Your search found 40 Results

  1. 1
    337896

    Position statement on condoms and the prevention of HIV, other sexually transmitted infections and unintended pregnancy.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]; World Health Organization [WHO]; Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    [Geneva, Switzerland], UNAIDS, 2015 Jul 7. [8] p.

    Condoms are a critical component in a comprehensive and sustainable approach to the prevention of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and are effective for preventing unintended pregnancies. Male and female condoms are the only devices that both reduce the transmission of HIV and other sexually transmitted infections (STIs) and prevent unintended pregnancy. Condoms have played a decisive role in HIV, STI and pregnancy prevention efforts in many countries. Condoms remain a key component of high-impact HIV prevention programmes. Quality-assured condoms must be readily available universally, either free or at low cost. Programmes promoting condoms must address stigma and gender-based and socio-cultural factors that hinder effective access and use of condoms. Adequate investment in and further scale up of condom promotion is required to sustain responses to HIV, other STIs, and unintended pregnancy. (Excerpts)
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    361400
    Peer Reviewed

    Silencing women's sexuality: global AIDS policies and the case of the female condom.

    Peters AJ; van Driel FT; Jansen WH

    Journal of the International AIDS Society. 2013; 16(1):18452.

    Introduction: The female condom is the only evidence-based AIDS prevention technology that has been designed for the female body; yet, most women do not have access to it. This is remarkable since women constitute the majority of all HIV-positive people living in sub-Saharan Africa, and gender inequality is seen as a driving force of the AIDS epidemic. In this study, we analyze how major actors in the AIDS prevention field frame the AIDS problem, in particular the female condom in comparison to other prevention technologies, in their discourse and policy formulations. Our aim is to gain insight into the discursive power mechanisms that underlie the thinking about AIDS prevention and women's sexual agency. Methods: We analyze the AIDS policies of 16 agencies that constitute the most influential actors in the global response to AIDS. Our study unravels the discursive power of these global AIDS policy actors, when promoting and making choices between AIDS prevention technologies. We conducted both a quantitative and qualitative analysis of how the global AIDS epidemic is being addressed by them, in framing the AIDS problem, labelling of different categories of people for targeting AIDS prevention programmes and in gender marking of AIDS prevention technologies. Results: We found that global AIDS policy actors frame the AIDS problem predominantly in the context of gender and reproductive health, rather than that of sexuality and sexual rights. Men's sexual agency is treated differently from women's sexual agency. An example of such differentiation and of gender marking is shown by contrasting the framing and labelling of male circumcision as an intervention aimed at the prevention of HIV with that of the female condom. Conclusions: The gender-stereotyped global AIDS policy discourse negates women's agency in sexuality and their sexual rights. This could be an important factor in limiting the scale-up of female condom programmes and hampering universal access to female condoms.
    Add to my documents.
  3. 3
    345672
    Peer Reviewed

    The female condom: the international denial of a strong potential.

    Peters A; Jansen W; van Driel F

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2010 May; 18(35):119-28.

    The female condom has received surprisingly little serious attention since its introduction in 1984. Given the numbers of women with HIV globally, international support for women's reproductive and sexual health and rights and the empowerment of women, and, not least, due to the demand expressed by users, one would have expected the female condom to be widely accessible 16 years after it first appeared. This expectation has not materialised; instead, the female condom has been marginalised in the international response to HIV and AIDS. This paper asks why and analyses the views and actions of users, providers, national governments and international public policymakers, using an analytical framework specifically designed to evaluate access to new health technologies in poor countries. We argue that universal access to female condoms is not primarily hampered by obstacles on the users' side, as is often alleged, nor by unwilling governments in developing countries, but that acceptability of the female condom is problematic mainly at the international policy level. This view is based on an extensive review of the literature, interviews with representatives of UNAIDS, UNFPA and other organisations, and a series of observations made during the International AIDS Conference in Mexico in August 2008. Copyright 2010 Reproductive Health Matters. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
    Add to my documents.
  4. 4
    331842

    Donor support for contraceptives and condoms for STI / HIV prevention 2008.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    [New York, New York], UNFPA, 2008. 30 p.

