Your search found 20 Results

  1. 1
    030964

    The state of the world's women 1985: World Conference to Review and Appraise the Achievements of the United Nations Decade for Women, Equality, Development and Peace, Nairobi, Kenya, July 15-26, 1985.

    New Internationalist Publications

    [Unpublished] 1985. 19 p.

    This report, based on results of a questionnaire completed by 121 national governments as well as independent research by UN agencies, assesses the status of the world's women at the end of the UN Decade for Women in the areas of the family, agriculture, industrialization, health, education, and politics. Women are estimated to perform 2/3 of the world's work, receive 1/10 of its income and own less than 1/100 of its property. The findings revealed that women do almost all the world's domestic work, which combined with their additional work outside the home means that most women work a double day. Women grow about 1/2 the world's food but own very little land, have difficulty obtaining credit, and are overlooked by agricultural advisors and projects. Women constitute 1/3 of the world's official labor force but are concentrated in the lowest paid occupations and are more vulnerable to unemployment than men. Although there are signs that the wage gap is closing slightly, women still earn less than 3/4 of the wage of men doing similar work. Women provide more health care than do health services, and have been major beneficiaries of the global shift in priorities to primary health care. The average number of children desired by the world's women has dropped from 6 to 4 in 1 generation. Although a school enrollment boom is closing the gap between the sexes, women illiterates outnumber men by 3 to 2. 90% of countries now have organizations promoting the advancement of women, but women are still greatly underrepresented in national decision making because of their poorer educations, lack of confidence, and greater workload. The results repeatedly point to the major underlying cause of women's inequality: their domestic role of wife and mother, which consumes about 1/2 of their time and energy, is unpaid, and is undervalued. The emerging picture of the importance and magnitude of the roles women play in society has been reflected in growing concern for women among governments and the community at large, and is responsible for the positive achievements of the decade in better health care and more employment and educational opportunities. Equality for women will require that they have equal rights, responsibilities, and opportunities in every area of life.
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  2. 2
    273060

    The world population plan of action and the Mexico draft recommendations: analytical comparisons and index.

    United Nations. Department of Internation Economic and Social Affairs. Population Division

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jul 23. 136 p. (ESA/P/WP/85)

    This document, prepared primarily for use within the UN Secretariat, systematically compares the recommendtions of the World Population Plan of Action (WPPA) and the Mexico Draft recommendations for the implementation of the WPPA. There are 109 recommendations in the WPPA, and 85 in the Mexico Draft; they are compared using a 2-column format. An index provides cross referencing. Topics covered include the family and the staus of women, population characteristics (addressing, in particular, the implications of the increasing proportion of young persons in populations of developing countries), and the links between morbidity and mortality and family planning. For example, the WPPA notes that "mortality reduction may be a prerequisite to a decline in fertility." In light of this, the Mexico Draft recommends that governments take immediate action to increase infant survival by expanding the use of oral rehydration therapy, immunization, and the promotion of breast feeding. In addition, nutrient supplements and appropriate day-care facilities should be provided for nursing mothers in the labor force. Other areas addressed include the need to promote the development of management in all fields related to population. This need can be met with a worldwide system of institutions designed totrain personnel. Present educational institutions should expand their curricula to include the study of population dynamics and policy. Developing countries should be provided with technical equipment and financial support to improve library facilities, computer services, data-gathring, and analysis. While international cooperation is considered crucial to the implementation of the WPPA, national governments are urged to make the attainment of self-reliance in the management of their population programs a high priorit. In recognition of the diversity of national goals, no recommendations are made regarding a world family-size norm.
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  3. 3
    075675

    The more resources will be needed, Chairman of the National Family Planning Coordinating Board (BKKBN) of Indonesia Haryono Suyono says, "as the program becomes more successful".

    Taniguchi H

    INTEGRATION. 1992 Aug; (33):11-8.

