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Your search found 18 Results

  1. 1
    099404

    International Conference on Population and Development (ICPD), Cairo, Egypt, 5-13th September 1994. National position paper.

    Zambia. National Commission for Development Planning

    Lusaka, Zambia, National Commission for Development Planning, 1993 Dec. viii, 39 p.

    Zambia's country report for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens with a review of the country's unfavorable economic and demographic situation. Population growth has been increasing (by 2.6% for 1963-69 and 3.2% for 1980-90) because of a high birth rate and a death rate which is declining despite an increase in infant and child mortality. The population is extremely mobile and youthful (49.6% under age 15 years in 1990). Formulation of a population policy began in 1984, and an implementation program was announced in 1989. International guidance has played a major role in the development of the policy and implementation plans but an inadequacy of resources has hindered implementation. New concerns (the status of women; HIV/AIDS; the environment; homeless children and families; increasing poverty; and the increase in infant, child, and maternal mortality) have been added to the formerly recognized urgent problems caused by the high cost of living, youth, urbanization, and rural underdevelopment. To date, population activities have been donor-driven; therefore, more government and individual support will be sought and efforts will be made to ensure that donor support focuses on the local institutionalization of programs. The country report presents the demographic context in terms of population size and growth, fertility, mortality, migration, urbanization, spatial distribution, population structure, and the implications of this demographic situation. The population policy, planning, and program framework is described through information on national perceptions of population issues, the role of population in development planning, the evolution and current status of the population policy, and a profile of the national population program (research methodology; integrated planning; information, education, and communication; health, fertility, and mortality regulatory initiatives; HIV/AIDS; migration; the environment; adolescents; women; and demography training). A description of the operational aspects of population and family planning (FP) program implementation covers political and national support, the national implementation strategy, program coordination, service delivery and quality of care, HIV/AIDS, personnel recruitment and training, evaluation, and financial resources. The discussion of the national plan for the future involves priority concerns, the policy framework, programmatic activities, and resource mobilization.
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  2. 2
    099389

    National report on population and development of Malaysia. International Conference on Population and Development, September, 1994, Cairo.

    Malaysia. National Population and Family Development Board. Technical Working Group for ICPD

    [Kuala Lumpur], Malaysia, National Population and Family Development Board, Technical Working Group for ICPD, 1993. [4], 64 p.

    Malaysia considers its population policy an integral part of its overall social and economic policy planning. In order to achieve its goal of becoming an industrialized nation by the year 2020, Malaysia considers it imperative to create a quality population based around a strong family unit and a caring society. This report on population and development in Malaysia begins with a description of the demographic context in terms of past and current trends in population size, growth, and structure; fertility, mortality, and migration as well as the outlook for the future. The implementation of the population policy, planning, and program is described in the context of the following issues: longterm population growth, fertility interventions, women's labor force participation, aging, the family, internal and international migration, urbanization, and the environment. The evolution of the population policy is included as is its relationship with such other population-related policies as health, education, human resource development, regional development, and the eradication of poverty. Information is provided on the current status of the population policy and on the role of population issues in development planning. A profile of the national population program includes a discussion of maternal-child health services; family planning services and family development; information, education, and communication; data collection and analysis, the relationship of women to population and development; mortality; migration; the environment; human resources development, poverty alleviation; aging; and HIV/AIDS. The national action plan for the future is presented through a discussion of the emerging and priority concerns of population and family development and an outline of the policy framework. The summary reiterates Malaysia's efforts to integrate population factors into development planning and its commitment to promoting environmentally-sound and sustainable development. Appendices present data in tabular form on population and development indicators, population policies, incentives, and programs; program results; and the phase and area of implementation of the national population and family development programs.
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  3. 3
    099397

    The International Conference on Population and Development, September 5-13, 1994, Cairo, Egypt. Nepal's country report.

    Nepal. National Planning Commission

    Kathmandu, Nepal, National Planning Commission, 1993 Sep. vi, 49 p.