    Since 1990, the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) has been tracking donor support for contraceptives and condoms for STI / HIV prevention. The Fund publishes an annual report based on this donor database to enhance the coordination among partners at all levels to continue progress toward universal access to sexual and reproductive health, as set forth in the ICPD Programme of Action and, subsequently, the Millennium Development Goals. This report represents the 2008 installment of the series and has three main sections. The first section summarizes patterns and trends—by method, by donor and by region—in donor support from 2000-2008. The second section takes a closer look at donor support for male and female condoms over time and by region. The third and final section compares aggregate donor support to global contraceptive need for 2000-2008 and provides projections of contraceptive needs through 2015. (Excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  5. 5
    331707

    Can the female condom be used safely more than once?

    Family Health International [FHI]

    [Research Triangle Park, North Carolina], FHI, [2007]. [3] p. (FHI Research Briefs on the Female Condom No. 3)

    The female condom is more expensive than the male condom. If the female condom can be used safely more than once, the cost of each use would decline. Studies have found that the device remains structurally sound after repeated washings and reuse, and that a one-minute soak in a 1-to-20 dilution of bleach in water effectively inactivates the organisms that cause gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes, and HIV infections. The World Health Organization (WHO) continues to recommend the use of a new male or female condom for every act of sexual intercourse where there is risk of an unplanned pregnancy or of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection, but WHO also stated in July 2002 that "the final decision on whether or not to support reuse of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally." Because some women may not have access to bleach, USAID supported additional research to assess the safety and feasibility of cleaning used female condoms with soap and water and eliminating the bleach disinfection step. One study, conducted by FHI, tested a solution of dish detergent and water based on volumes typically used to wash dishes: 7.5 milliliters of detergent per one liter of water, or about two squirts of detergent in a basin of water. It found that the dish detergent and water was just as effective as the 1:20 bleach solution in removing the organisms that cause gonorrhea, chlamydia, herpes and HIV infection from the surfaces of both new and pre-washed, relubricated condoms.
    Add to my documents.
  6. 6
    327323

    Prevention is for life. HIV / AIDS: dispatches from the field.

    Leidl P; Gharzeddine O; Ngwa G; Olfarnes T; Plews A

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2008]. 48 p.

    This advocacy booklet provides real-life examples to illustrate how HIV prevention can save lives in diverse cultural and geographical settings. It includes chapters on youth and HIV, promoting and distributing male and female condoms, protecting women and girls, linking HIV prevention with other sexual and reproductive health care, and empowering populations who are at particular risk. The booklet features stories from Belize, China, Egypt, Ethiopia, Nigeria, the Russian Federation, and Tajikistan.
    Add to my documents.
  7. 7
    322624

    Improving women's health.

    Directions in Global Health. 2007 Sep; 4(2):1-11.

    The health of women in the developing world is a growing priority for the global community. We are increasingly aware of women's vulnerability to AIDS and other diseases-and the cultural factors that can reduce their opportunities to live healthy lives. At the same time, there is ever-greater recognition of women's enormous influence on the health and well-being of their communities. PATH has been a front-runner in the race to offer women better health solutions since our first project, in the late 1970s-helping manufacturers in China set up facilities for producing high-quality condoms and other contraceptives. Today PATH's work extends across the spectrum of women's health. The projects highlighted in this issue of Directions range from better care for mothers and infants to new options for woman-initiated protection against HIV to programs that help give women an equal chance at a healthy life. We anticipate that over the next decade, the investment in women among PATH and organizations like us will only continue to deepen. When women are healthy, so are their families and communities-the starting point for a stronger, more stable world. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  8. 8
    314631

    Prevention is for life. Strengthening, streamlining and scaling up efforts.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [2006]. [2] p.