    The National Family Planning Coordinating Board (BKKBN) of Indonesia adopted Norplant as a program contraceptive soon after its introduction. 400,000-450,000 Indonesian acceptors use Norplant/year followed by the US where use sharply increased after FDA approval. The collaboration of BKKBN with its Vietnamese counterpart started after the Prime Minister requested assistant in implementing proposals, and a memorandum of understanding was signed on population and family planning in April 1992. Indonesia donated 40,000 gross of condoms, 10,000 cycles of pills, 10,000 injectables, and 1000 IUDs to Vietnam. Among the key factors of Indonesia's family planning achievements are strong community participation, the commitment of 500,000 voluntary field workers, almost 300,000 acceptor groups, and 76,000 village contraceptive distribution centers. The continuity of contraception use is stressed whether it be the pill, IUD, or injectable. Sterilization accounts only for 5-10% of acceptors in East Java province where the total fertility rate is 2.1, considered replacement level. 94.6% of married women know at least 1 contraceptive method according to the 1991 Indonesia Demographic and Health Survey. Nongovernmental organizations get assistance from UNFPA, USAID, and Pathfinder but not from the Indonesian government which, however, assists village acceptor groups and religious organizations. The training of 5000-7000 midwives/year was initiated by the Ministry of Health and BKKBN some years ago to be sent to villages where more than 15,000 are working, and 35,000 will serve 65,000 villages in another 5 years to improve maternal-child health care services. The concept of the small, happy, and prosperous family is also promoted, and a law was passed and signed in 1992 to this effect.
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  4. 4
    071357

    Patterns of fertility behaviour among female students at the University of Zambia.

    Munachonga M; Johnston T

    In: African research studies in population information, education and communication, compiled and edited by Tony Johnston, Aart de Zeeuw, and Waithira Gikonyo. Nairobi, Kenya, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1991. 83-100.

    Researchers studied 62 pregnant women intending to not terminate their pregnancy and to continue their studies and 27 nonpregnant women to learn about female student fertility related behavior. They were all enrolled at the University of Zambia either during the 1987-1988 or 1989-1990 academic years. Methodology consisted of interviews, questionnaires, and focus group discussions. 68% of all women were single with 40% of them having at least 1 child. 75% of the women were sexually active. 42.7% knew traditional family planning methods with friends, grandmothers, and social aunts telling 25.9% of all the women about such methods. Yet mass media provided most women (49.4%) with knowledge about modern methods. 50.6% thought the pill to be the most effective method. >65% considered the 24-26 as the ideal age at marriage. The mean ideal family size was 3.5, somewhat less than family size for urban women in Zambia. 71.9% considered children to be assets since children are a means to social security (33%), self fulfillment (8%), and companionship (7%). 94.4% approved of family planning mainly for purposes of child spacing (29.2%), limiting (23.6), and spacing and limiting (32.6%). Even though they knew about and approved of family planning and claimed modern attitudes concerning ideal age at marriage and ideal family size, 62% of single pregnant students and 59% of married pregnant students did not use or regularly use contraception. This suggested that they considered early childbearing to be an asset. The leading reasons for contraception nonuse included perception of low pregnancy risk (40%) and desire for a child (28%). Only 3.2% claimed method failure. 64% of all women said partners did not approve of contraceptive use. Access to family planning and cost were not a problem. Only 22% of pregnant students said pregnancy would reduce their chances of marriage. In conclusion, many women became pregnant surreptitiously.
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  5. 5
    047329

    Family planning: changed emphasis.

    ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL WEEKLY. 1987 Jul 11; 22(28):1099.

    India's family planning program has been restructured from a massive effort, using multimedia promotion and 2 million volunteers and designed to convey the "small family message" directly to the families concerned, to a smaller scale program emphasizing child survival, delayed marriage, village infrastructure, and birth spacing. The change is due to 2 factors: 1) The terminal approach failed to achieve lower birth rates because people will not accept the small family unless they can rely on the survival of the children; and 2) The terminal approach contained an element of coercion which caused the US to reduce support to the US Agency for International Development (USAID) and the UN Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA). The new scaled-down approach should be more effective, since more couples are now practicing family planning and birth spacing, oral contraceptives, IUDs, and longterm hormonal contraceptives are more appropriate than terminal methods to the present demographic picture.
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  6. 6
    033766

    International family planning: the reasons for the program.

