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Your search found 8 Results

  1. 1
    066745
    Peer Reviewed

    Role of planned parenthood for enrichment of the quality of life in Sri Lanka.

    Chinnatamby S

    CEYLON MEDICAL JOURNAL. 1990 Dec; 35(4):136-42.

    The story of the Sri Lankan Family Planning movement is told from its inception in 1953, prompted by a visit by Margaret Sanger 1952. The Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka was founded with the health of women and children, and both contraception and infertility treatment as its policies. The first clinic, called the "Mothers Welfare Clinic," treated women for complications of multiparity: one woman was para 26 and had not menstruated in 33 years. The clinic distributed vaginal barriers, spermicides and condoms, but the initial continuation rate was <5% year. Sri Lanka joined the IPPF in 1954. In 1959, after training at the Worcester Foundation, and a personal visit by Pincus, the writer supervised distribution of oral contraceptives in a pilot project with 118 women for 2 years. Each pill user was seen by a physician, house surgeon, midwife, nurse and social worker. In 1958 Sweden funded family planning projects in a village and an estate that reduced the birth rate 10% in 2 years. The Sri Lankan government officially adopted a family planning policy in 1965, and renewed the bilateral agreement with Sweden for 3 years. In 1968 the government instituted an integrated family planning and maternal and child health program under its Maternal and Child Health Bureau. This was expanded in 1971 to form the Family Health Bureau, instrumental in lowering the maternal death rate from 2.4/1000 in 1965 to 0.4 in 1984. During this period IUDs, Depo Provera, Norplant, and both vasectomy and interval female sterilizations, both with 1 small incision under local anesthesia, and by laparoscopic sterilization were adopted. Remarkable results were being achieved in treating infertile copies, even from the beginning, often by merely counseling people on the proper timing of intercourse in the cycle, or offering artificial insemination of the husband's semen. Factors contributing to the success of the Sri Lankan planned parenthood program included 85% female literacy, training of health and NGO leaders, government participation, approval of religious leaders, rising age of marriage to 24 years currently, and access of all modern methods.
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  2. 2
    043987

    Laparoscopic tubal ligation under local anesthesia.

    Massouda D; Muram D

    JOURNAL OF THE TENNESSEE MEDICAL ASSOCIATION. 1986 Feb; 79(2):75-6.

    275 laparoscopic tubal ligations were done safely and economically at the Planned Parenthood of Memphis outpatient clinic from May 1983 to June 1985. Patients were carefully selected and counselled, eliminating those with previous abdominal surgery, excluding cesarean section, and those with ongoing pregnancy or serious gynecological or medical problems. The trained staff of experienced laparoscopic surgeons and certified registered nurse anesthetists practiced emergency procedures before surgery. Anesthesia was a minimal amount of nalbuphine (Nubain) 20 to 40 mg and droperidol (Inapsine) 1.25 to 2.5 mg; or fentanyl 0.1 to 0.25 mg and droperidol 1.25 to 2.5 mg; occasionally nitrous oxide inhalation. Some women received droperidol 1.25 to 2.5 mg or diazepam 2.5 to 5 mg beforehand. The laporoscopic procedure, performed through a small intraumbilical incision, employed the fallop ring. The incision was closed with 000 Dexon subcuticular sutures. There were minor side effects in 23: nausea in 20, vomiting in 2 and wound infection in 1. Two pregnancies occurred: 1 was not detected in the preliminary pregnancy test and the other was a procedure failure. The sterilization program is considered safe and resonably priced, $450 compared to $1150 to 1469 in area hospitals outpatient clinics.
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  3. 3
    011374

    [Voluntary sterilization in France and in the world] La sterilisation volontaire en France et dans le monde.

    Palmer R; Dourlen-Rollier AM; Audebert A; Geraud R

    Paris, Masson, 1981. 277 p.

