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    006292

    Country case study: Korea.

    Kim TI; Cho NH

    In: Jain SC, Kanagaratnam K, Paul JE, ed. Management development in population programs. Chapel Hill, University of North Carolina, School of Public Health, Dept. of Health Administration and Carolina Population Center, 1981. 113-51.

    This case study examines the management development aspect of the Korean national family planning program which was initially adopted in 1962. The nation's goal in the 1st 10 years of the program was to reduce the rate of population growth from 2.9-2.0%. Subsequent targets were established to reduce the growth rate to 1.5% by 1976 and 1.3% by 1981. Recent census figures indicate that these latter figures were not reached. The total fertility rate declined from 6.0 in 1960 to 2.7 in 1978, a 55% decline. The age specific fertility rate also declined except for women between 25-29 years of age. Program costs during the last 18 years totaled about $126.7 million; 80% of these funds came from the government and the rest from foreign assistance. 3811 full time employees were engaged in the program in 1979; 4.9% at the central level, 8.1% at the provincial level, and 87% at the urban and county level. 69% are considered family planning workers. Between 1962-79, 6.1 million cumulative acceptors have received contraceptive services. The IUD was the principal method of contraception until 1976 when female sterilization services were introduced. The contraceptive practice rate has increased from 9-49% between 1964-78. Organization of the program is structured on a national, provincial, and local basis. Assessment of the program indicates that there has been success but the following problems still remain in the, 1) rural oriented program structure, 2) high discontinuation rates of contraceptive usage and inadequate follow-up, 3) high turnover of field workers, 4) difficulties in using local civil administration services, 5) poor quality research, 6) weak management training, and 7) poor relationships among special projects. Other program management problems exist in planning, resource allocation, training, use of private clinics, coordination, interagency coordination, program supervision, recording systems, and overall program evaluation. Emphasis is placed on the operational and managerial capacity of the program managers to successfully implement family planning programs. Improvements in the current managerial system and the role of international agencies are discussed.
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