    McPherson MP

    [Unpublished] 1985 Nov 25. 8 p.

    For some time there has been an active debate centering on the relationship between population growth and economic growth and the relationship, if any, between abortion and family planning programs. This debate has been characterized by strongly held and often polarized convictions, yet the debate usually fails to consider a most important set of reasons for family planning programs. Specifically, there has been little attention directed to the interests of families and individuals. This is unfortunate since the availability or lack of family planning services is of enormous consequences to some families and individuals. These family and individual interests fall into 3 categories: the desire of couples to determine the size and spacing of their family; mother and child survival; and reduction of abortion. The right of the family to choose the number and spacing of their children was strongly reaffirmed by international consensus at the International Conference on Population in Mexico City in 1984. Governments should not dictate the number of children couples can have, but family planning services should be encouraged so that people really do have the option, if they desire, of fewer children. Families make decisions in their own interest based upon their social and economic and religious situation. Change, including urbanization and lower child mortality, has created a new situation for millions of families throughout the developing world. One can debate the impact of population growth on economic growth in a family, but there is no question that many families feel they can do more for each child if they have fewer children. The unfulfilled desire of 3rd world families to have fewer children is not just Western speculation. Surveys show a large number of women who would like to space or limit their family size but cannot because no services are available. The health and survival of mothers and children provides a 2nd important reason for family planning. 1 of the most serious consequences of women having many children in quick succession is that more children and mothers die. There are dramatic statistics that family planning saves lives. Sound economic policies and various development efforts are critical to economic growth, but family planning has been part of successful packages in some key countries in recent years. Based upon that, sound economic and population policies are mutually supportive components of a country's plans for economic growth. This was the position taken by the Agency for International Development and remains its position. Strong family planning programs should be supported in the interests of families and individuals.
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  7. 7
    031396

    The changing roles of women and men in the family and fertility regulation: some labour policy aspects

    Oppong C

    In: Family and population. Proceedings of the "Scientific Conference on Family and Population," Espoo, Finland, May 25-27, 1984, edited by Hellevi Hatunen. Helsinki, Finland, Vaestoliitto, 1984. 62-83.

    There is growing evidence that labor policies, such as those advocated by the International Labor Organization (ILO), promote changes in familial roles and that these changes in turn have an impact on fertility. A conceptual model describing these linkages is offered and the degree to which the linkages hypothesized in the model are supported by research findings is indicated. The conceptual model specifies that: 1) as reliance on child labor declines, through the enactment of minimum age labor laws, the economic value of children declines, and parents adopt smaller family size ideals; 2) as security increases for the elderly, through the provision of social security and pension plans, the elderly become less dependent on their children, and the perceived need to produce enough children to ensure security in old age is diminished; and 3) as sexual equality in job training and employment and the availability of flexible work schedules increase, sexual equality in the domestic setting increases, and women begin to exert more control over their own fertility. ILO studies and many other studies provide considerable evidence in support of these hypothesized linkages; however, the direction or causal nature of some of the associations has not been established. Development levels, rural or urban residence, and a number of other factors also appear to influence many of these relationships. Overall, the growing body of evidence accords well with ILO programs and instruments which promote: 1) the enactment of minimum age work laws to reduce reliance on child labor, 2) the establishment of social security systems and pension plans to promote the economic independence of the elderly, 3) the promotion of sexual equality in training programs and employment; 4) the promotion of the idea of sexual equality in the domestic setting; and 5) the establishment of employment policies which do not unfairly discriminate against workers with family responsibilities.
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  8. 8
    267402

    The United Nations' flawed population policy.

