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Your search found 3 Results

  1. 1
    330689

    Recommendations to Promote Safe and Effective Use of Contraceptives: World Health Organization [letter]

    Shrivastava SR; Shrivastava PS; Ramasamy J

    CHRISMED Journal of Health and Research. 2017 Oct-Dec; 4(4):291.

    The authors discuss the need to support and strengthen national family planning programs through more investment and better awareness to address the 220 million women who have an unmet need for family planning.
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  2. 2
    338980
    Peer Reviewed

    WHO tiered-effectiveness counseling is rights-based family planning.

    Stanback J; Steiner M; Dorflinger L; Solo J; Cates W Jr

    Global Health: Science and Practice. 2015 Sep 10; 3(3):352-357.

    Contraceptive effectiveness is the leading characteristic for most women when choosing a method, but they often are not well informed about effectiveness of methods. Because of the serious consequences of “misinformed choice,” counseling should proactively discuss the most effective methods-long-acting reversible contraceptives and permanent methods-using the WHO tiered-effectiveness model.
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  3. 3
    077929

    Male involvement programs in family planning: lessons learned and implications for AIDS prevention.

    Green CP

    [Unpublished] 1990 Mar 6. vi, 71 p.

    Men may impede broader use of family planning methods by women in many countries. Efforts have therefore been made to reach men separately in order to promote greater acceptance and use of male or female contraceptive methods. Typically, programs may encourage men to allow partners to use contraception; persuade men to adopt a more active, communicative role in decision making on contraceptive use; and/or promote the use of male methods. This paper presents findings from male involvement program initiatives in 60 developing countries since 1980. Male involvement programs are clearly needed, and condom use should be encouraged for protection against both pregnancy and HIV infection. Given their relatively low cost per couple-year of protection, social marketing programs should be encouraged to promote condom sales. Employment-based programs, despite relatively high start-up costs, have also generated large increases in condom use. Both condom and vasectomy use have been increased through mass media campaigns, yet more campaigns should address AIDS. Clinic services and facilities should be made more attractive to men, and new print materials are warranted. Community-based distribution programs have been found to be great sources of information and supplies, especially in rural areas, and male adolescents are especially in favor of telephone hotlines. Little information exits on the effectiveness and costs of programs targeting organized groups. Further, youth-oriented programs generally reach their intended audiences, but are relatively expensive for the amount of contraceptive protection provided. Finally, a positive image must be promoted for the condom through coordinated media presentations, user and worker doubts of efficacy must be eliminated, and regular condom supplies ensured. Recommendations are included for policy, research, public education, the World Health Organization, national AIDS prevention programs, and family planning agencies.
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