    Each year, more people are living with HIV than the year before. And each year, more people die of AIDS. This growing global tragedy has many faces: The desperation of a teenage orphan struggling to care for her younger siblings by trading sexual favours for food; The sorrow of a young mother who learns she is HIV-positive at a prenatal clinic; The anguish of an unemployed youth who fears he has acquired HIV, but has no access to counselling, testing or condoms. In the absence of a cure, HIV prevention offers the best hope of reversing the epidemic. Prevention works. Sustained political commitment through intensive programmes in diverse settings has reduced HIV incidence. Advances in treatment are reinforcing prevention efforts by encouraging voluntary testing and reducing the stigma associated with AIDS. Nevertheless, the pandemic is outstripping efforts to contain it and is gaining ground globally. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  9. 9
    311654

    Second generation female condom available [letter]

    Nakari T

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2006 Nov; 14(28):179.

    The female condom has been on the market for over ten years but despite a clear need it has not yet been adopted for wider use. In 2005 only 14 million female condoms were distributed compared to 6-9 billion male condoms around the world. However, studies in many countries have shown that the female condom is well accepted among both women and men, and that there is demand for it. One of the problems in achieving its widespread distribution in national programmes has been its cost. In an effort to address the problem of cost, the Female Health Company has developed a second generation female condom, FC2. This new version of the female condom has similar physical characteristics to the original female condom but is made of synthetic nitrile utilising a manufacturing process which allows greater efficiencies, particularly at higher volumes. The new device has been shown in studies to be equivalent to the original female condom and has the potential for wider acceptability and utilisation since it is expected to be more affordable for individuals and programmes. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  10. 10
    303288

    Sex and youth: contextual factors affecting risk for HIV / AIDS.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1999 May. 145 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection. Key material; UNAIDS/99.26E)

    Since early in the epidemic, enquiry into the factors influencing HIV-related vulnerability has been recognized as essential for prevention efforts. While much early work focused on the individual determinants of sexual and drug-related risk-taking, increasingly the contextual factors which render some groups more vulnerable than others has come to be recognized. Factors as diverse as age, gender, social position, economic status, cultural norms, beliefs and expectations determine the risks faced, and enable and constrain individuals in their actions. It is now widely recognized that both individual persuasion and social enablement are essential for programme success, and increasing numbers of prevention programmes and activities are designed on this assumption. The recent UNAIDS report Expanding the Global Response to HIV/AIDS Through Focused Action recognizes the importance of such an approach and seeks to encourage its application in countries across the world. Yet knowing how to develop and fine-tune programmes requires insight into the often complex determinants of behaviour in specific cultural settings and contexts. Good quality social enquiry has a key role to play in providing this information and in supporting the development of work that is attuned to the needs of particular groups. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  11. 11
    300924

    The female condom and AIDS: UNAIDS point of view.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]

    Geneva, Switzerland, UNAIDS, 1997 Apr. 7 p. (UNAIDS Best Practice Collection; UNAIDS Point of View)

    A woman's equivalent of the traditional condom seems a simple idea, yet the "female condom" (worn within the vagina rather than on the penis) has been around for less than a decade. Available in an increasing number of countries around the world, it offers great promise for reducing the spread of HIV and AIDS. Cheap and reliable, the traditional condom (or male condom) is used by millions all over the world to avoid pregnancies. Until recently, it has also been the only barrier method for preventing the passing of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), including HIV, between two sex partners. Used correctly every time people have sex, it is over 95% effective against the transmission of HIV. The fact that the condom prevents transmission of other STDs such as syphilis or gonorrhoea is of additional importance to the fight against HIV and AIDS because people who have another STD are more vulnerable to being infected by HIV. The traditional condom is not the perfect method for everyone, however. For example, many couples dislike having to interrupt sex in order for a man to put one on. Up to 8% of people are allergic to latex, the main ingredient in most condoms. And many feel that it dulls sexual pleasure. In family planning programmes, it has been proven that a wider choice of contraceptive methods results in fewer pregnancies. The same has been found in testing of the female condom: adding this new option for protected sex results in fewer cases of unprotected sex. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  12. 12
    299738

    Can the female condom be used safely more than once?