    Prepared for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this country report from Nepal opens with a description of the geographic features and administrative regions, zones, and districts of the country. 91% of the population of Nepal is rural, and agriculture accounts for 57% of the gross domestic product. Nepal has made some socioeconomic gains from 1961 to 1991 which are reflected in improved life expectancy (from 34 to 54.4 years), a decline in the infant mortality rate (from 200 to 102), and an improvement in the literacy rate (from 9 to > 40%). However, the per capital income of US $180 and rapid population growth have impeded improvement in the standard of living. The new government of Nepal is committed to establishing a better balance between population and the environment. This report provides a discussion of population growth and structure; population distribution, urbanization, and migration; the environment and sustainable development; the status of women; population policies and programs (highlighting the population policy of the plan for 1992-97); the national family planning program and health programs; and intervention issues. A 15-point summary is provided, and details of the objectives, priorities, and major policy thrust in regard to population and development of the Eight Plan (1992-97) are appended.
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  4. 4
    099432

    Government of Sierra Leone. National report on population and development. International Conference on Population and Development 1994.

    Sierra Leone. National Population Commission

    Freetown, Sierra Leone, National Population Commission, 1994. [4], 15, [4] p.

    The government of Sierra Leone is very concerned about the poor health status of the country as expressed by the indicators of a high maternal mortality rate (700/100,000), a total fertility rate of 6.2 (in 1985), a crude birth rate of 47/1000 (in 1985), an infant mortality rate of 143/1000 (in 1990), and a life expectancy at birth of only 45.7 years. A civil war has exacerbated the already massive rural-urban migration in the country. Despite severe financial constraints, the government has contributed to the UN Population Fund and continues to appeal to the donor community for technical and financial help to support the economy in general and population programs in particular. Sierra Leone has participated in preparations for and fully supports the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development. This document describes Sierra Leone's past, present, and future population and development linkages. The demographic context is presented in terms of size and growth rate; age and sex composition; fertility; mortality; and population distribution, migration, and urbanization. The population policy planning and program framework is set out through discussions of the national perception of population issues, the national population policy, population in development planning, and a profile of the national population program [including maternal-child health and family planning (FP) services; information, education, and communication; data collection, analysis, and research; primary health care, population and the environment; youth and adolescents and development; women and development; and population distribution and migration]. The operational aspects of the program are described with emphasis on political and national support, FP service delivery and coverage, monitoring and evaluation, and funding. The action plan for the future includes priority concerns; an outline of the policy framework; the design of population program activities; program coordination, monitoring, and evaluation; and resource mobilization. The government's commitment is reiterated in a summary and in 13 recommendations of action to strengthen the population program, address environmental issues, improve the status of women, improve rural living conditions, and improve data collection.
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  5. 5
    074857

    International Symposium: For the Survival of Mankind: Population, Environment and Development.

    Mainichi Shimbun; Japan. National Institute for Research Advancement; United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    Ann Arbor, Michigan, University of Michigan, Dept. of Population Planning and International Health, [1989]. xxxiii, 134 p.

    In August 1989, scientists and leaders of international and national groups met at the international symposium for the Survival of Mankind in Tokyo, Japan, to discuss ideas about the interrelationship between population, environment, and development and obstacles to attaining sustainable development. The President of the Worldwatch Institute opened the symposium with a talk about energy, food, and population. Of fossil fuels, nuclear power, and solar energy, only the clean and efficient solar energy can provide sustainable development. Humanity has extended arable lands and irrigation causing soil erosion, reduced water tables, produced water shortages, and increased salivation. Thus agricultural advances since the 1950s cannot continue to raise crop yields. He also emphasized the need to halt population growth. He suggested Japan provide more international assistance for sustainable development. This talk stimulated a lively debate. The 2nd session addressed the question whether the planet can support 5. 2 billion people (1989 population). The Executive Director of UNFPA informed the audience that research shows that various factors are needed for a successful population program: political will, a national plan, a prudent assessment of the sociocultural context, support from government agencies, community participation, and improvement of women's status. Other topics discussed during this session were urbanization, deforestation, and international environmental regulation. The 3rd session covered various ways leading to North-South cooperation. A Chinese participant suggested the establishment of an international environmental protection fund which would assist developing countries with their transition to sustainable development and to develop clean energy technologies and environmental restoration. Another participant proposed formation of a North-South Center in Japan. The 4th session centered around means to balance population needs, environmental protection, and socioeconomic development.
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  6. 6
    098973

    India: country statement. International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 1994.

    India. Department of Family Welfare

    New Delhi, India, Department of Family Welfare, 1994. [5], 61 p.

