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  1. 1
    344566

    Quality of care in contraceptive information and services, based on human rights standards: a checklist for health care providers.

    World Health Organization [WHO]

    Geneva, Switzerland, WHO, 2017. 32 p.

    International and regional human rights treaties, national constitutions and laws provide guarantees specifically relating to access to contraceptive information, commodities and services. In addition, over the past few decades, international, regional and national legislative and human rights bodies have increasingly applied human rights to contraceptive information and services. This document presents a user friendly checklist specifically addressed to health care providers, at the primary health care level, who are involved in the direct provision of contraceptive information and services. It is complimentary to WHO guidelines on Ensuring human rights in the provision of contraceptive information and services: Guidance and recommendations, and the Implementation Guide published jointly with UNFPA in 2015. This checklist also builds on WHO vision document on Standards for Improving Quality of Care for Maternal and Newborn Care and its ongoing work under the Quality, Equity and Dignity initiative. The checklist should be read along with other guidance from WHO and also from partners.
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  2. 2
    288784
    Peer Reviewed

    Keeping up with evidence. A new system for WHO's evidence-based family planning guidance.

    Mohllajee AP; Curtis KM; Flanagan RG; Rinehart W; Gaffield ML

    American Journal of Preventive Medicine. 2005; 28(5):483-490.

    The World Health Organization (WHO) is responsible for providing evidence-based family planning guidance for use worldwide. WHO currently has two such guidelines, Medical Eligibility Criteria for Contraceptive Use and Selected Practice Recommendations for Contraceptive Use, which are widely used globally and often incorporated into national family planning standards and guidelines. To ensure that these guidelines remain up-to-date, WHO, in collaboration with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the Information and Knowledge for Optimal Health (INFO) Project at the Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health’s Center for Communication Programs, has developed the Continuous Identification of Research Evidence (CIRE) system to identify, synthesize, and evaluate new scientific evidence as it becomes available. The CIRE system identifies new evidence that is relevant to current WHO family planning recommendations through ongoing review of the input to the POPulation information onLINE (POPLINE) database. Using the Meta-Analysis of Observational Studies in Epidemiology guidelines and standardized abstract forms, systematic reviews are conducted, peer-reviewed, and sent to WHO for further action. Since the system began in October 2002, 90 relevant new articles have been identified, leading to 43 systematic reviews, which were used during the 2003–2004 revisions of WHO’s family planning guidelines. The partnership developed to create and manage the CIRE system has pooled existing resources; scaled up the methodology for evaluating and synthesizing evidence, including a peer-review process; and provided WHO with finger-on-the-pulse capability to ensure that its family planning guidelines remain up-to-date and based on the best available evidence. (author's)
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  3. 3
    136038

    Medical and service delivery guidelines for family planning. 2nd ed., 1997.

    Huezo CM; Carignan CS

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF], 1997. xxii, 298 p. (IPPF Medical Publications)

    Consistent with the framework adopted at the 1994 International Conference on Population and Development, this second edition of "Medical and Service Delivery Guidelines for Family Planning" emphasizes the reproductive health needs of couples rather than family planning (FP) program targets. The focus of the guidelines is on providing services that reach essential standards of quality and are scientifically, socially, and operationally sound. They can be utilized as a guide for the delivery of FP services, a reference document for assessing quality of care, an outline for pre-service and in-service training, and as a tool for supervisors. In addition to updating information on specific contraceptive methods, this second edition includes new chapters on emergency contraception, pregnancy diagnosis, reproductive tract infections and STDs, and infection prevention and control. Intended users include program planners and users, as well as clinical and community-based services providers, trainers, and supervisors.
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