    Family Health International [FHI]

    [Research Triangle Park, North Carolina], FHI, 2005. [4] p. (FHI Research Briefs on the Female Condom No. 3:)

    The female condom is currently approved by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration for one-time use. Some experts believe that if safe reuse were possible, it could reduce the device's cost to users and result in more protected sex acts. Female condom reuse has been reported in a number of countries, particularly in resource-poor settings. Although the World Health Organization (WHO) does not recommend or promote the device's reuse, WHO stated in July 2002 that "... the final decision on whether or not to support reuse of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally." WHO continues to recommend the use of a new male or female condom for every act of sexual intercourse where there is risk of unplanned pregnancy or of acquiring a sexually transmitted infection (STI), such as HIV. Acknowledging that some women may not have access to new female condoms, however, WHO has also developed a protocol for cleaning and handling female condoms so that they can be reused safely. A single female condom may be used up to five times, provided that after each use, it is cleaned and handled according to WHO guidelines, the protocol states. The protocol contains a disinfection step that involves soaking the device for one minute in a 1-to-20 dilution of bleach (sodium hypochlorite) to water as soon as possible after use. The device must then be washed, dried, stored, and re-lubricated prior to next use following protocol procedures. This protocol only applies to the polyurethane female condom manufactured by the Female Health Company. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  13. 13
    291914

    Condom programming for HIV prevention.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 2002 Jun. 6 p. (HIV Prevention Now Programme Briefs No. 6)

    Condoms are universally recognized as one of the most effective ways to prevent HIV and other sexually transmitted infections. Condom programming is an integral component of a range of HIV prevention strategies that includes informed, responsible and safer sexual behaviour through voluntary abstinence, delayed age of onset of sexual activity, fidelity, and condom use. Neither male nor female condoms, however, are being optimally employed in the fight to prevent STIs/HIV. Condom programming for HIV prevention is a strategic approach to ensure that sexually active persons at risk of STIs/HIV are motivated to use condoms, have access to quality condoms, and can use them consistently and correctly. Achieving sufficient magnitude to impact the HIV pandemic requires full mobilization of political will and resources, and overcoming institutional, community, and individual barriers to access and use of condoms. User needs and perspectives are at the heart of effective condom programming for STI/HIV prevention. As both a condom supplier and an agency with considerable experience in sexual and reproductive health, UNFPA has identified condom programming as one of its 3 core areas of focus for HIV prevention, along with young people and pregnant women for whom condom use is essential for effective STI/HIV prevention. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  14. 14
    277228

    The female condom: opportunities and challenges in South Asia.

    Usmani F

    Kathmandu, Nepal, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], Country Technical Services Team for South and West Asia, 2002 Sep. 32 p. (Technical Paper No. 3_CST-KTM/ HIV/AIDS/02)

    Evidence from throughout the world underscores women's disproportionate and growing vulnerability to HIV infection. The table below on estimated number of young people -male and female-living with HIV/AIDS in South Asia shows that in India, where HIV prevalence is highest in the region, nearly double the number of young women are estimated be living with HIV/AIDS as compared to young men. Trends indicate that the rate of new infections of HIV is highest among women/young girls in the region. In Nepal, for example, the ratio of women infected by HIV has increased and these latest July 2002 estimates give nearly equal numbers of young men and women infected today. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  15. 15
    192147

    WHO information update: Considerations regarding reuse of the female condom.

    World Health Organization [WHO]. Department of Reproductive Health and Research

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, Department of Reproductive Health and Research, 2002 Jul. [4] p.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends use of a new male or female condom for every act of intercourse where there is a risk of unplanned pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted infection, including HIV. Since access to female condoms may be limited and reuse of female condoms has been reported, WHO has convened two consultations to address considerations regarding such reuse. Based on these consultations, WHO does not recommend or promote reuse of female condoms. Recognizing the urgent need for risk-reduction strategies for women who cannot or do not access new condoms, the consultation developed a draft protocol for safe handling and preparation of female condoms intended for reuse. This protocol is based on the best available evidence, but has not been extensively studied for safety and has not been evaluated for efficacy in human use. Given the diversity of cultural and social contexts and personal circumstances under which female condom reuse may be acceptable, feasible and safe, and since the balance of risks and benefits varies according to individual settings, the final decision on whether or not to support reuse of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally. WHO continues to support research on female condom reuse and will disseminate relevant information, study results and guidelines for policy makers as additional data on reuse become available. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  16. 16
    278102
    Peer Reviewed