    The country report prepared by India for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development opens by noting that India's population has increased from 361.1 million in 1951 to 846.3 million in 1991. In describing the demographic context of this, the largest democracy in the world, information is given on the growth rate, the sex ratio, the age structure, marital status, demographic transition, internal migration, urbanization, the economically active population and the industrial structure, literacy and education, data collection and analysis, and the outlook for the future. The second section of the report discusses India's population policy, planning, and programmatic framework. Topics covered include the national perception of population issues, the evolution of the population policy, the national family welfare program (infrastructure and services; maternal and child health; information, education, and communication; and achievements), the relationship of women to population and development, the relationship of population issues and sectoral activities, the environment, adolescents and youth, and AIDS. The third section presents operational aspects of family welfare program implementation and covers political and national support, the implementation strategy, the new action plan, program achievements and constraints, monitoring and evaluation, and financial aspects. The national action plan for the future is the topic of the fourth chapter and is discussed in terms of emerging and priority concerns, the role and relevance of the World Population Plan of Action and other international instruments, international migration, science and technology, and economic stabilization, structural reforms, and international financial support. After a 24-point summary, demographic information is appended in 17 tables and charts.
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  7. 7
    099406

    Country report: Bangladesh. International Conference on Population and Development, Cairo, 5-13 September 1994.

    Bangladesh

    [Unpublished] 1994. iv, 45 p.

    The country report prepared by Bangladesh for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development begins by highlighting the achievements of the family planning (FP)/maternal-child health (MCH) program. Political commitment, international support, the involvement of women, and integrated efforts have led to a decline in the population growth rate from 3 to 2.07% (1971-91), a decline in total fertility rate from 7.5 to 4.0% (1974-91), a reduction in desired family size from 4.1 to 2.9 (1975-89), a decline in infant mortality from 150 to 88/1000 (1975-92), and a decline in the under age 5 years mortality from 24 to 19/1000 (1982-90). In addition, the contraceptive prevalence rate has increased from 7 to 40% (1974-91). The government is now addressing the following concerns: 1) the dependence of the FP and health programs on external resources; 2) improving access to and quality of FP and health services; 3) promoting a demand for FP and involving men in FP and MCH; and 4) achieving social and economic development through economic overhaul and by improving education and the status of women and children. The country report presents the demographic context by giving a profile of the population and by discussing mortality, migration, and future growth and population size. The population policy, planning, and program framework is described through information on national perceptions of population issues, the evolution and current status of the population policy (which is presented), the role of population in development planning, and a profile of the national population program (reproductive health issues; MCH and FP services; information, education, and communication; research methodology; the environment, aging, adolescents and youth, multi-sectoral activities, women's status; the health of women and girls; women's education and role in industry and agriculture, and public interventions for women). The description of the operational aspects of population and family planning (FP) program implementation includes political and national support, the national implementation strategy, evaluation, finances and resources, and the role of the World Population Plan of Action. The discussion of the national plan for the future involves emerging and priority concerns, the policy framework, programmatic activities, resource mobilization, and regional and global cooperation.
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  8. 8
    092019

    Synthesis of the expert group meetings convened as part of the substantive preparations for the International Conference on Population and Development.

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1993; (34-35):3-18.

    As part of the preparation for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development to be sponsored by the UN in Cairo, 6 expert groups were convened to consider 1) population growth; 2) population policies and programs; 3) population, development, and the environment; 4) migration; 5) the status of women; and 6) family planning programs, health, and family well-being. Each group included 15 experts representing a full range of relevant scientific disciplines and geographic regions. Each meeting lasted 5 days and included a substantive background paper prepared by the Population Division as well as technical papers. Each meeting concluded with the drafting of between 18 and 37 recommendations (a total of 162). The meeting on population, the environment, and development focused on the implications of current trends in population and the environment for sustained economic growth and sustainable development. The meeting on population policies and programs observed that, since 1984, there has been a growing convergence of views about population growth among the nations of the world and that the stabilization of world population as soon as possible is now an internationally recognized goal. The group on population and women identified practical steps that agencies could take to empower women in order to achieve beneficial effects on health, population trends, and development. The meeting on FP, health, and family well-being reviewed policy-oriented issues emerging from the experience of FP programs. The meeting on population growth and development reviewed trends and prospects of population growth and age structure and their consequences for global sustainability. The population distribution and migration experts appraised current trends and their interrelationship with development. In nearly all of the group meetings, common issues emerged. Concern was universally voiced for sustainable development and sustained economic growth, relevance of past experience, human rights, the status of women, the family, accessibility and quality of services, the special needs of subpopulations, AIDS, the roles of governments and nongovernmental organizations, community participation, research and data collection, and international cooperation.
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  9. 9
    092021

    Introduction. Review of the six expert group meetings.

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1993; (34-35):1.

