Important: The POPLINE website will retire on September 1, 2019. Click here to read about the transition.

Your search found 2 Results

  1. 1
    034489

    Planned Parenthood education programs: a national overview.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America [PPFA]

    New York, New York, PPFA, 1985 Feb. 8 p.

    This booklet highlights a selection of some current Planned Parenthood education programs. 3 programs in the area of child sexual abuse include the Sexual Abuse Prevention Project (SAPP), the "Bubbylonian Encounter" -- a sexual abuse prevention program, and OK Bears, an education program for parents and other adults. SAPP is designed to get more people involved and informed about sexual abuse, to educate both parents and children in prevention techniques, and to prepare both parents and educators for possible disclosures that may result from the program's presentations. In less than 1 year, "Bubbylonian Encounter", a program for elementary school children, has received so much community support that it has expanded to school districts in other counties. "OK/Not OK Touches" educates parents and other adults about sexual abuse of children so they can separate the myths from the facts and communicate with children about this sensitive subject. In the area of teen theater, "An Ounce of Prevention" is a comprehensive videotape project on child sexual abuse. Also in this area are The Great Body Show -- a rural family planning program designed to reduce teen pregnancy through increased education; TACT (Teenage Communication Theater) -- an approach to education using drama to heighten awareness of problems of teens: Youth Expression Theater, which uses drama to heighten awareness of the real problems and pressures faced by teens in the social and sexual areas of their lives; THE SOURCE -- a 15-member volunteer teen outreach council which wrote their own play, "Speak Up-Speak Out;" and the Washington Area Improvisational Teen Theater, which has as its purpose to increase awareness and provide the information teenagers need in order to make responsible decisions regarding their sexuality. Parent/child education programs include APPLES, a set of 4 prevention and education-oriented programs for adolescent parents and their children; Parents and Children Together (P.A.C.T.), an early teenage pregnancy prevention program aimed at providing family life education to parents and children of all ages; and the Parent Education Program of New York City, which offers a variety of resources to help parents become better sexuality educators for their children. Two male involvement programs and Boys and Babies, a program which enhances and builds on the innate potential of all humans to care and nurture, and The Male Services Program, which is based on the premise that young men can make better, more responsible decisions about their sexual behavior with education and guidance.
    Add to my documents.
  2. 2
    024731

    Adolescent fertility: report of an international consultation, Bellagio 1983.

    McKay J

    London, England, IPPF, 1984 May. ii, 59 p.

    The Bellagio consultation was held in July, 1983 on the initiative of the Programme Committee of International Medical Advisory Panel to consider more closely what the needs of adolescents are and what more should be done to meet them. Participants from several countries--within and outside of IPPF--were invited. Before the Consultation, participants exchanged information, experience and ideas in writing as a basis for their discussion. 3 topics were focused on: 1) needs and problems; 2) information, education, and counselling; and 3) reproductive health management. An action plan for the next 3 to 5 years was drawn up. It offers broad suggestions about the kind of activities that would be appropriate for family planning associations and IPPF to take. Adolescents all over the world are in need of much better education and health care related to fertility, these are not the same in each society. A comprehensive approach to adolescent needs is favored. The recommendations form part of a broad discussion about how adolescents can best be helped to behave responsibly. Adolescent fertility has implications for health, psychological, social and economic well being. General program and operational guidelines are given, as are 8 areas for action: 1) creation of awareness and advocacy; 2) youth leadership and participation in adolescent programs; 3) information and education; 4) counseling; 5) fertility-related services; 6) sharing of experience, information and resources; 7) training and skill development; and 8) research. A list of participants and background papers is given.
    Add to my documents.