    Considerations regarding re-use of the female condom: information update, 10 July 2002.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Reproductive Health Matters. 2002; 10(20):182-186.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) recommends use of a new male or female condom for every act of intercourse where there is a risk of unplanned pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted infection, including HIV. Since access to female condoms may be limited and re-use of female condoms has been reported, WHO has convened two consultations to address considerations regarding such re-use. Based on these consultations, WHO does not recommend or promote re-use of female condoms. Recognizing the urgent need for risk-reduction strategies for women who cannot or do not access new condoms, the consultation developed a draft protocol for safe handling and preparation of female condoms intended for re-use. This protocol, outlined in this paper, is based on the best available evidence, but has not yet been extensively studied for safety or evaluated for efficacy in human use. Given the diversity of cultural and social contexts and personal circumstances under which female condom re-use may be acceptable, feasible and safe, and since the balance of risks and benefits varies according to individual settings, the final decision on whether or not to support re-use of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally. WHO continues to support research on female condom re-use and will disseminate relevant information, study results and guidelines for policy makers as additional data on re-use become available. (author's)
    Add to my documents.
  17. 17
    185712

    Female condom reuse issues explored.

    Smith EJ

    Network. 2003; 22(4):11.

    For female condom users, use of a new female condom for every act of sexual intercourse continues to be recommended by the World Health Organization (WHO). Likewise, the female condom (a potential alternative for the male condom) is approved only for one-time use by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Such positions by public health experts reflect, in part, concerns that women may be unable to clean the device adequately to make its reuse safe. However, female condom reuse has been reported in a number of settings, likely because many women cannot afford to buy multiple female condoms. Recognition that reuse is occurring -- and may be acceptable, feasible, and safe in some circumstances -- led WHO to declare in July 2002 that "the final decision on whether or not to support reuse of the female condom must ultimately be taken locally." (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  18. 18
    182806

    The safety and feasibility of female condom reuse: report of a WHO consultation, 28-29 January 2002, Geneva.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2002. [3], 15 p.

    According to the recommendations of the first consultation, this second meeting (January 2002) was planned to review the resulting data and to develop further guidance on the safety of reuse of the female condom. The specific objectives and anticipated outcomes of this second consultation were to: Review the results and evaluate the implications of the recently completed microbiology and structural integrity experiments and the human use study; Develop a protocol or set of instructions for disinfecting and cleaning used female condoms safely; Outline future research areas and related issues for programme managers to consider when determining the balance of risks and benefits of female condom reuse in various contexts and settings. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  19. 19
    174266

    WHO pronouncement on the reuse of female condoms.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Progress in Reproductive Health Research. 2002; (59):5.

    WHO recommends use of a new male or female condom for every act of intercourse where there is a risk of unplanned pregnancy and/or sexually transmitted infection, including HIV and, based on two expert consultations, does not recommend or promote reuse of female condoms. (excerpt)
    Add to my documents.
  20. 20
    150029

    Prophylaxis. Female condom "dream come true for Ghanaians".

    AIDS WEEKLY. 2000 Jun 12-19; 18-9.

    This article reports the launch of the female condom by the Female Health Co. in Ghana on May 25, 2000. The development of this project has been assisted by a guide "The Female Condom: A Guide for Planning and Programming", that highlights the importance of training and communications to support the introduction of female condoms.
    Add to my documents.
  21. 21
    127391

    The female condom: questions and answers.

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction; World Health Organization [WHO]. Reproductive Health Technical Support / Family Planning and Population

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1997 Apr. [4] p.