    Huessy PR

    Washington, D.C., Heritage Foundation, 1984 Aug 27. 16 p. (Backgrounder No. 376)

    The United Nations' 2nd World Population Conference (Mexico City, 1984) called for greatly expanding funding for family planning assistance worldwide. The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), the conference's chief sponsor, will no doubt receive the largest portion of any assistance increase. UNFPA plays a critical role in population-related programs worldwide. The central debate on population policy should be over the extent and adequacy of the natural resources base and how countries can humanely and voluntarily change family size preferences. In countries like Singapore and South Korea, success has been achieved by combining social and economic incentives to discourage large families. Although couples in developing countries report wanting contraceptive service programs, they also want families of 4 to 6 children. So far UNFPA has been ineffective in changing the population situation. This overview of its activities reveals that UNFPA loses ultimate reponsibility for implementation of many of its own programs. UNFPA does not advocate a reduction in population growth within a single country, but rather helps couples have the number of children they desire. UNFPA's specific population and family programs are divided into functional areas: basic data collection, population change study, formulation and implementation of population policies, support for family planning/maternal child health programs and educational and communication programs. UNFPA stresses the importance of using contraceptives but not of achieving the small family norm. UNFPA's projects in some of the largest less developed nations are described, illustrating how the UN agency spends its assistance funds. From 1971 to 1982, the UNFPA spent almost US $230 million in the 10 largest less developed countries without any significant change in population growth. UNFPA program administrators are far from resolving the serious population problems facing developing countries and generally oblivious to new directions in which population policies should move. No progress will be made until UNFPA recognizes the need to approach the problem from a different perspective, working to change attitudes toward small families.
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  9. 9
    091102

    The role of UNFPA and non-governmental organisations in the field of population.

    Singh JS

    In: D'Souza AA, de Souza A, ed. Population growth and human development. New Delhi, India, Indian Social Institute, 1974. 27-31.

    The actions undertaken by UNFPA on population matters have been guided by 3 basic principles. 1st is the emphasis on the right of the individual to have access to knowledge and facilities on the basis of which he/she could decide freely on the family size and child spacing. 2ndly, population has always been viewed by the UN in the larger context of development. 3rdly, the responsibility for action on population questions is considered to be within the sovereign domain of national governments. The increasing involvement of national governments in population activities and the increasing role of the UN system in providing assistance for such programs led to the designation of World Population Year in 1974. The Year provides an opportunity for increasing the awareness and understanding of population questions among people around the world. Community groups have an important role to play in promoting awareness and understanding of the population question among people everywhere. The community accepts ideas more easily if they can be shown to have already acquired a degree of social acceptability. The population question touches the standards of moral and ethical behavior in a personal way. If it can be shown that the new patterns of family life are related in a significant way to well established norms of ethical behavior, it will be so much easier for individuals to follow new patterns of behavior. The role of education in promoting and deepening awareness of population issues should be included in the development of population information.
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  10. 10
    266434
    Peer Reviewed

    Plundering the poor: the role of the World Bank in the third world.

    Feder E

    International Journal of Health Services. 1983; 13(4):649-60.

    In this review of Cheryl Payer's recent book, The World Bank: A Critical Analysis, the World Bank's role in the third world and the reasons why poverty, hunger, malnutrition, and unemployment are on the rise are discussed. The World Bank annually gives billions of dollars to third world governments, supposedly to develop their economies through a variety of loan projects. In reality, the loans subsidized the transnational corporations from the industrial countries and expand their industrial, commercial and financial activities in the third world. Capitalism has brought technological innovations, lowered infant mortality rates, and lengthened life expectancy in the third world. But it has also resulted in rapid population growth and an increase in other problems. Food, water, medical services, sanitary facilities and housing are becoming scarce to the poor. The World Bank has used its large resources, distributed annually on an increasing scale to its member countries, to expand capitalism in the third world and to fortify the business activities of the transnational corporations, including the large transnational banks. Many of the underdeveloped economies are having a difficult time due to an immense debt burden from all the lending activities of the World Bank. It is believed that the World Bank and capitalism will not be able to resolve the economic and social problems of the third world, and that socialism holds more hope for the masses worldwide. Under socialism, the World Bank would cease to exist. The World Bank and other UN agencies speak much, but really care nothing about problems facing the third world. It is believed that the growth of these problems are the prelude to the coming revolution that so frightens the World Bank and its supporters.
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  11. 11
    266261

    Assistance in undertaking IE/C appraisal planning.

    Shim DS

    [Unpublished] July, 1979. 49 p.