    This monograph, directed not only to medical and paramedical personnel but to sterilization seekers as well, touches upon all aspects of voluntary sexual sterilization. The history of sterilization is follwed by a review of female and male anatomy and physiology, and of present available and reversible methods of contraception. All surgical, laparoscopic, tubal, electrocoagulation, culdoscopic, or hysteroscopic methods of female sterilization are described, and results, including morbidity and mortality, complication rates, side effects, and failure rates are presented. This part of the monograph is illustrated with clear and schematic drawings. Problems related to demand for reversal of sterilization are discussed. The same is done for male sterilization, its techniques and complications. The monograph discusses the ever increasing demographic problem in the world , and the role and the extent of voluntary sexual sterilization in industrialized countries and in third world countries, stressing the efforts of those international agencies, such as WHO, IPPF, the Population Council, the European Council, UNFPA, and the World Federation of Associations for Voluntary Sterilization, which promote sterilization around the world, and offer sterilization services. The authors then investigate the role of the physician in the decision to recur to sterilization as a permanent contraceptive method, and in deciding the proper surgical technique. A special chapter discusses the psychological conflicts related to sterilization, especially those which arise before the intervention, and which may very well represent the strongest contraindication to sterilization. A final chapter is devoted to France and to the sociocultural aspects which make sterilization more or less acceptable, the existing legislation, and the professional problems linked to sterilization interventions.
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  4. 4
    803773

    Female sterilization: guidelines for the development of services. 2nd ed.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1980. 47 p. (WHO Offset Publication No. 26)

    This report outlines the World Health Organization's guidelines for female sterilization techniques. The following conclusions and recommendations concerning individual techniques are discussed: 1) laparotomy, particularly immediately postpartum, is the basic sterilization technique since it can be made available in any surgically equipped facility without extra requirements. 2) minilaparotomy is more demanding in skills and training requirements. However, it is a simple procedure on outpatient basis which makes it suitable for large-scale programs. 3) Colpotomy requires specialized training in obstetrics and gynecology. It has the same advantages as minilaparotomy, but it cannot be used postpartum. 4) Laparoscopy is the most complex sterilization form, and the most expensive. It can be used for sterilization, but its primary role is in diagnosis. 5) Culdoscopy costs slightly less than laparoscopy but has all of the same limitations as laparsocopic method (i.e., expensive, sophisticated university of facilities and training. 6) Hysterectomy is not recommended for sterilization. The need for adequate counseling services in addition to technical expertise is underlined.
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  5. 5
    773960

    Guide to equipment selection for M/F sterilization procedures. Guide du materiel utilise pour les procedures de sterilisation des hommes et des femmes.

    Reingold LA

    Population Reports. Series M: Special Topics. 1977 Sep; (1):[36] p.

    This is a guide to aid in selecting and maintaining the proper equipment used in the following sterilization procedures: 1) minilaparotomy, 2) laparoscopy, 3) conventional laparotomy, 4) colpotomy, 5) culdoscopy, and 6) vasectomy. Prototype, experimental, or infrequently used instruments are not discussed. Colpotomy, minilaparotomy, and conventional vasectomy are low-technology procedures requiring relatively simple, locally produced instruments, e.g., retractors, forceps, and scalpels. High-technology equipment consists of specialized items, e.g., laparoscopes and culdoscopes. These are produced in a limited number of technically advanced countries. Equipment donor agencies are discussed. The following factors must be considered in selecting equipment: 1) suitability for the intended procedures, 2) quality of the instrument, 3) ease of repair, and 4) initial cost. Each type of equipment is pictured, diagrammed, described, and charted against others of its kind. Maintenance and repair guidelines are provided.
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  6. 6
    755662

    Report on our observation trip to Thailand about Depo-Provera and mini-lap.

    VAN DER BLUGT G

    [Unpublished] 1975. 21 p.

