contraceptives, mainly Depo-Provera, compared to 38 controls (6.0%). Thus the risk of getting PID was half as great among injectable users, similar in magnitude to risks reported for women using oral contraceptives, barrier methods and sterilization in developing countries.
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  2. 2
    782755

    Contraceptive development.

    BIALY G

    CRP Population Research. 1978 Nov; 33-34.

    The Contraceptive Development Branch (CDB) program conducts research in 2 areas: 1) reproductive processes and 2) product development. Research on reproductive processes improved the understanding of gamete transport and has better identified corpus luteum functions and the role of prostaglandins. The biology and biochemistry of the ovum has been studied, and in vitro fertilization investigated. The mechanism of spermatogenesis, sperm maturation, and subsequent fertilization have been observed. Moreover, CDB has participated in the distribution of a variety of reagents to the scientific community, to stimulate research on the antipregnancy vaccine. In the area of product development, the CDB continues experimenting with the synthesis of new chemicals to regulate human fertility, the issue of safety being the primary motivation of the program. Approximately 1100 new chemicals have been synthesized and tested on laboratory animals. A drug testing program was initiated in 1972, providing feedback of biological data, and representing the major drug testing effort in the U.S. Considerable progress has been made in the area of implantable and oral contraceptives, and in the area of devices for fertility regulation, and for sexual sterilization. Clinical studies sponsored by CDB are ongoing.
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