    On July 26, 1991, the Economic and Social Council resolved to convene an International Conference on Population and Development under the auspices of the UN. To prepare for the conference, 6 expert group meetings were held to address the following issues: 1) population growth, demographic changes, and the interaction between demographic variables and socioeconomic development; 2) population policies and programs, emphasizing the mobilization of resources for developing countries; 3) the interrelationships between population, development, and the environment; 4) changes in the distribution of population; 5) the relationship between enhancing the status of women and population dynamics; and 6) family planning programs, health, and family well-being. A synthesis of these meetings is presented in the 34/35 issue of "Population Bulletin" (1993).
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  10. 10
    082518

    Programme review and strategy development report: Brazil.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1992. ix, 81 p.

    Rapid industrialization, general economic development, and insufficient attention to social development have caused great social and development gaps within regions and between regions in Brazil. Brazil is very urbanized and is at the end stage of the demographic transition, with a somewhat low and decreasing population growth rate and an aging population structure. Mortality and fertility remain high, however, among some populations. Internal migration still shapes some regions. In the past, Brazil's population policy mainly consisted of colonizing the interior with construction of a network of roads, resulting in environmental destruction. Brazil's development planning system has shifted from centralized planning to one following market forces. Brazil conducts censuses, but long delays and limited flexibility in the production and distribution of results exist. The vital statistics system in most of Brazil needs to improve. Policymakers tend to not use population studies. The public and private sectors provide maternal and child health and family planning services. The health care system is dominated by high-cost, hospital-based, curative care. Public health spending is limited in the poorest areas where infant and maternal mortality is still high. Limited contraceptive choices and lack of information have resulted in a high rate of abortion and adolescent pregnancy. Sex education emphasizes biological reproduction and basically neglects the psychological, sociocultural, and gender aspects. Most people support environmental education, but the link between environment and population tends to be ignored. Women's groups and female labor participation are growing. 54% of adolescents live in poverty. 500,000 are street children and a high risk of delinquency and prostitution. UNFPA, UNICEF, and the World Bank are international sources supporting population-related activities. The report lists objectives and strategies and proposals for UNFPA assistance.
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  11. 11
    064829

    Kenya at the demographic turning point? Hypotheses and a proposed research agenda.

    Kelley AC; Nobbe CE

    Washington, D.C., World Bank, 1990. xvi, 97 p. (World Bank Discussion Papers 107)

    The interactions within and between the determinants and consequences of rapid population growth in Kenya are analyzed with a view to fostering a research agenda and proving insights for the creation of a population strategy during the next decade. Despite Kenya's long-standing concern about checking its rapid population growth, annual growth rates reach 4%. However, Kenya may be entering a new demographic phase of declining growth rates. Population pressure, through both reduced benefits and increasing costs of children to the household, may be responsible for moderate demographic change. Fertility declines with an eventually sustainable balance between population numbers and the economy and the environment depend upon factors motivating parents to desire fewer offspring. These motivating factors, in turn, depend upon the interrelations among population growth, society, economy, and population policy and programming. While the time frame for demographic transition remains elusive, population programming undertaken thus far, though failing to effect change up to now, may hold the key to future successes. Health delivery and family planning systems are already in place and will influence the pace of population growth decline during future decades. Population and economic trends, population policies and programs for the period 1965-89, research, strategy, and recommendations are discussed at length.
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  12. 12
    074615

    Population issues: briefing kit 1992.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, 1992 Jul. [2], 21 p.

    The UN Family Planning (FP) Association briefing kit examines 10 key issues in the field of population and development: changes in population growth; balancing population growth in developing countries; population program needs for 2000; the right to FP; growing support for population policy; valuing women equally; balancing people with environmental resources; migration and urbanization; information, education, and communication (IEC); and overcoming the barriers to reliable statistics. These issues demand prompt and urgent action. World population is expected to reach 6 billion by 1998, or 250,000 births/day. 95% of population growth is in developing countries. There have been decreases in family size from 6.1 to 3.9 today, and population growth has declined, but the absolute numbers continue to increase. Over 50% of the world's population in 2000 will be under 25 years. Population growth is not expected to stop until 2200 at 11.6 billion. By 2020-25, the developed world's population will be under 20% and will account for 3% of the annual population increase. Africa's population growth is the fastest at 3.0%/year, including 3.2% in eastern and western Africa, while Europe's is .24%/year. The demographic trends are indicated by region. FP program funding needs to be doubled by 2000 to US $9 billion in order to achieve the medium or most likely projection. $4.5 billion would have to be contributed by developing countries to achieve coverage for 59% of women of reproductive age. Of the US $971 million contributed in 1990, the US contributed $281 million, followed by $64 million from Japan. Other large contributors were Norway, Germany, Canada, Sweden, the UK, and the Netherlands, including the World Bank. In 1990, 141 countries received international population assistance of US $602 million, of which Asia and the Pacific received 35%, sub-Saharan Africa 25%, Latin America 15%, the Middle East and North Africa 9%, Europe 1%, and interregional 15%. FP must be an attitude toward life. Having a national population policy and implementation of an integrated program with development is the objective for all countries. The best investment is in women through increasing educational levels and status and reducing maternal mortality. Policies must also balance resource use between urban and rural areas; urban strategies must include improvement in rural conditions.
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  13. 13
    074132