    Depo-Provera has not been used on a widespread basis in the Philippines because the Federal Drug Administration has not approved it, and a large share of their family planning budget is funded by USAID. Although Governor Luiz made Depo-Provera available to 800 acceptors; it was too expensive to compete with free contraceptives. On a trip to Thailand Governor Luiz witnessed the long-term effects of a Depo-Provera program begun in 1965: fewer children and better living conditions. Laparoscopy is too expensive an operation in training and instruments required to be used in the Philippines. Mini-lap is effective and inexpensive. A Thai doctor taught a Philippine doctor the procedure in only 2 operations. The Philippine doctor can train many others quickly, and equipment can be manufactured locally.
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  7. 7
    735549

    Conclusions and recommendations of the IPPF Central Medical Committee (CMC) and its panel of experts on sterilization.

    Keinman RL

    In: Kleinman, R.L., ed. Male and female sterilization. A report of the meeting of the IPPF Panel of Experts on Sterilization, Bombay, January 11-14, 1973. London, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1973. p. 8-12

    The conclusions and recommendations fall into 3 categories, i.e., policy, administrative and technical. Important points in the 1st category include; that sterilization be available and avilable on request, that it be voluntary, and that facilities for reversal procedures be free and avilable. Administrave recommendations include; that no arbitrary hospital stay be assinged to vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy patients, that no arbitrary selection criteria concerning previous training or surgical skill be used in accepting personnel for vasectomy training, and that endoscopic techniques should not be done without an anesthetist. Among the technical recommendations were: that postpartum sterilization under local anesthesia by laparotomy be encouraged, as that is the simplest of all female procedures; taht vaginal procedures should only be done with proper operative and anathestic facilities; that division of the uteirne tubes by the Pomeroy technique using 0 chromic catgut should be employed in mass programs of female sterilization; the removal of part of the uterine tube for biopsy and histological examination as a check on the success of the operation should not be done; general anesthesia should never be used for a simple vasectomy unless there are complications; and that tetanus toxoid should not be given to avoid infection.
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  8. 8
    022392

    AID support of laparoscopy overseas: 1973-1983.

    Wiley AT; Speidel JJ

    [Unpublished] [1983]. 12 p.

    In 1972 the US Agency for International Development (USAID) began to provide funds to Johns Hopkins and other universities to train developing country personnel in laparoscopic sterilization technique. The demand for this training and AID's perceived need for a mechanism to provide developing country doctors with current training in family planning and other aspects of reproductive health led, in 1974, to the creation of the Johns Hopkins Program for International Education in Gynecology and Obstetrics (JHPIEGO). One of its purposes was to provide short-term training in laparoscopy for overseas physicians and to arrange for distribution and maintenance of laparoscopic equipment. JHPIEGO was also conceived of as a broad based program for training in reproductive health emphasizing the important role that family planning plays in reproductive health. Most of this USAID supported training now takes place in medical centers in the developing countries. The training usually consists of 2-4 weeks of didactic and clinical work in many aspects of reproductive health of which training in laparoscopy is often an important part. After the laparoscopic training, each qualifying trainee is visited at his/her own hospital by a consultant who helps set up the laparoscopic equipment for use. A significant number of supervised laparoscopic procedures are then performed by the trainee over a period of several days. When the consultant trainer is satisfied with the skill of the particular trainee, a laparoscopic unit is given to the trainee's institution. By September 1983, 2500 physicians from approximately 100 countries had received this type of JHPIEGO training, and more than 1600 of them have since been provided with laparoscopies at their home institutions. USAID funded laparoscopic training and equipment and other types of training and equipment also have been provided to the developing countries by the Association for Voluntary Sterilization (AVS). These 2 groups have now cumulatively provided laparoscopic training for at least 3800 physicians from developing countries. The Falope Ring applicator is now in use throughout the world, and JHPIEGO and AVS have converted their overseas laparoscopes to include this capability and for the past 5 years all laparoscopes supplied by USAID have had this Falope Ring capability. The laprocator, a simplified laparoscope which is designed for use of the Falope Ring, was developed in response to USAID's interest in lowering costs and maintenance requirements. USAID has provided over 1000 of these simplified systems to more than 75 developing countries. The use of laparoscopy in the voluntary sterilization programs of the Philippines, in India, and in Africa are reviewed. Voluntary sterilization has grown each year in popularity and is now the method of birth control in most widespread use around the world.
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