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  1. 1
    137531

    FPAs pioneer male participation initiatives.

    IPPF AND CAIRO PLUS 5. 1998 Oct; (5):1.

    Family Planning Associations (FPAs) have begun efforts to increase male participation in sexual and reproductive health and in family planning (FP). In Singapore, the FPA's marriage enrichment project is designed to ensure women's equity and to enrich couples' relationships. In the Democratic People's Republic of Korea, the FPA is producing and distributing printed materials emphasizing the necessity of empowerment and equity for women in development. In Sierra Leone, the FPA introduced a program for men concerning the prevention of sexually transmitted diseases (STDs) and the socioeconomic advantages of a small family. In Kenya, the FPA is providing services for men in its clinics. In Morocco, Lebanon, and Tunisia, FPAs are responding to the International Planned Parenthood Federation's (IPPF's) "Vision 2000" by conducting research on male attitudes toward FP and toward reproductive and sexual health. In India, the FPA, as part of the "Calcutta Project," is establishing workplace units for the provision of FP services and information to male workers. In Denmark and Sweden, the FPAs have begun discussion groups for adolescent males and male youth concerning male sexuality and sex education. These have led to training activities for sex educators and boys regarding male sexuality and role in contraceptive use. In Trinidad and Tobago, the FPA operates male clinics providing prostate exams, FP services, counseling, and IEC sessions. In St. Kitts, the FPA is conducting male involvement workshops focusing on self-esteem, family life, and personal relationships.
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  2. 2
    201524

    Family planning in a changing world: an IPPF reappraisal.

    International Planned Parenthood Federation [IPPF]

    London, England, International Planned Parenthood Federation, 1987. v, 57, [6] p.

    The present survey of the international environment in which the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF) operates shows many advances in family planning, in particular the strong commitment of most governments. But it also confirms that there is still an unmet need on a very large scale and in many countries the gap between knowledge and practice of family planning is striking evidence of the absence of services and of adequate motivation. The resurgence of opposition to family planning and the declining investment in contraceptive research are significant negative trends. A positive development of great importance to IPPF is the strong endorsement of the role of non-governmental organizations, and this represents a special challenge in the years ahead. Family planning associations (FPAs) retain, but could strengthen, their important role as advocates of family planning at the national level, now needed more than ever to counter new forms of opposition. Donors while anxious for FPAs to remain at the cutting edge, are in the main content with the contributions FPAs make as consumer-oriented, voluntary movements for family planning. The importance of IPPF for information, inspiration, and support is now more widely recognized among FPAs. IPPF's general principles include 1) human rights,2) a strong non-governmental role, 3) a voluntary movement, 4) autonomy and responsibility, 5) voluntary and informed choice, 6) advocacy, 7) improved service delivery, 8) increasing demand and practice, 9) meeting the needs of young people, 10) male involvement in family planning, 11) combining family planning with other development activities, 12) management training and program evaluation, 13) resource development at a local level, and 14) long-term planning.
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  3. 3
    271242

    World wide report on A.I.D. and IPPF funded population activities, FY 1987-FY 1988.

    United States. Agency for International Development [USAID]. Office of Population; John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1989 Jan. 222 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This issue of the semi-annual Population Project Database Report contains short narrative summaries describing AID-funded population and family planning subprojects primarily as a management toil for the Office of Population; however, it may be useful for the entire international population community. The introduction begins with a discussion of AID population assistance -- how the funds are administered, where the support for activities comes from, and what types of projects are supported by AID's grants and contracts. The 1987 expenditures and 1988 commitments by cooperating agencies for in-country subproject activities are presented followed by a summary of AID subproject activities. This FY1987-FY1988 report includes information on 2,070 AID subproject activities in 94 countries. Of these, 30% concentrate on family planning service delivery, 24% on training-oriented activities, and 17% emphasize research to develop improved contraceptive methods. An additional 8% focus on education, information and communications with regard to family planning, and 7% are primarily concerned with operations research aimed at developing improved ways to deliver family planning services in developing countries. The data in this report were assembled from the Population Projects Database (PPD), a computer-based information system for the Agency for international Development. The bulk of the report is presented in tables which detail AID and IPPF funded population activities in FY1987 and FY1988 by cooperating agency, country and the following regions: Africa, Asia/Near East, Latin America/Caribbean, US/Canada, Europe/Australia, and inter regional. New charts showing the number and types of subproject activities in each region are also include.
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  4. 4
    270580

    Worldwide reports on A.I.D. population programs, FY 1987.

