Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 1 Results

  1. 1
    016499

    Health for all by year 2000.

    Jones L

    Populi. 1983; 10(1):78-81.

    The World Health Organization's (WHO) aim is to achieve a level of health that will allow all the world's citizens to lead a socially and economically productive life by the year 2000. Peter D. O'Neill's book, "Health Crisis 2000," is based on WHO's European regional strategy for attaining "health for all" by the year 2000. Its goal is to enable a large audience to participate in a dialogue on the real issues. An analysis of trends in health and disease, made over the past 3 years by representatives of the medical profession, has produced ominous signs that current health policies have set a dangerous course. If "health for all" is to be realized by the year 2000, it will be necessary to implement a new strategy with 3 inseparable themes, i.e., health as a way of life, the prevention of ill health, and community care for all. While the book analyzes the 1st stage of work which the WHO European Region has drawn up for itself, it interprets the official strategy document and offers ample detail to draw ministers, parliamentarians, industrialists, and the media into the debate. Fakhruddin Iqbal reports that a recent study suggests that the Bangladesh family planning program neglected to consider age old social and cultural values. The study identifies 2 distinct cultural values that present obstacles to the program: the traditional preferences for age old treatment as opposed to modern medical practices and the persistent tradition of relegating women to the lowest rung of mass education; and the traditional family size perceptions of the people. Andrew Hamilton writes that the Jamaica Family Planning Association has employed 7 people to spread knowledge of family life education and family planning among youth. These 18-23 year old youth associates are part of a major national drive to keep Jamaica's population below 3 million by the year 2000. About traditional midwives Jan Steele writes that they deliver between 60-80% of babies in the developing world each year and provide support and care in environments commonly shunned by the medical profession. The IPS reports that according to the 1980 census the population of Brazil is 120 million. If the current demographic trends continue, the population will double by 2014. With the present unemployment level, there will be 41.5 million people underemployed and 15 million unemployed in 2014. Meena Panday writes that Nepal cannot seem to get its population program going. The Population Council reports that no evidence exists as yet that use of the copper bearing or nonmedicated IUD increases the risk of ectopic pregnancy.
    Add to my documents.