    Reproductive health: a key to a brighter future. Biennial report 1990-1991. Special 20th anniversary issue.

    Khanna J; Van Look PF; Griffin PD

    Geneva, Switzerland, World Health Organization [WHO], 1992. xiii, 171 p.

    WHO established its Special Programme of Research, Development, and Research Training in Human Reproduction in 1972 to promote, coordinate, conduct, and evaluate research in human reproduction in both developed and developing countries. Its aim is to assist developing countries meet the reproductive health needs of their populations. The first section of the biennial report discusses the reproductive health status in the world including fertility regulation, sexual health, infertility, and safe motherhood since 1972. Despite considerable progress in the last 20 years, unmet needs remain substantial. New environmental concerns related to population growth and maternal and child health concerns, women's status, and human development all dictate a sense of urgency. The second section covers specific activities of the Programme in the last 20 years. It includes the results of an external evaluation of the effect the Programme has had. It found the Programme's effect to be most successful due to its collaborating centers and multicenter trials and studies, epidemiologists, clinicians, and laboratory scientists. This section also includes viewpoints from China, Kenya, and Mexico. 2 former directors of the Programme present a historical account of the Programme's accomplishments. The third section discusses progress the Programme had made during 1990-91. It specifically covers development and assessment of fertility regulation technologies, prevention of infertility, improving family planning choices through systematic introduction and proper management of contraceptive methods, epidemiologic research, social measurements of reproductive health, and improving capacity for key national reproductive health research.
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  14. 14
    075112

    After Rio: co-operation, not confrontation.

    Sadik N

    POPULI. 1992 Jul-Aug; 19(2):14.

    The UN Conference on Environment and Development or the Earth Summit in Rio de Janeiro in June 1992 marked the 1st time a UN-sponsored environment conference even addressed population and environment issues. World leaders, agency leaders, and respected professionals emphasized that population is a key issue in sustainable development. For example, Prime Minister Gro Harlem Brundtland noted the interconnectedness of poverty, environment, and population. The blueprint for action from the Summit, Agenda 21, provided clear guidelines for countries to adopt to change course. Very little emphasis was placed on population, however. Even though there are various ways to interpret and implement the guidelines, the countries should do so in a spirit of cooperation rather than confrontation. They should remember that the whole planet is at stake. Many discussions of the preparatory committees and at the Global Forum centered around women's rights and government policy. The Executive Director of UNFPA does not consider these 2 concerns as opposites since government programs depend on the cooperation of both women and men. Family planning (FP) programs also depend on them. FP programs cannot succeed without an involved government. The core of population programs is reduction of family size via provision of effective FP services. Yet they also should provide effective maternal and child health care services with adequate numbers of trained and supervised health workers. Agenda 21 did not mention men even though FP and family welfare are also men's issues. Men also determine the success of FP programs and family welfare programs. In the next decade, we must all work together for sustainable development since our lives and those of our children depend on it.
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  15. 15
    069079

    Population: more than a numbers game.

    Walker A

    BMJ. British Medical Journal. 1991 Nov 9; 303(6811):1194-7.