    The female condom is a thin, strong, soft, transparent polyurethane sheath which lines the vagina to create a barrier against sperm and sexually transmitted microorganisms. A ring at the closed end is used for insertion and helps to maintain the device at the upper end of the vagina. A larger and thinner outer ring remains outside of the vagina when the condom is inserted, anchoring the condom so that the sheath covers the external genitalia and the base of the penis during intercourse. The female condom can be used by women of all ages, is prelubricated with a nonspermicidal silicone fluid, intended for single use, nonbiodegradable, and inserted manually into the vagina at any time before intercourse and removed afterwards. It is the only method other than the male condom which provides protection against both STD/HIV and unplanned pregnancy. Laboratory studies have shown the female condom blocks the passage of STDs, including HIV, and use-effectiveness studies have found an accidental pregnancy rate of 15-25% over a 1-year period of method use. The female condom has no side effects for most people and does not need to be provided by health care personnel.
    Add to my documents.
  22. 22
    127392

    The female condom: how can it be made available?

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction; World Health Organization [WHO]. Reproductive Health Technical Support / Family Planning and Population

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1997 Apr. [2] p.

    The female condom is the only method of protection against both pregnancy and sexually transmitted disease (STD) infection which women can use on their own. Offering such dual protection, the female condom needs to be made available as part of both family planning and STD services. Program managers need to consider issues of advocacy, availability, access, training, and information in their attempts to ensure the appropriate provision of the female condom. From the earliest phase of female condom introduction, information must be provided to decision makers, program managers, service providers, community leaders, and women's and youth groups. Those groups should be involved in planning the introduction of the method. People need to be aware of what the product is and where it is available. Efforts must then be made to ensure that the female condom will be available and accessible on a long-term basis. People who will provide the female condom need to be trained in its use, efficacy, and how to help women negotiate its use with their partners. Both men and women need to know about the effectiveness, safety, and correct use and disposal of the female condom.
    Add to my documents.
  23. 23
    127393

    The female condom: Why is it important?

    Joint United Nations Programme on HIV / AIDS [UNAIDS]; World Health Organization [WHO]. Special Programme of Research, Development and Research Training in Human Reproduction; World Health Organization [WHO]. Reproductive Health Technical Support / Family Planning and Population

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 1997 Apr. [2] p.

    Between 1990 and 1995, the proportion of HIV infections in women increased from 25% to 45%. While sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) affect both men and women, they more often more seriously affect women. The female condom is a strong, soft, transparent sheath which lines the vagina to create a barrier against sperm and sexually transmitted microorganisms. It is the only method other than the male condom which provides protection against both STD/HIV and unplanned pregnancy. The female condom has no side effects and does not need to be provided by health care personnel. The 1994 International Conference on Population and Development and the Fourth World Conference on Women called for more attention to providing women with the means of preventing the transmission of STDs, including HIV, as well as unintended pregnancy. Proper use of the female condom can achieve these objectives. The World Health Organization and UNAIDS are helping countries introduce the female condom. This document is intended to help advocate and promote the method.
    Add to my documents.
  24. 24
    171221

    UNAIDS and WHO report acknowledges importance of female condom in HIV / AIDS prevention.

    Two-Ten Communications

    London, England, Two-Ten Communications, 1995 Nov 28. 1 p.

    This press release reports that the Female Health Company has signed a 3-year agreement with the Joint UN Programme on HIV/AIDS to provide a global public sector price for the female condom. A major adjunct to the agreement is the launch of an intensive education and social marketing program that is vital to securing acceptance and correct usage of this revolutionary product.
    Add to my documents.
  25. 25
    170442
    Peer Reviewed

    The challenge of introducing the female condom for dual protection. [Desafío de introducir el preservativo femenino para la protección doble]

    Warren M; Morris C

    Sexual Health Exchange. 2002; (2):9-10.

    In 1997, the Female Health Company (FHC) launched the female condom. Since then, FHC has gained considerable experience introducing this new product worldwide. A wide range of acceptability studies and field projects in many different countries, and social and economic settings have shown that the female condom is acceptable to a number of women and men. However, translating this acceptability into protected sex acts remains a major challenge. Based on lessons learned from pilot projects in 17 countries, FHC and Marie Stopes International recently initiated a new female condom introduction strategy in a number of Latin American countries. (author's)
    Add to my documents.

Pages