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  1. 1
    059074

    Annual report 88/89.

    Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka

    Colombo, Sri Lanka, Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka, 1989. 43 p.

    The Family Planning Association of Sri Lanka (FPASL) is a member of the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). According to the FPASL the family planning (FP) acceptor rate in 1988 declined by 22% compared to 1987 and is primarily the result of civil war and an election year. Because of complex political and sociological factors, people have been more concerned with staying alive, than with FP. District level programs designed to improve the quality of life for mothers and children were often halted during the end of the year because of terrorist activities and counter security measures. The following contraceptive methods experienced declines in acceptors: sterilization 48%, IUD 12%, pill 12%, injectables 8%, foam tablets 22%. In 1988 there were 629 vasectomies, and 393 tubectomies. Of the new acceptors of temporary methods 57.8% chose depo provera, 21.3% IUD, 15.9% orals, and 5% Norplant. Sales of contraceptives have changed with condom sales down 3.6%, orals up 7.5%, and foam down 78.25%. The Community Managed Integrated Rural Family Health Programme (CMIRFH) has been recognized globally as a story of success. Since 1980 over 45,000 people have volunteered to help this program. In 1988 1676 programs were carried out by these enthusiastic young volunteers. Of the 25,000 estimated villages in Sri Lanka, the FPASL and CMIRFH program had reached 1689 villages through the end of 1988. The Youth and Population Committee is trying to reach the young people with the message that the population is growing out of hand. In July a seminar was conducted when the population of Asia reached 3 billion.
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  2. 2
    069834

    In Sri Lanka, a clearer focus.

    POPULATION. 1991 Dec; 17(12):3.

    In order to improve maternal and child health and family planning services in areas of Sri Lanka that lag in health and social development, UNFPA has created a program called "More Focused." This program targets underserved places such as fishing villages, plantations, and slums. More Focused represents part of UNFPA's program package intended to help Sri Lanka reach its goal of replacement level fertility by the year 2000. The approach of More focused offers underserved regions more than simply contraceptive services. The program provides an array of services that address problems such as poor nutrition, low literacy levels, and cultural factors. For example, More Focus is attempting to improve the conditions and the self-confidence of women working in Sri Lanka's free-trade zones, which contain the heaviest concentration of malnourished women. The project gives women instruction on nutrition, money management, health, family planning, etc. The women have gained confidence and have organized themselves to discuss employment-related issues with their employees. For its 1992-96 country program, UNFPA has emphasized the "cafeteria approach" to family planning, which makes available a wide variety of contraceptives. In the past, many had complained that Sri-Lanka had concentrated too heavily on sterilization. The new approach makes contraceptive services more sensitive to specific social and cultural settings. Nonetheless, Sri Lanka still faces serious obstacles to achieving its goal for the year 2000. Years of civil war have interrupted the accomplishments of its once-legendary family planning program. Nonetheless, UNFPA remains optimistic that the country's continuing family planning effort will lead to replacement level fertility.
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  3. 3
    058684

    Family planning, the Lebanese experience. A study on the Lebanese Family Planning Association.

    Iliyya S

    [Unpublished] 1984 Jul. [4], 193 p.

    As of 1984, Lebanon had not yet formulated a clear and specific population policy because laws existed against contraception and political differences among the various ethnic groups also existed which culminated in a civil war. Nevertheless the government condoned the creation of the Lebanese Family Planning Association (LFPA) in August 1969 and its activities. The government also helped spread family planning through its own institutions such as the Ministry of Health and the Office of Social Development. Further some of LFPA's staff members have been part of the government itself. LFPA conducted a survey in June 1975 in Zahrani in rural south Lebanon and it showed that the people wished to limit their fertility, but could not since birth control was not available. Therefore LFPA established the 1st Community Based Family Planning Services Program in Zahrani which later spread to other villages. Wasitas (field workers) served as the major means of providing birth control and information to the women. They emphasized child spacing. The wasitas also served as a major adaptive and indigenous agent of social change and development. Initially they underwent intensive training lasting at least 1 week, but in 1979, LFPA hosted annual 1 month training sessions. The wasitas use of traditional communication methods resulted in not only an increase of contraceptive use, but also in meeting the elemental needs of the women for psychological comfort and self reliance. In some instances, however, some wasitas resorted to deception in encouraging the most uneducated women to use birth control because of strong incentives, e.g., the wasita received 50% of the money earned for the sale of each contraceptive. LFPA needed to reassess those measures which lead to possible encroachment of the dignity and freedom of choice of the women villagers.
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