Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    099397

    The International Conference on Population and Development, September 5-13, 1994, Cairo, Egypt. Nepal's country report.

    Nepal. National Planning Commission

    Kathmandu, Nepal, National Planning Commission, 1993 Sep. vi, 49 p.

    Prepared for the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this country report from Nepal opens with a description of the geographic features and administrative regions, zones, and districts of the country. 91% of the population of Nepal is rural, and agriculture accounts for 57% of the gross domestic product. Nepal has made some socioeconomic gains from 1961 to 1991 which are reflected in improved life expectancy (from 34 to 54.4 years), a decline in the infant mortality rate (from 200 to 102), and an improvement in the literacy rate (from 9 to > 40%). However, the per capital income of US $180 and rapid population growth have impeded improvement in the standard of living. The new government of Nepal is committed to establishing a better balance between population and the environment. This report provides a discussion of population growth and structure; population distribution, urbanization, and migration; the environment and sustainable development; the status of women; population policies and programs (highlighting the population policy of the plan for 1992-97); the national family planning program and health programs; and intervention issues. A 15-point summary is provided, and details of the objectives, priorities, and major policy thrust in regard to population and development of the Eight Plan (1992-97) are appended.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    073669

    Youth, population and development.

    United Nations Population Fund [UNFPA]

    New York, New York, UNFPA, [1991]. [3], 16 p. (Programme Advisory Note)

    This report explains that a comprehensive strategy is needed to meet the reproductive health needs of young people and to facilitate their participation in development. Out of a world population of 5.3 billion people, 1.5 billion are between the ages of 10 and 24 years. 82% of these young people live in developing countries. And with the total fertility of developing countries at 4.0, the number of young people will continue to increase. Developing countries already face enormous problems in providing education and employment to these young people. The report identifies the issues that are involved in youth, population, and development, such as reproductive health information, family planning services, population distribution and urban migration, and sustainable development. The report also provides examples of UNFPA-funded youth projects. A program in Thailand, for example, aims to raise contraceptive awareness among adolescents in school. The outcome of these projects indicates the need fora comprehensive strategy that takes into account the following: 1) developing and implementing youth policies, plans, and programs; 2) carefully targeting IEC activities to specific audiences; 3) strengthening maternal and child health/family planning services for young people, including unmarried youth; 4) improving the status of young women; 5) increasing the involvement of men in family matters, especially family planning; 6) complementing other development activities that have wide-range impact; and 7) using nongovernmental organizations to help empower young people.
    Add to my documents.