    This study assesses the effectiveness of family planning education in the Republic of Korea over the past 2 decades. Target populations in various metropolitan areas were studied regarding attitudes toward family planning knowledge, contraceptive behavior, media and personal contacts on family planning, number and gender preferences, and spacing preferences. Socioeconomic and demographic factors were taken into account. Statistics were compiled by area and analyses are presented. Use of more mass media is suggested to get information on family planning across to more people. It is important to extend the range and quality of family planning services, most especially to provide the best information about contraceptive methods.
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  12. 12
    265897

    Notes on activities in the field of population.

    Jimlar Mutane. 1976 Feb; 1(1):191-202.

    The Committee for International Coordination of National Research (CICRED), formed by the UN in 1971, commissioned a number of national monographs on "Past, Present and Future Trends of Population" for African countries. A report on the UN programs of demographic training in Africa pinpoints governments, universities, and the UN as sponsors and centers for demographic training and education. The UN's program, in cooperation with African governments, the Economic Commission for Africa, the Conference of African Statisticians, and the Conference of African Planners, established statistical training centers at middle, intermediate, and high levels of competence in demographic statistics. Demographic teaching in UN sponsored demographic units in African universities provides for teaching and research programs. The Cairo Demographic Center has carried out a number of research projects which have helped in understanding demographic trends in the area it serves. It has established a program for team research, selecting different demographic topics for different years, and awarding fellowships for trainees. The Regional Institute for Population Studies in Ghana, the Institut de Formation et de Recherche Demographiques in the Republic of Cameroon, and the Cairo Demographic Center follow the same model with training in: substantive and technical demography; and ancillary subjects such as mathematics, statistics, sampling, survey and research methodology, sociology, economic development planning, genetics, and physiology of reproduction. The centers plan to provide field experiences to students by jointly sponsoring ad hoc demographic surveys in the host countries. Coordinators among different UN agencies meet annually to coordinate training activities. A survey of women from the Republic of Cameroon showed that women desire population growth; their ideal family size is 6; they desire family planning information; they want sex education taught in post primary institutions; they prefer polygamy; their ideal age of marriage is 18.
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  13. 13
    264061

    Impact of population assistance to an African country: Department of State, Agency for International Development. Report to the Congress by the Comptroller General of the United States

    United States. Comptroller General

    U.S. General Accounting Office. Comptroller General, Washington, D.C., United States, 1977. (ID-77-3) v, 65 p.

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  14. 14
    264034

    A selection of articles and speeches on the status of women and family planning in Yugoslavia

    Tomsic V

    Federal Council for Family Planning, Belgrade, Yugoslavia, 1975. 112 p.

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  15. 15
    260864

    Labour and population.

    United Nations Fund for Population Activities [UNFPA]

    N.Y., UNFPA, [1977]. 47 p. (Population Profiles 5)

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  16. 16
    260771

    Proposal for program development in family health and population: West Africa.

    DE SWEEMER C

    Unpublished, 1974. 59 p

    Recommended program strategy for the Ford Foundation in West Africa would concentrate upon delivery of integrated maternal-child health services including nutrition, immunizations, preventive and curative care for mothers and children. As a means of child spacing, family planning would be approved by the population, but population control programs per se at present run counter to West African ideals, and political resistance would probably result. In the context of high West African child mortality rates (e.g. from birth to 15 years a rate of 400-750 deaths per 1000 live births) a small family norm may be undesirable. Maternal-child health services are difficult to implement and little progress has been made in providing any component of maternal/child health or family planning on a nationwide level. Constraints on planning include the lack of preparation of medical and nursing practitioners for health planning, the problem of carrying out and interpreting research and small trials, the lack of a functioning interdisciplinary communications network for practitioners, lack of funds, and lack of appropriately trained manpower. Contraints on the production of action-oriented research are similar to contraints on planning of maternal-child health services. An optimal strategy for the Ford Foundation should cover many facets. Research and training should be developed in phases, and training should be reoriented to provide training within Africa for a critical mass of practitioners who concentrate on applied skills and can work in an interdisciplinary setting. Research should focus on developing a data base, creating tools for health planning, and improving the skills of researchers. Institution building, while necessary, should be undertaken cautiously, with the goal of developing a coordinating mechanism. The activities of the Population Council, USAID, UNFPA, WHO, IDRC, and the Dutch and Belgian governments in the area should be considered in the Ford Foundation's plans. An intensive effort in a limited geographic area is preferable to spreading resources too thinly over the whole region.
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  17. 17
    167030

    Population programs in the post Bucharest era: toward a third pathway.

