Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 4 Results

  1. 1
    322363

    Ethical concerns in female genital cutting [editorial]

    Cook RJ

    African Journal of Reproductive Health. 2008 Apr; 12(1):7-11.

    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    314836
    Peer Reviewed

    Africa battles to make female genital mutilation history.

    Wakabi W

    Lancet. 2007 Mar 31; 369(9567):1069-1070.

    During the past 2 years, substantial progress has been made in changing attitudes towards female genital mutilation in countries such as Guinea, Egypt, Tanzania, Kenya, and Senegal. But the practice remains widespread across Africa. Wairagala Wakabi reports. In Guinea, where 97% of all women undergo female genital mutilation, about 150 communities made a declaration to collectively abandon the practice at the beginning of this year. Attitudes towards the harmful procedure are also changing in other countries in Africa such as Egypt, Tanzania, Kenya, and Senegal. But despite this growing momentum against the practice, it is still prevalent in these countries and it remains widespread in at least 28 countries on the continent. Poor education and low levels of income among women in African countries, coupled with inadequate governmental support in efforts to eradicate the practice, mean it will take longer to stamp out. Human rights activists place much of the blame for slow progress at the door of governments. "The struggle to have communities in Africa abandon female genital mutilation is taking too long because it's only civil society who have taken it seriously. Governments are yet to take up the matter to the expected level", says Faiza Mohamed, Africa regional director of women rights group Equality Now, which works with 23 organisations in 16 African countries. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    286929

    U.N. report sees advances in reproductive rights; says more needs to be done.

    Population 2005. 2002 Mar-Apr; 4(1):1, 8-10.

    Significant legal and policy provisions and improved access to information have helped women and adolescents in many countries to become aware of their reproductive rights and make informed choices about childbearing. This has resulted in more people in the world using family planning today than ever before. Yet, millions of women still become pregnant before they expect to and have more children than they want, the United Nations says in a report. "Today’s adolescents have far more choices than their parents had. Access to basic education, especially for girls, offers new opportunities for work, careers, and higher education," according to the World Population Monitoring report prepared by the UN Population Division. Education also enables young people to obtain the necessary information to make "responsible and informed choices and decisions regarding their sexual and reproductive health needs," says the report presented at the 35th session of the United Nations Commission on Population and Development in New York in the first week of April. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    183433

    Female rites of passage: Cameroon and female genital mutilation; time for change.

    Tabe M

    Tampa, Florida, Female Genital Cutting Education and Networking Project, 2001 Dec 28. 4 p.

    This is testimony from a twenty five year-old woman who has elected to stay anonymous. She is today living in Douala where to cam a living she is a prostitute. Two national surveys carried out in Cameroon between 1988 and 1999 have shown that many girls and women have undergone one form of female genital mutilation (FGM) or the other and a lot more are at the risk of the practice. The negative effects of FGM on the health of women and girls have contributed to maternal morbidity and mortality, and traumatic psychological and psychosexual effects. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.