    John Snow [JSI]. Family Planning Logistics Management Project

    Boston, Massachusetts, John Snow, Inc., 1988 Mar. 33 p. (Population Projects Database)

    This document contains, in looseleaf format, reports generated from the Office of Population's Population Projects Database (PPD) which is now maintained by John Snow's (JSI) Family Planning Logistics Management Project. JSI will issue "The Woldwide Report on A.I.D. and IPPF Funded Population Activities," also known as the "Subproject Activities Report," on a semi-annual basis. The fiscal year (FY) 1986 to FY 1987 is now available. Issued on an annual basis will be "The Country Funding Attribution Report"; the report for FY 1987 is included in the binder under the heading: CA Cost Report. Also provided is a list of current contracts, an acronym list, and an instruction manual for filling in the questionnaire on which the porject reports are based. A blank section is also provided for any special reports requested by the user from the Population Projects Database. Using the subproject activities report and the CA Cost Report together provides a full picture of population activities worldwide. Both reports are organized by country and both attempt to capture actual expenditures in prior years and expected expenditures in the current and future years. The reports differ in the following ways: the Subproject Activities Report focuses on in-country activities, including those carried out by A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, Cooperating Agencies and the International Planned Parenthood Federation (IPPF). It includes activities covered under host country contracts, but does not include certain US-based activities of Cooperating Agencies which support the Office of Population programs or those contracts that provide support solely in the form of technical assistance. Both descriptive and financial information is provided. The CA Cost Reports covers all contracts issued directly to Cooperating Agencies by the Office of Population as well as Mission "buy-ins" to those contracts. It does not cover other activities of A.I.D. Missions and Regional Bureaus, host country contract or activities of other international agencies. It is purely a financial report and focuses on the way total contract expenditures have been allocated among various cost categories. Both reports are prepared in tabular format. The PPD, wich was started in 1983, includes information on more than 2400 population assistance project activies funded by A.I.D. in over 100 countries; it also includes 600 projects funded by the United Nations Population Fund (UNFPA) and about 100 projects fund by IPPF. Reports on specific topics can be requested from JSI.
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  5. 5
    199275

    Family Planning International Assistance annual report, program year 10, 1980-1981.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America [PPFA]. Family Planning International Assistance [FPIA]

    New York, N.Y., Family Planning International Assistance, International Division of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1981. 171 p.

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  6. 6
    199274

    Family Planning International Assistance annual report, program year 9, 1979-1980.

    Planned Parenthood Federation of America [PPFA]. Family Planning International Assistance [FPIA]

    New York, N.Y., Family Planning International Assistance, International Division of Planned Parenthood Federation of America, 1980. 157 p.

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  7. 7
    267402

    The United Nations' flawed population policy.

    Huessy PR

    Washington, D.C., Heritage Foundation, 1984 Aug 27. 16 p. (Backgrounder No. 376)

    The United Nations' 2nd World Population Conference (Mexico City, 1984) called for greatly expanding funding for family planning assistance worldwide. The United Nations Fund for Population Activities (UNFPA), the conference's chief sponsor, will no doubt receive the largest portion of any assistance increase. UNFPA plays a critical role in population-related programs worldwide. The central debate on population policy should be over the extent and adequacy of the natural resources base and how countries can humanely and voluntarily change family size preferences. In countries like Singapore and South Korea, success has been achieved by combining social and economic incentives to discourage large families. Although couples in developing countries report wanting contraceptive service programs, they also want families of 4 to 6 children. So far UNFPA has been ineffective in changing the population situation. This overview of its activities reveals that UNFPA loses ultimate reponsibility for implementation of many of its own programs. UNFPA does not advocate a reduction in population growth within a single country, but rather helps couples have the number of children they desire. UNFPA's specific population and family programs are divided into functional areas: basic data collection, population change study, formulation and implementation of population policies, support for family planning/maternal child health programs and educational and communication programs. UNFPA stresses the importance of using contraceptives but not of achieving the small family norm. UNFPA's projects in some of the largest less developed nations are described, illustrating how the UN agency spends its assistance funds. From 1971 to 1982, the UNFPA spent almost US $230 million in the 10 largest less developed countries without any significant change in population growth. UNFPA program administrators are far from resolving the serious population problems facing developing countries and generally oblivious to new directions in which population policies should move. No progress will be made until UNFPA recognizes the need to approach the problem from a different perspective, working to change attitudes toward small families.
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