    Korten DC

    Cambridge, Mass., Harvard Institute for International Development, Dec. 1975. 53 p. (Development Discussion Paper No. 9)

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  18. 18
    259577

    Future prospects of family planning in India: some emerging issues.

    BOSE A

    In: Seminar on India's Population Future, Bombay, 1974: Proceedings. Bombay, International Institute for Population Studies, 1975. pp. 59-71

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  19. 19
    024689

    The women of rural Asia.

    Whyte RO; Whyte P

    Boulder, Colorado, Westview, 1982. 262 p. (Westview Special Studies on Women in Contemporary Society)

    This book provides a descriptive analysis of the historical, cultural, and environmental causes of women's current status in rural Asia. This analysis is requisite to improving the quality of these women's lives and enabling them to contribute to the economy without excessive disruption of family life and the social structure of the rural communities. Many studies of rural areas have ignored this half of the population. Analyzed in detail are social and economic status, family and workforce roles, and quality of life of women in the rural sectors of monsoonal and equatorial Asia, from Pakistan to Japan, where life often is characterized by unemployment, underemployment, and poverty. It has become increasingly necessary for rural women in this region to contribute to family budgets in ways beyond their traditional roles in crop production and animal husbandry. Many women are responding by taking part in rural industries, yet the considerable disadvantages under which they labor--less opportunity for education, lower pay, and poor access to resources and high status jobs--render them much less effective than they could be in their efforts to increase production and reduce poverty. A review of the activities of national and international agencies in relation to the status of women is also included, as well as an outline of major needs, and current indicators of change.
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  20. 20
    015147

    Some health-related aspects of fertility.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    [Unpublished] 1983. Presented at the International Conference on Population, 1984, Expert Group on Fertility and Family, New Delhi, January 5-11, 1983. 22 p. (IESA/P/ICP. 1984/EG.I/8)

    The World Health Organization (WHO) has been studying several national surveys with regard to certain health related aspects of fertility. The primary purpose of these studies was to stimulate the use of data by the national health authorities for an improved care system for maternal and child health, including family planning. Some preliminary results are reported in this discussion, in particular those relating to contraception, the reproductive health of adolescents, infertility and subfecundity, and breastfeeding. The national surveys concerned are those of Bangladesh, Indonesia, the Republic of Korea, the Philippines, and Sri Lanka. The methods of analysis were simple and traditional, except for 2 points: some of the data had to be obtained by additional tabulation of the raw data tapes and/or the recode tapes since the standard tabulations of the First Country Reports did not include the needed information; and Correspondence Analysis was used in an effort to stimulate and facilitate the use of the findings for improvements of national health programs. Methods of contraception vary widely, from 1 country to another and by age, parity, and socioeconomic grouping. The younger women tend to choose more effective modern methods, such as oral contraception (OC); the older women, i.e., those over age 35, tend to seek sterilization, if available. It is evident that the historical development of family planning methods has greatly influenced the current "mix" of methods and so has the current supply situation and the capacity of the health care system (particularly in regard to IUD insertions and sterilizations. Use of contraception among adolescents to postpone the 1st birth was practically unknown. The risk of complications at pregnancy and childbirth, including maternal and infant death, is known to be particularly high for young mothers, and the results clearly showed that the infant mortality rate is highest for the youngest mothers. All the women who suffer from infertility do not recognize their condition, but the limited data still point to the need to consider the health needs of women who suffer from unwanted fecundity impairments. This may require medical intervention to cure infections or the offer of relevant sexual counseling. Some infecundity may require the improvement of nutritional and personal hygienic levels before meaningful achievements are made. The prevalence of breastfeeding has declined in some population groups, and the consequences can be expected to be deleterious and to involve serious increases in specific morbidity and mortality.
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