    World population reached 5 billion on July 11, 1987. Current UNFPA projections predict world population stabilization at 10 billion by 2050. However, the current population is already exerting a tremendous amount of pressure on the carrying capacity of the planet. Ozone depletion, global warming, and acid rain are all the result of human activity at a level of half the current projection. World food production stabilized in 1988 and fell 5% in both 1987 and 1988. In both those years, world population grew 3.6% annually. Every year 14 million tons of grain production are lost to soil erosion, irrigation damage, poor land management, air pollution, flooding, acid rain, and increased ultraviolet radiation. Controlling population growth is not an easy task because of the complexities involved. Increasing female literacy and reducing infant mortality rates are very powerful means of controlling growth. China has served as the best example by reducing its growth rate from 4.75 in the early 70s to 2.36 in just 10 years. They accomplished this in a homogeneous society by making population control a civic duty. They provided rewards for small families and penalties for large ones. Family planning need is still very high, although it ranges from 12% in the Ivory Coast to 77% in the Republic of Korea. The UNFPA goal is to make family planning available to 59% os the world is couples by 2000. To do this, an additional US$9 billion needs to be spent which is a tiny fraction of total development aid to the 3rd world. In 1990 .9% of the total amount of development aid went to population and family planning programs.
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  16. 16
    069179

    Interview: Mr. George Walmsley: UNFPA Country Director for the Philippines.

    ASIA-PACIFIC POPIN BULLETIN. 1991 Jun; 3(2):7-11.

    George Walmsley, UNFPA country director for the Philippines, discusses demographic and economic conditions in the Philippines, and present plans to revitalize the national population program after 20 years of only modest achievements. The Philippines is a rapidly growing country with much poverty, unemployment and underemployment, uneven population distribution, and a large, highly dependent segment of children and youths under age 15. Initial thrusts of the population program were in favor of fertility reduction, ultimately changing to adopt a perspective more attuned to promoting overall family welfare. Concurrent with this change also came a shift from a clinic-based to community-based approach. Fertility declines have nonetheless grown weaker over the past 8-10 years. A large gap exists between family planning knowledge and practice, with contraceptive prevalence rates declining from 45% in 1986 to 36% in 1988. Behind this lackluster performance are a lack of consistent political support, discontinuities in program implementation, a lack of coordination among participating agencies, and obstacles to program implementation at the field level. The present government considers the revitalization of this program a priority concern. Mr. Walmsley discusses UNFPA's definition of a priority country, and what that means for the Philippines in terms of resources nd future activities. He further responds to questions about the expected effect of the Catholic church upon program implementation and success, non-governmental organization involvement, the role of information and information systems in the program, the relationship between population, environment and sustainable development, and the status of women and its effect on population.
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  17. 17
    064186

    The state of world population 1990: choices for the new century.

    Sadik N

    New York, New York, United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA], 1990. 40 p.

    The decade of the 1990's, the Fourth Development Decade, will be "critical" because of the world's demographic situation will determine the future for the 21st century in terms of population growth and the effect of growing populations in terms of damage to the environment. Despite the fact that government political support for population programs and activities rose from 97 countries in 1976 to 125 in 1988 (Africa rose from 16 in 1978 to 30 in 1988), the contraceptive prevalence rates in developing countries (excluding China) during the 1980's fell below 40%. Many countries encountered a "mix" of difficulties maintaining their family planning programs (FP) because of declining political support and the debt burden forcing governments to reduce investments in health and social welfare programs, including FP. By the year 2025 the UN expects 8,467 million people; 147 million (<5%) will be in the industrialized countries and 95% in the developing countries of Africa, Latin America and Asia. This report discusses human resource development during the Fourth Development Decade. FP and population programs must become integral components of countries' development process to achieve sustainable economic growth. 19 recommendations are offered on how to achieve sustained fertility declines. This UNFPA report includes the following sections: Introduction; Part 1 "The Challenges Ahead"; Part 2 "Keeping the Options Open"; Part 3 "Human Resource Development-A New Priority"; Conclusion and Recommendations.
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  18. 18
    271782

    Old challenges and new areas for international co-operation in population.

    Sadik N

    POPULATION BULLETIN OF THE UNITED NATIONS. 1989; (27):125-35.

    Taking stock of accomplishments in the field of population reveals that significant progress has been made since the late 1960s but that much remains to be done. Important challenges in population for 1990 and beyond include the implementation of more effective family planning programs, greater accessibility to better family planning services at the local level, a wider range of choices in contraceptive methods, and better training and supervision of family planning delivery personnel. Another major challenge is to give attention to the various aspects of the role of women--beyond mere acknowledgement and to the actual implementation of programs. Further, policies need to be formulated and implemented across several sectors to deal with the complex interaction between population, resources, and the environment. To devise such policies, knowledge of the interrelationships needs to be clarified and refined. Finally, still greater emphasis will have to be placed on improving the integration of population and development. Accomplishing that will require wider awareness, enhanced coordination and adequate resources--an increase of at least $100 million per year from now to the end of the century over the annual current level of some $550 million for all external assistance for population. (author's)
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